Hot Topics in Health Care for Youth

Webinar Series

Offered in collaboration with members of the Mid-Atlantic Training Collaborative for Health and Human Services (MATCHHS), the U.S. Preventative Service Task Force (USPSTF), and the Region III office of HRSA.
 

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: What is it and how can it be prevented?

September 19, 2017  See below

Screening for Obesity Among Youth

September 22, 2017  See below

Environmental Health Hazards for Children: What providers need to know

September 26, 2017  See below

HPV Vaccination Strategies for Cancer Prevention

September 29, 2017  See below
 
PARTICIPANTS: This webinar series is designed for healthcare and human service providers including physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, nurses, counselors, social workers, case managers, and other staff who interact with patients, who work in multiple types of settings including primary care, geriatric care, maternal and child health care, Head Start programs, STD/HIV & reproductive health care, mental health, addictions, health departments, hospitals, health centers, schools, and community health settings.
 
CONTINUING EDUCATION*
Continuing Education is sponsored by the Institute for Research, Education, and Training on Addiction (IRETA). Applications for continuing education credits have been submitted for the following:
   • ACCME - Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education
   • Health Education – National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc.
   • NAADAC - The Association for Addiction Professionals
   • Social Work - Issued by the University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work
      o   Note: If the application is approved, social work credits will be issued only for a minimum of two hours of participation, plus one-hour increments thereafter.
Detailed information will be shared with registered participants through the provided email address.
* Continuing education will be provided only for synchronous participation on-line or in-person during the event.  Continuing education will not be offered for audio-only participation (i.e., calling-in), nor for viewing or listening to recorded sessions.
 
 

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: What is it and how can it be prevented?

Date: September 19, 2017
DESCRIPTION:
Every 25 minutes, a baby is born suffering from opioid withdrawal. Maternal opioid use and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is dramatically increasing, by nearly five-fold since 2000, providing newborns with greater likelihood of birthweight, respiratory complications, and other critical health conditions. (NIH, 2017). This webinar will describe, review screening and treatment recommendations, and showcase select health programs for managing NAS.
OBJECTIVES:
After participating in this webinar, you will be able to:
  • Develop strategies for implementing evidence-based recommendations for screening and treating pregnant women presenting with substance abuse; and
  • Describe evidence-based practices for managing newborns suffering from neonatal abstinence syndrome.
FACULTY:
Joseph El Khoury, MD
Dr. Joseph El Khoury is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine at the Children’s Hospital of Richmond at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). He is co-chair of the Executive Committee of the Virginia Neonatal Perinatal Collaborative (VNPC), which works to improve health outcomes of mothers and infants. He received his medical degree from The American University of Beirut, Lebanon. He completed his residency in Pediatrics and fellowship in Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine at The Women & Children’s Hospital of Buffalo. In addition to neonatal abstinence syndrome, his areas of interest include neonatal transport, pulmonary disease, and respiratory management.
 

Screening for Obesity Among Youth

Date: September 22, 2017
DESCRIPTION:
Childhood obesity is a serious problem in the United States putting kids at risk for poor health. Approximately 17% (12.7 million) of children and adolescents aged 2-19 years in the United States are obese. Despite recent declines in the prevalence among preschool-aged children, obesity amongst all children is still too high (CDC, 2017). Health and human service providers can have unique opportunities to play a significant role in the prevention of obesity through their work with children, youth and families. The USPSTF recommendation Screening Children and Adolescents for Obesity (U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, 2017) will be reviewed.
OBJECTIVES:
After participating in this webinar, you will be able to:
  • Describe the purpose and work of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force
  • Implement evidence-based recommendations for obesity screening among youth patients
  • Discuss the challenges of implementing USPSTF obesity management recommendations in practice
FACULTY:
John Epling, Jr., MD, MSEd, FAAFP
Dr. John Epling is a professor of Family and Community Medicine at the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine in Roanoke, VA. He is the Medical Director of Research for Family and Community Medicine, is the Medical Director of Employee Health and Wellness for the Carilion Clinic, and maintains an active clinical primary care practice. Dr. Epling joined the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force in January 2016 as a nationally recognized expert in prevention, evidence-based medicine, and primary care. He is serving a four year term on the Task Force. Dr. Epling’s principal research interests include evidence-based medicine and the translation of research into practice, quality improvement and human performance technology, and technology integration in medical education and practice. His clinical research areas of focus include clinical preventive services, such as screening, vaccination, preventive medication, and behavioral risk counseling, as well as intimate partner violence. He has participated in several vaccination-related workgroups on the state and national level.

 

Environmental Health Hazards for Children: What providers need to know

Date: September 26, 2017
DESCRIPTION:
Children are susceptible to many pollutants that can cause both acute disease and chronic developmental concerns. With major exposures propelling environmental pollutants into national news, such as the Flint water crisis, there is no better time to support providers who are the first line of defense children have in recognizing place-based hazards.  This webinar will discuss how health and human service providers can address and be responsive to lead, building materials, asthma triggers, mold, pesticides, and neighborhood exposures.
OBJECTIVES:
After participating in this webinar, you will be able to:
  • Recognize health symptoms from exposure to air or water pollutants
  • Provide screening for environmental health hazards
  • Describe care recommendations for children who have been exposed to environmental toxins
  • Identify authorities to whom place-based hazards can be reported for removal or mitigation
FACULTY:
Laura Anderko, PhD, RN
Dr. Laura Anderko holds the Robert and Kathleen Scanlon Endowed Chair in Values Based Health Care at Georgetown University School of Nursing & Health Studies and serves as Director of the Mid-Atlantic Center for Children’s Health and the Environment (Region III’s Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit, CDC). She is a former member of the Environmental Protection Agency's federal advisory committees: the Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee, the National Drinking Water Advisory Committee, and the National Environmental Justice Advisory Committee’s Research Workgroup. In July 2013, Dr. Anderko was honored by the White House for her work in climate change and public health.

 

HPV Vaccination Strategies for Cancer Prevention

Date: September 29, 2017
DESCRIPTION:
Low HPV vaccination rates are leaving another generation of boys and girls vulnerable to devastating HPV cancers. Vaccination could prevent most of these cancers. CDC is looking to you to make an effective recommendation for HPV vaccination when kids are 11 and 12 years old. Provided in this presentation is up-to-date information on HPV infection/disease, HPV vaccine, and ways to successfully communicate with patients and their parents about HPV vaccination. Find out how to reduce missed opportunities by recommending HPV vaccine the same way and same day you recommend other routinely recommended adolescent vaccines.
OBJECTIVES:
After participating in this webinar, you will be able to:
  • Describe the burden of HPV disease
  • Define the importance of HPV vaccination for cancer prevention
  • Explain the rationale for vaccinating youth at ages 11 or 12
  • List the recommendations for administering the HPV vaccine to girls and to boys
  • Provide useful and compelling information about HPV vaccine to parents to aid in making the decision to vaccinate
  • Locate resources relevant to current immunization practice
FACULTY:
Margot Savoy, M.D., MPH, FAAFP, FABC, CPE, CMQ
Dr. Margot Savoy is the Medical Director of the Christiana Care Health System Department of Family & Community Medicine in Wilmington, Delaware and the State of Delaware Division of Youth Rehabilitative Services.  She is a level 2 faculty member of the Christiana Care Family Medicine and Emergency Medicine/Family Medicine residency programs and Clinical Assistant Professor at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Jefferson University. She is the AAFP liaison to the ACIP, a member of the HPV and Evidence-based medicine ACIP workgroups and active in several immunization groups including Immunization Action Coalition and the National HPV Vaccination Roundtable.

 

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