En Español

Webinars and ToTs

This section of our website provides the recording of previous webinars and ToTs (Trainers of Trainers) sessions. Feel free to review these sessions as they might be relevant to your practice as a substance abuse counselor serving Hispanic and Latino populations.

August 23, 2017

Make Your Program Work  Cultural Adaptation Resources for Latino Serving Substance Use Treatment Organizations

Slides

Latino groups across the country are diverse and need substance abuse treatment intervention programs that support their specific cultural needs. While there are a great number of evidence-based treatments (EBTs) available for substance use disorders (SUDs), few are specific to Latino groups, or those developed for one specific Latino group may not generalize to other Latino groups from different regions (e.g, rural/urban), historical backgrounds (e.g., immigrant/non-immigrant, or refugee), religious backgrounds, and socioeconomic settings. Therefore, culturally adapting an EBT to the specific needs of a particular Latino group may be necessary. This presentation will provide information regarding an array of cultural adaptation models; highlight the benefits and challenges of undertaking cultural adaptations; and provide recommendations and resources should service providers chose to culturally adapt an existing substance use EBT for Latinos.

June 2, 2017

Immigration, Trauma and Substance Use:
The Latino Journey to the U.S.
What next?

 
Often times we return from a conference filled with excitement and ready to use the new knowledge or skills we have acquired, only to find that change is hard. Supervisors or colleagues who did not attend the conference might not share in our excitement, and our efforts might be ignored, or worst, rebuffed: “that’s not the way we do things here”. This post-conference gathering, meant for individuals who attended the “Immigration, Trauma, and Substance Use: The Latino Journey to the U.S.” conference in Houston on May 23rd-24th 2017, and for those who couldn’t attend, will offer some distilled “lessons for practice” and additional resources from each of the presentations at the conference, and will engage participants in a discussion of how they may use the knowledge and skills acquired after returning to their workplaces.

March 30, 2017

Opioid Use Disorders in Hispanic and Latinos Living in the United States

 

Public health officials, policy makers, elected officials, substance se disorders (SUDs) treatment providers, community activists, recovery organizations, and families all agree that the United States of America faces a crisis when it comes to the use of opioids and other substances. Among Hispanics in the US this crisis has been evident for decades. Data from SAMHSA indicates the need to better understand opioid disorders, as well as the treatment and recovery supports needs of Hispanic and Latinos. This presentation will address how this crisis further highlights the importance that behavioral health providers integrate and address cultural elements, evidence-based models, promising practices that are central to treating effectively Hispanic and Latinos.


Febraury 28, 2017

You don't have to be a Latino to provide services to Latino populations

 
This presentation, by a non-Latino clinician who has worked extensively in Spanish and with Latino patients, integrates available research on effective clinical practice with Latinos with first-hand experience in providing transcultural psychotherapy.

December 15, 2016

Providing culturally competent clinical supervision when working with Hispanic and Latino populations

*Q&A's

Slides

Professional supervision is defined as the relationship between supervisor and supervisee in which the responsibility and accountability for the development of competence, demeanor, and ethical practice take place. Because culture incorporates the influences of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, class, and so forth on our thoughts, assumptions, and behaviors, it is possible to conceptualize all supervision as multicultural. The impact of the socio-cultural–political identities of the supervisory triad that includes the client, supervisee, and the supervisor must be considered to deliver culturally competent supervision.


September 28th, 2016

Intersection of acculturation, acculturative stress and contextual trauma in the lives in Latina/o communities as it relates to substance use

*Q&A's
 
 

 

This presentation addresses the intersectionality of acculturation, acculturative stress and the contextual trauma in the lives in Latina/o communities. Some studies indicate that substance dependence and abuse are growing steadily within Latina/o communities in the United States. Unexamined, it would be easy to assume that the problem lies solely within the individual’s control, however the development of social issues is often the consequence of factors extending beyond an individual's control and local geographical environment. While the use, or abuse, of substances may seem like a choice, this presentation argues that the struggle between maintaining ones Latina/o cultural identity and traditions, while attempting to adapt to a cultural community that may be in direct contradiction, creates stressful and deleterious environments for many Latinas/os. 

