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Training and Events Calendar

If a specific training offers a certificate of completion and/or continuing education credits, this will be stated directly in the event description. Please review that information. If questions, please contact the Center hosting the event. To view past events, click here.

Webinar/Virtual Training
Presented by: Rachael Masaitis, Idaho DHW; and Mitch Doig and Erinn McGraw, Northwest ATTC Telehealth has become more common in the healthcare world, but not everyone has access to the technology needed to use it. In Idaho, the Department of Health and Welfare led an initiative to create telehealth pods in libraries and other community spaces to help expand access to care and worked to provide funding, technical assistance, and other supports. In an effort to support these libraries and other telehealth access sites, the Center for Advancing Addiction Health Services (CAAHS) at the UW Addictions, Drug & Alcohol Institute (ADAI) has developed a free online toolkit with the goal of providing information that is crucial to providing safe, supportive, and accessible spaces in community settings where telehealth can be accessed. The toolkit includes sections on: Why telehealth is important How to create spaces that are trauma-informed Stigma related to substance use disorders and mental health Confidentiality and privacy issues How to evaluate your program/project and more! Though the toolkit is targeted at libraries implementing telehealth spaces, it can also provide useful information for clinicians who provide telehealth services and have clients who may be interested in using libraries or other "Third Spaces" for their appointments. Learning objectives: Learn about the history of the efforts in Idaho to implement telehealth pods in public spaces to support access to telehealth. Learn about the key components of the Third Space toolkit, decisions made, and key considerations identified by the CAAHS team. Learn how to navigate, access, and use the toolkit for internal needs or to support advocacy efforts in building partnerships with non-healthcare entities. Join us for this exciting and fun session on May 22nd to not only hear from the team that created the toolkit, but be the FIRST to get a tour of the toolkit itself! It was created using Articulate Rise software, which makes it easy to navigate and use both on desktop and phone -- and it looks pretty awesome, if we do say so ourselves! Looking forward to seeing you there!
Webinar/Virtual Training
  The Northwest ATTC and the Evergreen Council on Problem Gambling (ECPG) are offering 3 workshops on Problem Gambling Integration this May, June, and July 2024. This is session #1: Expectations and Beliefs About Gambling and Gaming. This workshop introduces the series by providing an introduction to Gambling and Gaming for both peers and behavioral health treatment providers. It gives attendees a chance to explore their own views of gambling and gaming, problem gambling/gaming, and relationship with money. The session will provide definitions for the many different terms used in the field of gambling/gaming treatment and recovery as well as define the roles and scope of peers vs. treatment providers. Learning Objectives: Examine your own personal unconscious biases around gambling, gaming, and financial issues Examine fundamentals of gambling and gaming, including definitions, terminologies, prevalence, and common myths and illusions Identify the similarities and differences of peer work and treatment work for Gambling and Gaming Disorders For information on the complete series, download our flyer.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Participants will increase awareness about sexual orientation, gender identity, and how personal biases impede care and ultimately identify how to develop an environment that is LGBT user effective. Trainer: Paul Warren, LMSW Credits: This training meets the requirements for two renewal hours (CASAC, CPP, CPS) and two initial hours (CPP, CPS) through New York State’s Office of Addiction Services and Supports (NYS OASAS). As an IC & RC member board, OASAS accredited courses are granted reciprocal approval by the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee. Many other states offer reciprocity - please check with your accrediting agency. Participants are required to attend the training in its entirety, turn on their video cameras, and actively participate to receive credit.
