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The National American Indian & Alaska Native ATTC would like to offer support to future American Indian and Alaska Native leaders in the behavioral health and addiction service fields by inviting participation in a comprehensive leadership preparation program which provides a balance of traditional training seminars, distance education, and field education. We are currently seeking participants and mentors for the 2015-2016 academic year.

This program will provide opportunities for participants to:

  • Develop personal leadership styles and skills
  • Network with other developing leaders, and gain practical experience for the “real world”
  • Earn a Certificate of Leadership

This program provides a meaningful experience for mentors, including opportunities to:

  • Offer professional networking, and take the behavioral health and addiction services fields into the future
  • Encourage mentee’s intellectual and professional development
  • Foster agency growth as a result of engaging in mentee projects
  • Experience self-fulfillment through mentee growth

If you are interested in applying to this program as a participant, please use this application.

If you are interested in applying to this program as a mentor, please use this application.

Application deadline: June 22, 2015.

For additional information, or to submit your application, please contact our staff:

Graduation, 2015 in Portland, Oregon
Pictured from left to right, top row: Peter Nathan, Sean Bear, Anne Helene Skinstad, Brent Lierman (trainer), Jacki Bock, Ray Daw, Anne McCoy. Front row: Patrick Calf Looking (mentor, 2015), Donna Belgarde (participant, 2015), John Jewett (participant, 2015), Dale Walker (mentor, 2015), Clyde McCoy.
Not pictured: Charity Schwengle (participant 2015).

History of the Program

The ATTC network offered a Leadership Institute in every region across the country from 2004 through 2010. These Leadership Institutes have developed many of those currently in leadership positions across the country (Bergthold, Skinstad, & Summers, 2010; Skinstad, 2009; Waters, 2009).

Pam Waters, who at the time was the Director of the Southern Coast ATTC, developed the curriculum for this initiative as well as for the Advanced Leadership Institute, which was offered in 2011.

Four ATTCs offered specific Leadership Institutes for up and coming leaders in the American Indian and Alaska Native community during this time as well; the four included the Great Lakes ATTC, North West Frontier ATTC, and Mountain West ATTC, all in collaboration with the Prairielands ATTC (now the National American Indian and Alaska Native ATTC). These efforts were very successful and provided experiences upon which the current Leadership Institute is being based.

Task Force for the American Indian & Alaska Native Leadership Academy

The National American Indian and Alaska Native ATTC convened a group of tribal leaders who had been participants or mentors in these leadership institutes for a two-day Leadership Academy Task Force Meeting at the end of October, 2013. The Task Force worked to develop 1) a cultural adaptation of the ATTC Leadership Institute, 2) a recruitment plan that will promote American Indians and Alaska Natives to take leadership roles, and 3) a timeline for this project. Respected colleagues from across the nation traveled to the University of Iowa to participate.

Linda Woods opened the Task Force meeting by presenting an Eagle Staff (pictured). She provided a narrative about the significance of the Eagle Staff, how it came into her possession, and the symbolism behind its design. “Each feather tells a story,” she explained. After a poignant moment honoring the Eagle Staff, Professor Joe Coulter offered a prayer to begin the meeting.

Pam Waters facilitated the meeting that started with an overview of leadership, followed by a discussion of the experiences of other regional ATTCs in addressing leadership development in American Indian communities. The Task Force brainstormed historical and contemporary cultural issues, recruitment characteristics, recruitment strategies, goal statements, and marketing strategies. The Task Force also discussed use of different assessment tools in preparing mentees for their immersion training. Overall, the members of the task force agreed that they need to continuously seek ways to honor the paths of those walking in two worlds. The phrase walking in two worlds is used to describe the experiences of American Indians and Alaska Natives who constantly balance the expectations of indigenous culture and non-Native culture.

Pictured from left to right: Lisa Brunk, Anne Helene Skinstad, Clyde McCoy, Linda Woods, Jacki Bock, Marilyn Spoon, Terra Hamblin, Pam Waters, Lenore Myers, and Julie Cain.
Not pictured: Brent Lierman, Sean Bear, Mandy Conrad, Arlene Kashata, William Martin, Richard Moreno, Dale Walker, Kellie Webb, Lakota Holman, and Myron Lee Little Bird.

Trainer
Brent Lierman, PhD, Member of the Cherokee Nation

Curriculum Development
Brent Lierman, PhD, Member of the Cherokee Nation
Mandy Conrad, BS, Doctoral Trainee
Sean Bear Sr., BA, CADC, Sac & Fox Tribe of Mississippi in Iowa

Facilitator and Curriculum Writer
Pam Waters, MA, CAC, CAPP

Task Force Members:
Lisa Brunk, BS, CADC, Member of the Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians
Julie M. Cain, BS, LAC, Member of the Blackfeet Nation of Montana
Arlene Kashata, MA, Odawa enrolled with the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa & Chippewa Indians in Michigan
William Martin, Member of the Creek Nation
Clyde B. McCoy, PhD, Eastern Band of the Cherokee Nation
Richard Moreno, M Ed
Lenore Myers, MS, Member of the Chippewa Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy Reservation
Roger Dale Walker, MD, Member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma
Kellie Webb, LAT, Member of Eastern Shoshone/Cowlitz
Linda Woods, MSW, Odawa enrolled with the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa & Chippewa Indians in Michigan
Marilyn Spoon, BS, CADC, Member of the Sac and Fox Nation of Oklahoma
Lakota R. M. Holman, M Ed, Rosebud Sioux Tribe
Myron Lee Little Bird, AAS, CADC, NCEAC, Tribal Councilman for Northern Cheyenne tribe

National American Indian and Alaska Native ATTC home office:
Jacki Bock, Fiscal and Contractual Manager
Sean Bear, Sr., BA, CADC, Sac & Fox Tribe of Mississippi in Iowa
Mandy Conrad, BS, Doctoral Trainee
Anne Helene Skinstad, PhD

National Rural and Frontier ATTC:
Terra Hamblin, MA. Program Manager of the National Frontier and rural ATTC

References

Bergthold, T., Skinstad, A.H., Summers, K. (2010, June). A retrospective study of protégés and mentors of the Prairielands ATTC Leadership Development Program: The Importance of the Mentor-Protégés relationship. Poster presented at the CPDD 72nd Annual Scientific Meeting, Scottsdale, AZ.

Skinstad, A.H. (2009, June). Leadership development in the Prairielands ATTC Region. Presentation made at the workshop/symposium: “Leadership in the Making: Impact and Insights from Leadership Development Programs for Leaders of Addiction Services” at the 71st Annual Scientific Meeting of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence, Reno, NV.

Waters, P. and Pann, J. (2009, June). A retrospective study of the impact of the Southern Coast ATTC Leadership Development Program. Workshop presentation at the CPDD 71st Annual Scientific Meeting, Reno, NV.

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