July 13th, 2016

Tratamiento específico por género: Reconociendo las realidades de las mujeres al atender los trastornos por uso de sustancia 

*Q&A's

Slides


May 18th, 2016

Developing Culturally Centered Interventions for Hispanic and Latino Populations

 

*Q&A's

Slides

The cultural values of “familismo”, “machismo”, and “personalismo” have been found to impact interpersonal and intrapersonal behaviors within Hispanic and Latino populations. Endorsing the belief that mental illness is a chronic condition is negatively associated with individuals' sense of treatment and personal control over their illness. Evidence-based practice requires the integration of evidence and scientific methods with practice wisdom, the worldview of the practitioner, and the client’s perspectives and values. The inclusion of the client’s perspectives requires an understanding of their cultural perspective. Practitioners often continue to place themselves at the center of the clinician-client relationship by choosing interventions that do not consider the role of power in the relationship, and that undervalue the client’s perspective. This causes a culturally incompetent and non-efficacious treatment framework. Culturally-adapted interventions are advantageous because they allow the clinician to address culturally specific risk factors and build on identified protective factors, such as cultural norms that place a high value on family loyalty.


Abril 8th, 2016

Let’s Talk About It: Hepatitis C and Hispanics in the United States

*Q&A's

Slides

The number of Hispanics with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is higher than the number of people with hepatitis C in the general population.  Treatment of hepatitis C has been found to be as effective in Hispanics as it is in Whites, but there still many barriers for adequate treatment.  Barriers to HCV care in the Hispanic community may include language barriers, access to care, lack of education to the patient, insurance barriers, lack of trust in health care, immigration status, cultural differences, and lack of HCV awareness. There is much we can do, let’s talk about it!


March 22nd, 2016

Substance Use, Domestic Violence, and Latin@s: Examining the Intersections [Part 2]

*Q&A's
 
 
SlidesThis is the second part or the topic presenting additional information about the intersection between substance use, and interpersonal violence.  Facts highlights that substance use and domestic violence are deeply affected by numerous factors, both personal and systemic; and that substance use impacts the victim’s competence on assessing danger, seeking assistance, and accessing services.   Strategies for safety, sobriety and wellness are discussed.

January 14th, 2016

Substance Use, Domestic Violence, and Latin@s: Examining the Intersections

*Q&A's

 
Although recent research shows a strong relationship between intimate partner violence and greater frequency of alcohol intoxication, the overall evidence regarding whether a woman’s alcohol abuse increases her likelihood of experiencing intimate partner violence has been described as “weak.” Experiences of interpersonal violence, the stress of living in a new country with different cultural norms and language, discrimination, socioeconomic pressures, loss of social support mechanisms upon immigration, and exposure to drugs and alcohol often lead to chemical use and dependency. Trauma is often the common thread running through a variety of co-occurring issues, ranging from mental health disabilities to substance abuse, poverty, and exploitation resulting from the sex industry, homelessness and incarceration.

October 16th, 2015

Understanding and Preventing Suicide Attempts among Teenage Hispanic Girls 

*Q&A's

 
Since 1991, the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) has consistently shown that Latinas in American high schools think about, plan, and attempt suicide more than any other group of teenagers. Other research has shown that US-born Latinas are more likely to attempt than foreign-born Latinas and that even in the middle school years, around age 12 years. Hispanic girls have a higher rate of attempts than boys or girls of any ethnic or racial group. Behavioral and social science research conducted on this population shows that there are a number of factors that converge which may explain the higher-than-average rates. An understanding of this phenomenon requires an appreciation of family systems theory, adolescent developmental theory, and cultural-psychological theory. This presentation covers these areas and points for clinical intervention and prevention.

September 30th, 2015

Familia Adelante: An Effective Substance Use Prevention and Stress Reduction program for Latino Adolescents

*Q&A's

 
Interventions that target both HIV and substance use prevention in adolescents are scarce or are not designed for Hispanic youth. Familia Adelante (FA) is a behavioral health intervention that focuses on empirically-based and culturally-based risk factors within the Latino community. FA consists of twelve English or Spanish language, 90-minute modules for at-risk youth (age 10-14) and their parents. FA has been effective in reducing family stress, reducing youth behavior problems, enhancing academic achievement and psychosocial coping, and decreasing substance use patterns in Hispanic youth.