Online Course
Motivational Interviewing Groups: Moving Together Toward Change Motivational interviewing (MI) is an empathic, goal-oriented therapeutic approach that elicits change in health, mental health, and addictive behaviors.  Originally an alternative to addiction approaches that relied on an expert, authoritarian stance in counseling, MI has evolved into a mainstream, evidence-based, and highly-used method for eliciting change that helps people live better and healthier across a wide variety of settings, clinical problems, and populations. MI was developed as an individual approach, focusing on dyadic interactions between the person and the counselor.  However, adapting MI for use with a group of people requires reconceptualizing its core practices to harness the power of group support, cohesion, and momentum.  Group leadership requires skills beyond those in dyadic counseling.  Managing “conversational traffic” and facilitating open sharing among people with different experiences, goals, styles, and beliefs are essential skills for group leaders.  Effective leaders must be well-prepared to address unexpected situations and maintain therapeutic bonds with individual group members while facilitating a conversation among the whole group. This six-session experiential training provides information on adapting MI to groups across a variety of formats, and is highly experiential, leading participants through group practice exercises across the four phases of MI groups.  This series will incorporate evidence-based practices with the MI modality.  Participants will become part of a group, and some will have opportunities to lead the group.  Incorporating Motivational Interviewing group skills developed by the trainers, this series guides participants in successful group leadership, refocusing groups away from rehashing problems and toward inspiring positive change. WHEN: Weekly sessions offered on the same day and start time between May 28 and July 9, 2024 PT. Day and time will depend on your location. Please locate your local time zone in the table below for your weekly start time.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: At the end of this training experience, participants will be able to: Describe at least two (2) ways to shift from providing individual counseling in a group setting to facilitating group interactions that promote growth and wellness. Specify at least two (2) ways to model a warm, healthy, relaxed, and accepting way of being. Identify at least three (3) strategies to foster a positive group climate while deepening cohesion between members. Assess at least two (2) key elements of the expanded nature of change talk in MI groups. Explain at least two (2) ways to broaden and deepen group conversations for optimal success. Compare at least three (3) strategies to transform group conflict into moments of growth. Specify at least three (3) guided group activities such as exploring values, drawing from past successes, harnessing personal strengths, and envisioning a better future. Design a plan to utilize the three (3) MI strategies of Exploring and Broadening Perspectives, Building Momentum for Change, and Moving into Action. INTENDED AUDIENCE: Behavioral health, substance use disorder, and recovery service providers located in the Pacific Southwest ATTC region (HHS Region 9) Preferably have experience in or access to facilitating groups PARTICIPANT COMMITMENT & EXPECTATIONS To be eligible and register for this series, applicants are required to first complete either (1) an Intro to MI live virtual or face-to-face training offered by the PSATTC or (2) the 4-hour, free self-paced, online course Tour of MI: An Interprofessional Road Map for Behavior Change and submit the electronic copy of your certificate of completion from either of these trainings during the registration process Access to appropriate technology to utilize Zoom videoconferencing platform (internet connection, webcam, laptop/tablet, speakers and microphone) Attend a one-hour online Orientation on May 28, 2024 (refer to chart above for scheduled dates/times in your time zone) Commit to 6-weeks of online training: 5 hours sessions on scheduled series days/time and complete 1.0 hour of weekly self-study learning activities Be prepared and actively engage while on camera 90% of the scheduled series time TRAINER(S)/FACILITATOR(S): Kate Speck, PhD, MAC, LADC Paul Warren, LMSW Amy Shanahan, MS, CADC THERE IS NO COST TO PARTICIPATE: The first 35 registrants will receive a waiver that covers the $350 cost to participate. Once the 35 spots have been filled, registration will be closed. Due to limited enrollment, if you cannot commit to the full requirements, please defer this opportunity to others. Please Note: Registrants enrolled in this series are expected to attend the first TWO sessions. In addition, it is expected that participants will have access to the appropriate technology by Week 2 to fully participate and be on camera at least 90% of the time. This is not a webinar series and active participation to gain/improve skills are required. CONTINUING EDUCATION (CEs/CEHs) This series has been approved for a total of 16 contact hours through the National Association for Addiction Professionals (NAADAC), International Certification & Reciprocity Consortium (IC&RC), and the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC) ACEP No. 6492. UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP) is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. UCLA ISAP maintains responsibility for this program and its content. UCLA ISAP is approved by the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists to sponsor continuing education for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs, and/or LEPs (Provider #64812). UCLA ISAP maintains responsibility for this program/course and its content. Course meets the qualifications for up to sixteen (16) hours of continuing education credits for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCS, and LEPs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. UCLA ISAP is also an approved provider of continuing education for RADTs I/II, CADCs-CASs, CADCs I/II, CADCs-CSs, and LAADCs (CCAPP, #2N-00-445-1125), CATCs (ACCBC/CAADE, #CP40 872 C 0825), and CAODCs (CADTP, #151). Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #15455, for up to 16 contact hours. UNR CASAT is an approved provider of continuing education credit for NCACs I/II and MACs through the National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC, #98165). This program is approved by the Hawaii State Department of Health’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Division (ADAD-AP24-004) for 16.0 education content hours (CPS, CSAC, CCJP, CCS, and CSAPA). CE credit will be awarded at the conclusion of the series for full-session participation. Partial credit will not be available for those participants who arrive at any particular session late or leave early. Make-up work will not be provided or accepted. QUESTIONS: Please contact the NFARtec Workwise Staff at [email protected] or by phone at 775-784-6265 or 866-617-2816 (toll-free).
