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Products and Resources Catalog

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eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The November 2023 issue honors National Native American Heritage Month, National Homelessness Awareness Month, and a brand-new Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy intensive technical assistance opportunity. As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list, so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter and thank you for reading!
Published: November 7, 2023
Multimedia
Presenters: Maya Magarati, PhD, and Angela Gaffney, MPA (Seven Directions) Seven Directions (UW Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences) is hosting the 2023 Our Nations, Our Journeys (ONOJ) conference June 27-29 in Minnesota, a biannual, in-person gathering of 300 tribal and urban Indian public and behavioral health practitioners, leaders, researchers, and Indigenous students focusing on healing from the opioid epidemic. This webinar, presented by Maya Magarati, PhD, and Angela Gaffney, MPA, will outline Seven Directions’ core visions and framework against a backdrop of ONOJ, discuss ways to appropriately engage with Indigenous communities, and spotlight (1) the development and implementation of an Indigenous Evaluation Toolkit for tribal public health programs, and (2) other opioid overdose prevention resources and communities of practice for tribal public health practitioners as facilitated by Seven Directions. Download slides | Watch recording    Webinar keyword: Specific populations
Published: June 8, 2023
Multimedia
Presenters: Paul Hunziker, MA and Lynsey Parrish-Dearth (Northern Cheyenne, Crow, Turtle Mountain Chippewa), MSW, LICSW March 2023 Culture is a part of every interaction a clinical supervisor has with their supervisees, clients and other staff at their agencies. The leadership role that a clinical supervisor plays demands that they feel confident in their skills navigating cultural discussions. This includes working with staff to develop their skills in cultural humility and awareness. Clinical supervisors in training regularly report that having more representative video examples of supervisor skills would be useful. In response to this feedback the Northwest ATTC has created a video series which demonstrates examples of a supervisor working with a supervisee on culturally related issues in their professional development. For this webinar two of the creators of these video demonstrations, Paul Hunziker and Lynsey Parrish-Dearth, will discuss how they incorporated cultural skills-building into the demonstration. Paul and Lynsey also co-teach a tribe focused clinical supervision skills training. During the webinar they will also discuss implications for training supervisors working in tribe-based settings.  Download slides | Watch recording Keywords: Specific populations, workforce development, training, clinical supervision, cultural humility  
Published: April 7, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
The November 2022 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Gaming Addiction | Mental Health: Helping Children Cope with Death & Grief | Prevention: Veterans and Substance Use Prevention | ORN: Native American Heritage Month, and Regional Spotlight: The Recovery Bank. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected].   Sign up to receive the Dialogue and our weekly training bulletin in your mailbox.   Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: November 1, 2022
Multimedia
Alaska presents a unique challenge for access to harm reduction services; prior to 2016 only 3 urban SAPs serviced the state, which includes over 200 tribal villages spread over 650,000 square miles. Since then, innovative strategies such as a local volunteer run syringe access program (SAP) in Homer, a SAP at a rural tribal medical clinic in Bethel, and a mail order tribal harm reduction program out of Anchorage, have greatly expanded access to services throughout the state. Additionally, rural medical clinics offer a critical access point for patients who use drugs to access medications and services to reduce risks and improve their health. This webinar reviewed the barriers to accessing harm reduction services in rural areas, and the strengths and opportunities rural communities have to offer in the development of new harm reduction programs. Presented by Sarah Spencer, DO, FASAM   Webinar keyword: Specific populations
Published: April 29, 2022
Presentation Slides
Slides and handouts: This webinar will explore issues surrounding Indigenous moral, values, and beliefs. These can have a profound affect on the decisions people make on a daily basis. Indigenous morals and values have changed since colonization and can often have negative effects on behavior. Morals, values, and beliefs represent three different aspects of an individual's character and way of life. This webinar will offer an opportunity for participants to share some tools to hep them take back and carry on their cultural morals and values.
Published: December 22, 2021
eNewsletter or Blog
The November 2021 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Native Americans & the Opioid Crisis | Mental Health: Spread Kindness | Prevention: Veterans and Substance Use Prevention | ORN: Mobile Clinics Reach Rural Areas | Spotlight: Dr. Ala Stanford Center for Health Equity (ASHE). Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected]. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox. Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: November 3, 2021
eNewsletter or Blog
Monthly electronic newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.  November 2021 issue features the Counselor's Corner blog, new products from SAMHSA, and a complete calendar of events. 
Published: November 2, 2021
Print Media
  The National American Indian and Alaska Native Addiction Technology Transfer Center would like to share with you Volume 7, Issue 3 of our newsletter, Addressing Addiction in our Native American Communities for Fall 2021: Recovering from Substance Use Disorders During COVID-19. Please take a few moments to explore this issue. It is available at the link below to download.