July 15th, 2015

The Cultural Accommodation Model of Substance Abuse Treatment (CAM-SAT) for Latino Adolescents

*Q&A's

 
Cultural Accommodation Model of Substance Abuse Treatment is a four stage model for the development and testing of a culturally accommodated version of a substance abuse treatment against its standard (non-adapted) counterpart for Latino adolescents. The four stages of the CAM-SAT include: sources of information, accommodation, pilot testing and efficacy testing.

Webinar-June 17th, 2015-Modelo de Intervención Psicomédica (MIP) 

 
 
Q&A's-Coming Soon
 
 
Modelo de Intervención Psicomédica (MIP) (Psycho-Medical Intervention Model) is an evidence-based intervention model for injection drug users of any HIV status. MIP was developed by researchers in Puerto Rico, implemented, evaluated, and proven effective with Latinos.
 

Webinar-May 6th, 2015-An evidence-based practice: Brief Strategic Family Therapy® BSFT® Model  

 
 
The Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) model is an evidence-based practice tested with Hispanic population through the Clinical Trial Network (CTN) of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). It is a short term family intervention developed for prevention and treatment of children and youth 6-17 years with behavioral problems and drug use.

Webinar-March 4th, 2015-Psychosocial Interventions for Hispanics Evidence Based Practices and Beyond 

Q&A's-coming soon

Slides

Initially a term used primarily in medicine, “evidence-based practice” (EBP) is now central to the fields of education, child welfare, mental health, substance use, criminal justice, and many other fields of practice and service delivery. 


Webinar-December 16th, 2014-Latino Veterans and the Cultural Aspects that Influence their Treatment Needs 

Q&A's-coming soon

Slides

In 2010, there were 1.3 million Hispanic veterans in the United States, and a 23% increase is expected by 2030. Latinos represent 18% of the 2.1 million U.S. troops deployed to the Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation New Dawn (OND) wars and, consequently, have been exposed to traumas that can result in conditions, like Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).


Webinar-November 14th, 2014-Organizational Capacity to Eliminate Outcome Disparities under Health Care Reform 

Q&A's

Slides

Addiction health services programs in the United States are confronting an unprecedented challenge to reduce health disparities among racial and ethnic minority populations. 

This webinar will provide an overview how Organizational Capacity might have an impact on reducing behavioral health disparities among Hispanic and Latinos. 


Webinar-September 10th, 2014-Project Qs: Working with Latino LGBTQ Youth: What you Really Need to Know

Q&A's

Slides

This curriculum is designed specifically for providers working with LGBTQ trauma-exposed youth with a focus on Latino cultures. In order to provide competent care to LGBTQ youth, providers must understand the basic facts about LGBTQ youth and the issues they face. It is important to treat each client as an individual who has his or her own multi-faceted identity and experiences. This presentation will cover the basics of LGBTQ linguistic and cultural competency, address incongruences of the Latino and LGBTQ cultures, share the risk and protective factors for suicidal ideations amongst LGBTQ youth, and the importance of integrating trauma informed care into one’s practice. 

Project Q’s Working with LGBTQ Youth: What you Really Need to Know is unique from other workshops because it incorporates different learning modalities in accordance with adult learning theories. It considers the topic from the perspective of the youth, the adult caregiver, and the practitioner. This is a critical topic related to working with LGBTQ youth that is rarely explored in detail. 


Webinar- July 30th, 2014-Latino Immigration, Cultural Trauma, and Cultural Complex

Q&A's-coming soon

Slides

Latino immigration is a psychological event. The stresses and trauma of migration and the impact these have on the personal and collective psyche of Latinos are significant.

Therapists, medical professionals, and social workers in the mental health and substance use disorders field can assist the family and patient to understand they may be reacting to losses felt in childhood but never identified. It behooves those who work with immigrants to keep this in mind.


Webinar- July 9th, 2014-Psychoeducational Multifamily Groups: A Culture Specific Approach for Hispanics and Latinos in Need of Mental Health Services 

Q&A's about this webinar

Slides

Audio

Psychoeducational Multifamily Groups (MFG) is an evidence-based practice designed to help individuals with mental illness attain as rich and full participation in the usual life of the community as possible.