Webinar/Virtual Training
The New England ATTC in partnership with the Health Education & Training Institute is providing targeted technical assistance in "Motivational Interviewing - Deepening the Practice" on 5/29/24 and 6/5/24 with nationally renowned motivational interviewing (MI) trainer Stephen Andrew. This training deepens skills learned in Motivational Interviewing Foundations. Learners are presented with more in-depth and advanced concepts of motivational interviewing and are given the opportunity to participate in exercises to practice these concepts in order to increase their knowledge and confidence in applying them effectively in their work. Register now!
Online CourseWebinar/Virtual Training
Description This webinar will provide a comprehensive overview of leveraging mobile units to address Substance Use Disorder (SUD) effectively. We will explore the potential of mobile units in both rural and urban settings, offering a range of services from harm reduction initiatives, to Buprenorphine induction, to HIV/STI testing. We will learn how to break down barriers, build community connections, and overcome challenges in implementing SUD services on mobile health units as well as discover practical strategies for billing, program expansion, and staff engagement, all within the context of fostering a supportive and stigma-free environment. Participants will be able to: Identify options and possibilities for mobile units addressing Substance Use Disorder (SUD) in both rural and urban communities. Gain insights into the challenges faced by mobile health units and communities with limited services. Develop a strategic approach to integrate SUD services into existing mobile health units. Discuss methods for overcoming staffing issues and building strong community relationships through mobile unit initiatives.   Guest Speakers   Josh Esrick, MPP  is the Chief of Training and Technical Assistance at Carnevale Associates, LLC. Mr. Esrick has over ten years of experience researching, writing,evaluating, and presenting on substance use prevention and other behavioral health topics.                                                                                                                                              Rebecca Trott, LCSW-C is the Program Manager of the Road to Recovery Program at the Anne Arundel County Department of Health. She oversees the program’s three opioid treatment programs, two located in the community and one located in a correctional center, in addition to an upcoming mobile narcotic treatment program.                                                                                                         Tracy Schulden, LCSW-C is the Deputy Director of Behavioral Health at the Anne Arundel County Department of Health in Annapolis, Maryland. She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with over 32 years of experience working in a variety of treatment settings.
Webinar/Virtual Training
Although Peer Support Specialists are being utilized more and more in the field of Human Services, much of the community and some in the behavioral health field still have the response, “Is that like a sponsor?”. This shows a complete lack of understanding when it comes to the importance, uniqueness, and role of a Peer Support Specialist. Attendees will explore recent data as well as other research collected over the last 20 years showing the effectiveness of Peer Support Specialists. During this presentation, attendees will be provided with information about the role of a Peer Support Specialist and how implementing these services can improve public health and assist individuals in recovery from substance use disorders. The presenter will use lived experience and professional knowledge to facilitate this training. Discuss the history of Peer Support Specialists and the need to educate other addiction professionals about this service. Understand what qualifies someone to be certified as a Peer Support Specialist, the guidelines they follow, and the values they should possess. Understand the role of Peer Support Specialists and how it differs from other addiction professionals Gain knowledge of the effectiveness of Peer Support Specialists and why these unique roles allow them to utilize best practices combined with lived experience.   Michael Crouch is a Certified Peer Support Specialist (CPSS) through Addiction Professionals of SC and has a Bachelor’s in Human Services/Behavioral Health. He has a vast knowledge of peer recovery services and uses lived experience as well as evidence-based practices to help individuals and families affected by substance use disorder (SUD). Michael has experience working in multiple settings such as outpatient treatment, office-based opioid treatment, overdose follow-ups with emergency services, managing an ARCO and CAPRSS Recovery Community Center, training for PSS certification, and is currently positioned as a Peer Recovery Coordinator with Prisma Health Addiction Medicine Center. Michael is passionate about advocating for those who have been marginalized by society due to the stigma of living with a substance use disorder. He is a strong believer in strength-based, person-centered, and trauma-informed approaches to treating substance use disorders and other mental health conditions.