Published: September 29, 2021
Multimedia
    The Great Lakes ATTC offers this training for behavioral health professionals in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, Oh, and WI. This training is offered in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.   DESCRIPTION: Behavioral health programs that thrive in the future will be those that do the best job of creative an inclusive organization. Staff appreciation, feelings of inclusion, and happiness have a direct impact on quality client care. In this skill-building virtual presentation, participants will learn why cultural humility is a more realistic goal than cultural competence. Topics will include how to help your co-workers feel appreciated, how to have a discussion of differences, microaggressions, micro-insults, and micro-invalidations; and a six- step strategy to repair damage if you insult a co-worker. Join this webinar to learn how to be a diversity change agent in the workplace and create an inclusive organization.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Repair damage if you inadvertently commit a microaggression or insult in the workplace. Help co-workers feel appreciated regardless of differences. Be a diversity change agent. Create an inclusive organization.       TRAINER Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, is the State Project Manager for the Great Lakes ATTC. Mark is also an international speaker, trainer, and consultant in the behavioral health field whose work has reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, Caribbean and British Islands.
Published: August 12, 2021
Presentation Slides
Slides from the May 11, 2021 session, Native American Storytelling: Culture is Prevention. This session featured Robert Begay speaking on "Navajo Woman's Role and its Origin".
Published: May 21, 2021
Toolkit
This resource is designed to provide important talking points to use when meeting with or talking to tribal leaders, elders, community members, multi-disciplinary task force members, or local county workers about substance use disorders (SUD), medication assisted treatment (MAT), and other behavioral health issues. This electronic version is available on our website. We also have a print version. To request copies, please email us at [email protected]
Published: March 18, 2021
Print Media
This optional TA tool is designed to assist Tribal Opioid Response (TOR) grantees that need assistance in developing an implementation plan to organize and guide their grant activities. This TA tool includes three parts: Practical instructions for completing an Implementation Plan A sample Implementation Plan (partially completed) A blank Implementation Plan template for use or adaptation
Published: February 23, 2021
Multimedia
This webinar gives general information to help new TOR grantees get started implementing their grant. 
Published: February 23, 2021
Print Media
This is a list of resources that has been compiled (and continues to be updated) during the National American Indian and Alaska Native ATTC's various listening sessions. This guide is tailored for behavioral health providers who are Native and/or are working with American Indian and Alaska Native individuals. Topics include: general resources, telehealth, resources for children/youth, self-care, staying connected, diversity and equity, and upcoming relevant events. To download this resource guide, please use the "DOWNLOAD" button located above.
Published: November 25, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
Monthly electronic newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.  November 2020 features: Native American Heritage Month, launch of the new Peer Recovery Center of Excellence, and new products: Counselor's Corner, Stigma Basics, and Telehealth Survey Results-Mental Health.   
Published: November 11, 2020
Multimedia
Click the "View Resource" button above to view the recording of the Essential Substance Abuse Series (ESAS) Session: "Clinical Evaluation: Assessment" from November 4th, 2020. 
Published: November 6, 2020
Print Media
Click here to view the handouts for this session with Dr. Garcia. Objectives for this session: Define Assessment Process Identify Assessment Instruments Define DSM-5 criteria for Substance Abuse and Dependence, specifiers and multi-axial assessment Describe ASAM levels of care and diagnostic and dimensional criteria  
Published: November 4, 2020
Multimedia
At the New England ATTC Advisory Board Meeting, guest speaker Lisa Sockabasin, Director of Program & External Affairs at Wabanaki Public Health, presented an inspirational look into the Wabanaki Tribe. Lisa discussed the plans to build two indigenous wellness centers in Main to serve the indigenous population made up of four tribes in the most rural areas in Maine that would connect the population with their culture to support their recovery efforts while integrating their culture and language that is just as important to them as their connection to nature and outdoors.
Published: October 5, 2020
Multimedia
Presenter: Stacy M. Rasmus, PhD, Director of the Center for Alaska Native Health Research at the University of Alaska Fairbanks The Qungasvik (kung-az-vik) "Toolbox" is a multilevel strength-based intervention developed by Yup'ik Alaska Native communities to reduce and prevent alcohol use disorder (AUD) and suicide in youth and young adults at highest risk. During this webinar, Dr. Stacy Rasmus: 1) Described the science to practice model that supported the development and delivery of the culturally-tailored intervention in five Yup’ik communities in southwest Alaska, and 2) Presented evidence demonstrating how the model increases strengths and protections against AUD and suicide by promoting culturally meaningful "reasons for sobriety" and "reasons for life." Download slides | Watch recording Webinar category: Specific populations
Published: October 2, 2020
Print Media
The National American Indian and Alaska Native Addiction Technology Transfer Center would like to share with you Volume 6, Issue 3 of our newsletter, Addressing Addiction in our Native American Communities for Fall 2020. Please take a few moments to explore this issue.
Published: September 28, 2020
Multimedia
Click here to view the recording from the second ESAS session on Treatment Knowledge from 9/16/2020.
Published: September 16, 2020
Print Media
Click here to view the handouts for the ESAS series on Treatment Knowledge that took place on 8/5 and 9/16. 
Published: September 16, 2020
Print Media
Click here to view the handouts for the ESAS: Professional and Ethical Responsibilities session from 8/19/20. 
Published: August 19, 2020
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The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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