Webinar- May 7th, 2014-The Role of Culture in Treatment of Latinos with Substance Use Disorders

Q&A's about this webinar

Slides

Culturally relevant/competent treatment approaches and clinical settings are critical to successful recovery outcomes for Latinos. Isolation from culture, homeland and extended family and social networks increases likelihood of substance use and depression. 


Webinar-February 12th, 2014-Hispanic Street Gangs/Pandillas callejeras hispanas".

Q&A's about this webinar-coming soon

Slides

Working in the area of social service can be challenging as working with people is complex. If focus goes further in specialty areas such as substance abuse, the challenges increase significantly. Delivering substance abuse services and working in areas with issues of gangs and violence is something paraprofessionals and professionals alike are faced with in their communities. Understanding and clarifying different aspects of gangs, helps increase the effectiveness and awareness of service providers. Having increased knowledge about gangs allows workers in the area of substance abuse treatment to be cognizant of how to do and provide outreach, engagement and ongoing services to people involved in gangs and affected by gangs. 

Webinar- December 12th, 2013-"Latino Immigrant Well-Being"/"El binestar de los latinos immigrantes". 

Q&A's about this webinar

Slides

As of 2011, the Latino population in the mainland US included approximately 19 million immigrants from nearly 20 countries of origin. Like all immigrants, Latinos are often motivated to come to the US for new social, educational or economic opportunities. Still, the immigration process can be stressful and for some, traumatic, as immigrants leave behind significant family and social ties and sometimes endure difficult conditions during the journey.
Mental health symptoms in response to a traumatic event, including anxiety, flashbacks, nightmares, and avoidance, appear to be more common among Latinos exposed to trauma than among other ethnic groups. 

Webinar- December 5th, 2013-"Intimate partner violence in Hispanic and Latino population"/"La violencia de pareja entre la población hispana y latina". 

Q&A's about this webinar-coming soon

Slides-coming soon

Intimate partner violence (IPV) poses a significant risk to the physical health; it is associated with increased mortality, injury and disability, worse general health status, chronic pain, substance abuse, and reproductive disorders.


Webinar-October 9th, 2013-"Support for Hispanic and Latino Recovery Population"/"Apoyo a hispanos y latinos en recuperación" 

Q&A's about this webinar

Slides

Recovery from addiction is person-centered and culturally relevant to an individual’s journey.  There are many barriers and challenges for persons in recovery but research has shown that Hispanics and Latinos have less access to addiction treatment (Wells et al, 2001).  Typically, Hispanic and Latino individuals find recovery supports through 12 step groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous.  AA and NA groups are understood as an extended family and the relationship between a “sponsor/sponsee” is instrumental in the context of the culture.  The community has needs for a spiritual component such as the concept of a higher power.
Typically, treatment professionals do not have access to supports available in your community that are tailored for the population.  You can speak with a religious leader, a person in long term recovery or other service providers in your community that may be able to help access support systems that will sustain your recovery in an environment that is helpful to you.   Building a relationship with providers and partnering with healers in your community will aid recovery and provide a service to those that are new to recovery.

Webinar-August 28th, 2013:"The Hispanic and Latino LGBTTQ Community and its Behavioral Health Service Needs"/"La Comunidad LGBTTQ Hispana y Latina y sus Necesidades de Servicios de Salud Conductual".

Q&A's about this webinar-coming soon

Slides

This webinar will increase participant’s knowledge on mental health risk factors and stigma affecting Latino and Hispanic LGBTTQ individuals by strengthening cultural competency skills in providing mental health services for LGBTTQ populations.

Learning objectives:

  1. Discuss definitions and reasons why Latino and Hispanic LGBTTQ individuals are at higher risk experiencing mental health and substance abuse issues than the general population.
  2. Discuss diversity within LGBTTQ populations, and the unique factors affecting their mental and behavioral health.
  3. Discuss how to strengthen mental heath services for LGBTTQ individuals, and promote safe and welcoming environments with the provision of culturally appropriate health services

Webinar- July 17th, 2013: "Acculturation as a Risk Factor to Behavioral Health Problems for Hispanics and Latinos"/"Aculturación como Factor de Riesgo para los problemas de Salud Conductual en la Población Hispana y Latina".