Face-to-Face Training
SBIRT (Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment) is an evidence-based practice that uses a preventive public health approach to identify and intervene with persons whose pattern of use put them at risk for or are experiencing substance-related health and psychosocial problems. SBIRT can also be useful in identifying those with a high likelihood for a substance use disorder. As an effective intervention, SBIRT helps to reduce harmful levels of substance use in health and behavioral health settings.  This interactive (role plays, videos, large group activities) 12-hour training will provide an extensive review of validated substance use screening tools and will include skills practice focused on the brief intervention and a review of essential components of successful referrals to treatment.  Trainer Diana Padilla, MCPC, CARC, CASAC-T
Webinar/Virtual Training
The New England ATTC in partnership with the Massachusetts Re-Entry Community Resources for Justice is hosting this four-part targeted TA series in "Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for Substance Use and Co-occurring Disorders" on 6/3, 6/10, 6/18, and 6/24 with subject matter expert Taylor D'Addario. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a cognitive behavioral treatment that was originally developed to treat chronically suicidal individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and it is now recognized as the gold standard psychological treatment for this population. In addition, research has shown that it is effective in treating substance use disorders and a wide range of co-occurring mental health disorders such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and eating disorders. [This is a private, targeted technical assistance (TA) event.  If you are interested in similar TA, please contact [email protected]]
Virtual TA Session
Are you looking to discuss how you can enhance your Clinical Supervision Skills? Join us every 1st Tuesday of the month (9am PT, 8am AKT, 10am MT) to learn from other practicing professionals and receive consultation from Paul Hunziker MA, LMFT, SUDP and Lynsey Parrish (Northern Cheyenne, Crow, Turtle Mountain Chippewa), MSW, LICSW. These monthly consultation sessions will be open to all workforce members within Region 10 (Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington) who have completed the Northwest ATTC Clinical Supervision training series. The sessions will be an opportunity to discuss implementation of the Clinical Supervision model and discuss successes and challenges you may be experiencing.
Webinar/Virtual Training
The New England ATTC in partnership with the Community Care Alliance of Rhode Island is hosting this training on 6/4/24 and 6/11/24 from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm with subject matter expert Taylor D'Addario. This interactive and experiential presentation offers an overview of the impact of trauma on the recovery process from a social, biological, psychological, and spiritual perspective and will provide clinicians with skills to work with people affected by trauma throughout their recovery, as well as, understanding the conceptual framework of trauma-informed practice. [This is a private, targeted technical assistance (TA) event.  If you are interested in similar TA, please contact [email protected]]
Webinar/Virtual Training
Humor is a part of daily living that has been shown to improve mental, physical, and emotional health. Laughter can bring us through some of the darkest times when hope seems glim. Despite the benefits and need for laughter and humor, helping professionals are taught very little about the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery. In fact, it is sometimes discouraged in the helping professions. In this presentation you will learn strategies to incorporate humor in your work with clients.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By the end of this presentation, you will be able to: Understand the research on the benefits of using humor to improve physical, mental and emotional health Use humor more effectively in your work with clients Use humor to improve rapport with clients and to help clients grow in recovery Use humor to help reduce burnout and increase organizational morale   CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this webinar will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event.   PRESENTERS: Tom Farley Tom Farley grew up in Madison, WI and graduated from Georgetown University with a degree in Marketing.  He began his career in banking and finance, living and working in the New York City area.  From 1999 to 2012, he ran The Chris Farley Foundation, a nationally recognized non-profit dedicated to substance abuse prevention. Like his brother, Tom was successful in opening the “eyes and ears” of youth audiences through the powerful and effective use of humor.  In 2008 he wrote “The Chris Farley Show”, a New York Time bestselling biography of his late brother, the actor and comedian Chris Farley.  He has been interviewed on The Today Show, Good Morning America, Larry King Live, Fox News and The View. He has also been featured in People Magazine, USA Today and several national and regional newspapers and publications. Tom has served on the Dane County Human Services board and several non-profit boards. Tom works for Rosecrance Behavioral Health as the Professional Relations Coordinator for Wisconsin. He is also a motivational speaker, delivering messages on prevention and recovery. Tom lives in Madison, WI.   Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, is the Illinois state project manager for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. He is an international speaker and behavioral health consultant whose presentations and publications have reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, West Indies, Lithuania, and Guam. He is the recipient of four lifetime achievement awards, including NAADAC’s prestigious Enlightenment Award, the National Association for Addiction Professionals’ 50th Anniversary Legends Award, the Illinois Certification Board's Professional of the Year Award and Jessica Hayes Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Barbara Bacon Award for outstanding contributions to the social work profession as an alumnus of Loyola University of Chicago.  Mark is the author of five books on behavioral health recovery. Recent writings include Slipping Through the Cracks: Intervention Strategies for Clients with Multiple Addictions Disorders and Relationship Detox: A Counselors Guide To Helping Clients Develop Healthy Relationships In Recovery. His groundbreaking monograph, Recovery Management, co-authored with historians William White and Earnest Kurtz, helped shift substance use disorders treatment and recovery from the acute care model towards a recovery-oriented system of care. Mark is the primary contributing author of a trauma-informed gun violence prevention curriculum which is now being implemented in several large cities throughout the U.S., and he authored two stories published in the New York Times bestselling Chicken Soup for The Soul book series. In addition to his behavioral healthcare work, Mark has a 30-year career as a university educator, having taught at The University of Chicago, Loyola University of Chicago, and Illinois State University School of Social Work. He is also the co-founder of Serenity Academy Chicago, a program which sponsors recovery-oriented peer groups in local high schools.   The Great Lakes A/MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
The Northwest ATTC and the Evergreen Council on Problem Gambling (ECPG) are offering 3 workshops on Problem Gambling Integration this May, June, and July 2024. This is session #2: Comparisons of Mental Health, Substance Use Disorders, Gambling Disorder, and Gaming Disorder This session is the second in a series on problem gambling/gaming, though it can be attended on its own. It will provide a comparison of similarities and differences of substance use disorders vs. gambling/gaming disorders, including diagnostic criteria and help services/resources. It will also compare the neurobiological impacts of gambling and gaming and special considerations for the spectrum of recreational gambling/gaming to addictive disorders. Learning Objectives: List special considerations that make gambling and gaming unique from other addictive disorders Compare diagnostic criteria and available help services for various behavioral health concerns Examine similarities in neurobiology of gambling and gaming disorders in relation to substance use disorders For information on the complete series, download our flyer.
