Improving Care for Substance Use, HIV and/or HCV in Adolescents: Effective Approaches for Assessing, Treating, and Engaging Teens


Adolescents who use alcohol and other drugs are at an increased risk for diseases that are transmitted sexually as well as through the blood, including HIV, and HCV. Substance use treatment can help improve adolescent outcomes but unfortunately, less than 1 in 10 teens with an alcohol or drug use disorder will receive treatment. 

This inaugural conference, held on April 16, 2015, was designed for treatment providers and health care professionals looking to improve the detection and care of adolescents affected by substance use, HIV, and/or HCV.

Based on the conference learning objectives, at the conclusion of the conference, participants were able to:

  • Discuss prior research documenting the prevalence and consequences of untreated or ineffectively treated substance use, HIV, and/or HCV in adolescents.
  • Identify appropriate screening tools and brief interventions to incorporate into their work with adolescents with or at risk of substance use, HIV, and/or HCV in adolescents.
  • Apply at least one evidence-based approach to assessing, treating, or engaging adolescents with or at risk of substance use, HIV, and/or HCV.

 

Resources

Download Power Point Presentations and PDF documents from the 2015 Adolescent Conference:

Adolescent Conference 2015 - SBIRT Panel Questions

Adolescents Hepatitis C Overview

An Overview of HIV and HCV in Adolescents and Young Adults

Assessment, Treatment & Continued Care of Adolescent SUD: Challenges & Opportunities

Substance Monitoring Procedure

Trauma-Informed Approaches to Assessing and Treating Teens

Using Motivational Interviewing with Adolescents

View additional information about the 2015 Adolescent Conference:

Adolescent Conference 2015 - Agenda

Expert Presenter Bios

NIDA Adolescent Publication: 

Principles of Adolescent Substance Use Disorder Treatment: A Research-Based Guide

AIDS.gov Adolescent Publication:

Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Young Persons Who Inject Drugs