Q&A's about this webinar-coming soon

Slides

Acculturation has been shown to have a direct relationship with levels of substance use; many studies show that the higher the level of acculturation to US culture, the higher rates of overall consumption.

Research on the topic usually points that: Hispanic and Latino cultural features and values exert a protective effect on risk factors. Promotion of Hispanic and Latino values may be an important component of preventive and treatment interventions for this population.

 ******************************

La aculturación tiene una relación directa con los niveles de uso de sustancias; muchos estudios muestran que mientras más alto es el nivel de aculturación a la cultura de los EE.UU., más altas son las tasas de consumo.

Hallazgos investigativos sugieren que los hispanos y latinos con mayor aculturación utilizan estrategias de manejo negativas, mientras que los que tienen menos aculturación utilizan más estrategias de manejo espirituales y relacionadas al sistema social.


Webinar-May 29th, 2013: "National CLAS Standards: What are they and why are they important/Los standards nacionales CLAS: Qué son y por qué son importantes"

National CLAS Standards: What are they and why are they important? from ATTC Network on Vimeo.

Questions and answers about this webinar

Q&A's

The enhanced National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) in Health Care are issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Office of Minority Health (OMH) to advance health equity, improve quality, and eliminate health care disparities by establishing a blueprint to implement culturally and linguistically appropriate services.

******************************

Los estandares CLAS mejorados (Estándares para la provisión de servicios de salud cultural y linguisticamente adecuados) son publicados por el Departamento de Salud y Servicios Humanos de los Estados Unidos a través de la Oficina de Salud para las Minorías. Estos estándares persiguen avanzar la equidad en la prestación de servicios de salud, mejorar su calidad, y cerrar la brecha en las disparidades existentes entre diversas poblaciones en Estados Unidos. Los estándares establecen un diseño para implementar y ofrecer servicios cultural y linguisticamente apropiados.  


Webinar-April 25th, 2013: Meet your new clients: Hispanics and Latinos/Conozca a sus nuevos clientes: Hispanos y latinos

Meet your new clients: Hispanics and Latinos / Conozca a sus nuevos clientes: Hispanos y Latinos from ATTC Network on Vimeo.

Questions and answers about this webinar

Q&A's

On April 25th, 2013, the National Hispanic and Latino ATTC featured Dr. Luis Torres, member of our panel of experts, scholar, and researcher on co-occurring mental health, substance abuse, and medical disorders in adolescents and young adults, with particular emphasis on Latinos in the U.S. and Latin Americans in their countries of origin.

Dr. Torres is an assistant professor at the University of Houston, Graduate College of Social Work. He delivered an extraordinary lecture on the importance of getting aqcuainted with the growing Hispanic population and the delivery of substance abuse prevention services.

******************************

El 25 de abril de 2013, el “National Hispanic and Latino ATTC” estará presentando al Dr. Luis Torres, miembro de nuestro panel de expertos, académico, e investigador en el área de trastornos de salud mental concurrentes, abuso de sustancias y condiciones médicas, con énfasis en los latinos viviendo en los Estados Unidos y latinoamericanos en sus países de origen.

El Dr. Torres es catedrático auxiliar de la Escuela Graduada de Trabajo Social en la Universidad de Houston. El académico ofreció una lección extraordinaria sobre la importancia de conocer la realidad de la creciente población hispana y el ofrecimiento de servicios en el campo de la prevención del abuso de sustancias.


iTtraining: Meet the National Hispanic and Latino ATTC

ATTC Third Thursday iTraining: Meet the National Hispanic & Latino ATTC from ATTC Network on Vimeo.

Questions and answers about this iTraining

Q&A's

Hispanics and Latinos comprise the largest minority group in the United States. In 2011, there were 52 million Hispanics representing 16.7% of the total U.S. population, a growth of 43% from 2000 to 2010. Yet, this growth rate has not been paralleled by the development of information and services that effectively reach them.  The U.S. Hispanic and Latino populations are facing a public health crisis due to poor or unmet behavioral health needs and access is hindered by the fact that one of every three Hispanics is health-uninsured.

The purpose of this presentation is to get acquainted with the role of the National Hispanic and Latino ATTC, at the same time present a rationale of why providers serving Hispanic and Latino populations in need of substance abuse treatment services need to consider cultural elements in their approaches.