Face-to-Face Training
The New England ATTC in partnership with the Health Education & Training Institute is providing targeted TA in “Foundational Motivational Interviewing” on 6/6/24 and 6/14/24  with nationally renowned motivational interviewing (MI) trainer Stephen Andrew. MI is a client-centered, evidence-based method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence. This two-day training will introduce how to use MI with patients with substance use and mental health diagnoses. Participants will have extensive opportunities to practice integrating MI techniques into a range of therapeutic interventions. Register now!!
Webinar/Virtual Training
The Mountain Plains ATTC is starting off Pride Month with a presentation to provide foundational knowledge to enhance your work with a diverse population. This webinar is designed to further develop understanding of LGBTQIA2S+ allyship and move toward solidarity. The session aims to help participants identify inclusive practices, skills, and resources to support LGBTQIA2S+ communities and demonstrating a commitment to the practice of allyship. Bio: Dr. Jeff Maliskey (he/him) is the Director for the Pride Center at the University of North Dakota. His work focuses on LGBTQIA2S+ identity support, gender and sexuality education, and advocacy. Dr. Maliskey brings over a decade of student affairs experience working with student affinity-based resources and support centers. As a first-generation, LGBTQ+ scholar, Dr. Jeff Maliskey understands the unique challenges that impact student success in relation to identity. His practice is student-centered, and justice based as means to work towards equity and inclusion in higher education.
Webinar/Virtual Training
This series consists of three webinars where attendees will learn from existing programs how a joint community/provider-led Recovery-Oriented System of Care (ROSC) can empower and positively impact America's growing mental health and substance use challenges.   Session 1: June 6, 2024 12:00 PM–2:00 PM CT/ 1:00 PM–3:00 PM ET Session 1 of this 3-part series will begin by reviewing core definitions, learning key principles, and identifying the "planks" of success when establishing a ROSC as an "organizing construct" to all community health care and wellness services. Other central themes that will be shared are best practices for attaining and sustaining community involvement and lessons learned while building, maintaining, and evaluating the "community up" model of care. Examples of specific lived experiences will also be presented—in particular, the implementation of a recovery-focused care system in Hancock County, Ohio, as highlighted in SAMHSA's TIP 65.   Intended Audience: State and County governmental organizing and policy leaders; providers, those in recovery, families and general community.   CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.   TRAINERS:   Dr. Flaherty is a clinical psychologist with more than 42 years of practice. In 1999 he founded the Institute for Research, Education and Training in the Addictions (IRETA) in Pittsburgh. Prior, he was the head of Institute for Psychiatry and Addiction at the St. Francis Health System in Pittsburgh. While at St. Francis, in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, he co-led these institutions in the creation of what is today Pennsylvania’s largest non-profit behavioral managed care company, Community Care Behavioral Health. He has authored over 26 Federal and Foundational grants and more than 50 published articles, chapters and monographs on topics related to substance use policy, prevention, treatment, and recovery. A pioneering and visionary leader in the science of recovery, he has spoken in 42 states on recovery focused care. A past adviser to the White House Office National Drug Control, he assisted in the development of early brief substance use screening and intervention (2003/Tap 33, SBIRT, 2013), the first White House Overdose Prevention Plan (2015), as co-leader and facilitator of W. Pennsylvania’s initial Overdose Strategy (2017), and in the design of Pennsylvania’s in its Overdose Plan (Commonwealth, 2018). Today he continues to focus on clinical practice, workforce challenges (Annapolis Coalition) and designing recovery focused models of behavioral health. His work is featured in SAMHSA’s recently published TIP 65, Counseling Approaches to Promote Recovery from Problematic Substance Use and Related Issues (2023). Dr. Flaherty is a retired Captain (Surface Warfare) in the U.S. Naval Reserve with 27 years’ service. He holds B.A. degrees in Philosophy and Psychology from the Pennsylvania State University; and a M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Duquesne University. He is especially proud of his 3 adult children and 5 grandsons. Zach Thomas is an Ohio Certified Prevention Specialist and the Director of Wellness and Education at the Hancock County Board of Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services. He is responsible for the coordination and management of the Hancock County Community Partnership and Community Coalition on Addiction which are long-standing coalitions focused on substance use prevention and mental health promotion. Zach manages the Board’s prevention interests, public relations, and leads work in cultural humility and health equity. In 2021, he was hired by the University of Findlay to serve as the Lead Strategist for the Center for Civic Engagement which serves as a backbone entity that provides support to seven other community-based coalitions in Hancock County. Precia Stuby is the Executive Director of the Hancock County Board of Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services (ADAMHS), a position she has held since 1997. Ms. Stuby holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree in social work from Ohio State University. Ms. Stuby is a Licensed Independent Social Worker, a graduate of the Hancock Leadership Program and the Mental Health Executive Leadership Program at Case Western Reserve University. She received the Leadership Award from Ohio NAMI, was named Public Health Champion of the Year by the Findlay City Health Department, is the Past Board President for the Ohio Association of County Behavior Health Authorities, has a published interview by William White on Recovery Management and is the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Northwest Ohio Chapter of the National Association of Social Work, the Athena Leadership Award and the Association of Leadership Programs Distinguished Leadership Award. Her current community Involvement includes serving on the governing Boards of the Center for Civic Engagement and Welcome to a New Life. She is also a member of the Opiate and Other Addictions Coalition, and the Findlay Rotary Club. Since 2013, Precia has been leading the ROSC Transformation for Hancock County. She completed ROSC Leadership Training Institute sponsored by the Great Lakes ATTC with Dr. Ijeoma Achara in 2002; participated in the ROSC Thought Leaders Summit in 2016; and completed a ROSC Training of Trainers in 2016. She has presented her work at the state and national level. Mee Lee Kim is a Research Scientist within the Institute for Behavioral Health at Brandeis University.  She has nineteen years of experience conducting research and evaluation using mixed methods. She applies a participatory action approach when working with community-based organizations and other community stakeholders. She is the Brandeis Principal Investigator of multiple federally funded projects to address or prevent substance misuse and improve mental health by building community capacity to address underlying risk factors while fostering protective factors. These projects include an expansion of a Systems of Care Model for Children/Youth with serious emotional disturbance, Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic to integrate health and behavioral health services, enhancements to peer recovery support services, and improving access to services for youth and families with traumatic stress. She serves as the Brandeis Principal Investigator of the School-based Telebehavioral Health Pilot Project in partnership with the Brookline Center for Community Mental Health and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. She also has ten years of experience working with state administrators to enhance Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMPs) as a public health and clinical decision-making tool. Ginny Williams is a dynamic leader and Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor based in Ohio, recognized for her expertise in driving transformative change within organizations. With a diverse background spanning various roles, Ginny brings a wealth of experience to her current position as Chief Culture & Transformation Officer for Family Resource Center, a $17 million community behavioral health organization. Ginny's journey in mental health began as a prevention specialist, evolving into direct service provision encompassing emergency services, individual and group counseling, with a clinical focus on grief and loss. Her commitment to professional development led her to obtain an Advanced Grief Recovery Specialist credential from the Grief Recovery Institute, further enhancing her ability to support individuals navigating challenging life transitions. Prior to her current role, Ginny held positions including Assistant Director of Counseling Services and adjunct faculty member in the Psychology Department at The University of Findlay. Her tenure as Director of Adult Clinical Services and Chief Clinical Officer for Family Resource Center underscored her adeptness in managing clinical operations and driving organizational growth. In her current capacity, Ginny is instrumental in reshaping organizational cultures and driving strategic initiatives aimed at enhancing employee engagement and organizational effectiveness. Her expertise in talent optimization as a Predictive Index Practioner, strategic planning, and collaborative relationship-building has been instrumental in introducing innovative services and programs to address community needs effectively. Her specialties include designing comprehensive leadership development programs, fostering a culture of growth and adaptability, and driving organizational performance through effective leadership and talent management strategies. Nichole Coleman is the County Veterans Service Officer/Executive Director Hancock County Veterans Service Office.  Under her leadership, the office has served more than eight times the number of veterans annually and increased the VA expenditures by more than $16.8 million for county veterans and their family members. Additionally, five innovative veteran resiliency programs were created to provide mental health support, additional recovery tools, and improved quality of life.         Register for the upcoming webinars in this series! Session 2: July 11, 2024 12:00 PM–2:00 PM CT/ 1:00 PM–3:00 PM ET Finding the workforce to address the needs of the community and build a locally defined ROSC is critical to its success. As a ROSC, new opportunities for an expanded workforce emerge. This webinar will tie this critical element of creating a workforce based on the actual community needs to a regionally assessed and defined system of care. The presenters will share ways of finding professional/peer workers for all segments and levels of the continuum of care, education-informed prevention-intervention-treatment-recovery, methods to locate community resources to develop and retain their ROSC workforce, and some of the lessons learned in the process of building an integrated and effective coalition.   Session 3: August 15, 2024 12:00 PM–2:00 PM CT/ 1:00 PM–3:00 PM ET Within a ROSC, process is as important as outcome. Sustaining a community/provider ROSC will depend on community ownership of the challenges they may face when maintaining a balanced approach to the relevant processes and outcomes. In this third and final webinar of the ROSC series, the presenters will review those ways to keep the community invested in its ROSC and the outcomes of a ROSC in Hancock County and elsewhere. They will also discuss specific recovery programs for high-risk populations (i.e. veterans, harm reduction, pregnant women/infants, overdose prevention, those in recovery, youth).  
Face-to-Face Training
The effects of trauma and toxic stress can be noted in the family system when a member is actively using substances. The impact and stigma of substance use can create barriers for family members and providers to recognize and discuss life stressors including risky substance use. Eliciting unique and intimate details of these challenges from clients/patients is key to meeting behavioral health needs, and just as important when supporting family members at risk. This presentation will review co-occurring toxic stress and trauma in the context of family wellness and how providers can create a safe space to approach sensitive topics. The content will further inform on family engagement techniques that highlight person-centered, trauma-informed strategies using recovery-oriented language to build trust and rapport. Trainer: Diana Padilla, MCPC, CARC, CASAC-T
Face-to-Face Training
The New England ATTC in partnership with the Health Education & Training Institute is providing targeted technical assistance in Motivational Interviewing and the Power of Groups on 6/11/24 with nationally renowned motivational interviewing (MI) trainer Stephen Andrew. Using Motivational Interviewing in a therapeutic support group format is highly effective and provides several important steps that help break isolation. This training provides information on issues and treatment of special populations (adolescents, dual diagnosis, addiction, intimacy, low-income families, parents, etc.) through the use of support groups in treatment. In addition to the role of group leader, the roles of the participants will be discussed and compared in various types of group settings, as well as the importance of therapeutic contracts, goal setting, and group frequency duration, course, and process. [This is a private, targeted technical assistance (TA) event.  If you are interested in similar TA please contact [email protected]]
Face-to-Face Training
The New England ATTC in partnership with the Health Education & Training Institute is providing targeted technical assistance in Advancing Your Group Practice Using Motivational Interviewing on 6/11/24 with nationally renowned motivational interviewing (MI) trainer Stephen Andrew. Using Motivational Interviewing in a therapeutic support group format is highly effective and provides several important steps that help break isolation. Training objectives are 1) to define the different types of groups and to understand the effectiveness of groups; 2) to identify an effective  group work strategy for different group problems; 3) to learn a model of the process of change in group work and to anticipate potential pitfalls as a group leader; and 4) to understand the consumer's reactions to groups and the effects those reactions have on the group as a whole.  [This is a private, targeted technical assistance (TA) event.  If you are interested in similar TA please contact [email protected]]
Face-to-Face Training
The New England ATTC in partnership with the Health Education & Training Institute is providing targeted technical assistance in Advancing Your Group Practice Using Motivational Interviewing on 6/11/24 with nationally renowned motivational interviewing (MI) trainer Stephen Andrew. Using Motivational Interviewing in a therapeutic support group format is highly effective and provides several important steps that help break isolation. Training objectives are 1) to define the different types of groups and to understand the effectiveness of groups; 2) to identify an effective  group work strategy for different group problems; 3) to learn a model of the process of change in group work and to anticipate potential pitfalls as a group leader; and 4) to understand the consumer's reactions to groups and the effects those reactions have on the group as a whole.  [This is a private, targeted technical assistance (TA) event.  If you are interested in similar TA please contact [email protected]]
Webinar/Virtual Training
We have another offering taking place on June 25, 2024! This training is intended for any provider who is caring for or in contact with LGBT individuals, including mental health and substance use disorder clinicians, HIV healthcare providers, government employees, primary care providers, public health practitioners, prevention specialists, community-based organizations, educators, and school-based care providers and staff. The training includes an introduction to key terms and concepts (such as gender identity and sexual orientation), treatment considerations for clinical work, and addressing the specific needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Recall two (2) factors that might contribute to substance use among LGBT clients. Identify two (2) barriers for health screening and medical care for LGBT clients. Recognize two (2) health issues/behaviors for which LGBT clients have a higher risk. Identify two (2) strategies service providers can implement to create affirming environments for LGBT people. Specify one (1) treatment approach that has been shown effective with LGBT populations. Explain the concept of “cultural humility” and theorize one (1) way that it differs from “cultural competency.” Analyze two (2) strategies for creating culturally affirming interactions.     CERTIFICATES: Those who fully attend will be eligible to receive 3 NAADAC continuing education (CE) hours. NAADAC CE certificates will be sent to qualifying participants via email within 1-2 weeks after the conclusion of the training.     TRAINERS:   Tom Freese is the Director of Training, UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs; Director, Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center, HHS Region 9; Co-Director           Grant Hovik, MA is a Trainer and Online Curriculum Developer, UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and the Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center           The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
This is a beginner friendly, data focused training that covers LGBTQ+ identity, outcomes, and increasing patient engagement in services. The training will give participants a broad understanding of LGBTQ+ culture, demographic terms, the data on population experiences, and tools that can be used in patient care and within an organization as a whole. The training will make individuals more comfortable and confident when interacting with and treating LGBTQ+ communities. Goals/objectives: • Identify the barriers LGBTQ+ Patients encounter when accessing health care services • Increase understanding of LGBTQ+ populations and cultural history especially as it relates to substance use • Cite existing tools and process improvement strategies related to providing services for LGBTQ+ patients BIO: Faye Seidler is an award winning advocate that specializes in suicide prevention, LGBTQ+ populations, and state data. She was born and raised in North Dakota and has a decade of experience in community organizing, public speaking, and professional development training. She is known for connecting and uplifting others, bringing communities together, and always keeping hope in focus.
Webinar/Virtual Training
The New England ATTC in partnership with the Massachusetts Bureau of Substance Addiction Services is providing intensive technical assistance in "Intermediate Motivational Interviewing" on 6/12/24 and 6/13/24 from 9:00 am to 12:15 pm with subject matter expert Robert Jope. Motivational Interviewing is a client-centered, evidence-based, goal-oriented method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence with the individual. This active, skill-building workshop provides participants with a review of the spirit and micro skills of MI, and focuses on using the strategies of the model to elicit change talk in conversation. Participants will integrate the spirit, skills, and strategies in practice conversations, and are encouraged to attend the Advanced MI workshop to develop proficiency in this method.  [This is a private, targeted technical assistance (TA) event.  If you are interested in similar TA please contact [email protected]]
Webinar/Virtual Training
Substance Use Disorder affects the LGBTQ community at a higher rate than the general population. Unique challenges like stigma, shame, and lack of support can impede access to treatment. As a service provider, it's important to create a welcoming and accepting environment, reduce stigma, and tailor treatments to the needs of LGBTQ individuals. Abstinence based recovery may be the key for some, where harm-reduction strategies may be more appropriate for others. By providing culturally competent treatment, we increase our clients’ chances of achieving lasting recovery. Objectives: Educate Substance Use Disorder (SUD) providers on the unique challenges faced by LGBTQ+ individuals with SUD Describe effective methods for treating and connecting with LGBTQ+ clients Learn to provide effective and culturally competent treatment to the LGBTQ+ population Presenter Information: Darla Belflower LCSW, CPS has worked in leadership in the substance use disorder and behavioral health fields for over three decades. She is currently the Clinical Director at Healing House. She has a passion for teaching others what she has learned in those years. She is Vice Chair of the KC Recovery Coalition, serves on the board of the MO Coalition of Recovery Support Providers and is a member of The MO Department of Mental Health State Advisory Council. Darla obtained her MSW from the KU, and she has a BS in Psychology and Alcohol and Drug Studies from MO Valley College. Darla is a person in recovery and author of the book, “I Am Not Anonymous.” This training has been approved for 1-hour by the Missouri Credentialing Board and the Iowa Board of Certification. Please email Bree at [email protected] for any questions.
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