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Training and Events Calendar

If a specific training offers a certificate of completion and/or continuing education credits, this will be stated directly in the event description. Please review that information. If questions, please contact the Center hosting the event. To view past events, click here.

Face-to-Face Training
Data sources estimate that between 25 to 75% of people who survive different forms of abuse and/or a violent trauma develop issues related to substance use. Despite the prevalence of trauma, it often goes undetected particularly in people already dealing with life challenges and at high risk of substance use, misuse, and mental health problems. This interactive training will review variations of trauma and potential impacts on the mind, and how self-regulation techniques can help address traumatic reactions. The content will further discuss practice specific opportunities for integration of trauma-informed care principles and during various points of client interactions. Providers will learn how trauma-informed care provides a preventive approach to engagement and supports person-centered care. Trainer: Diana Padilla, MCPC, CARC, CASAC-T
Face-to-Face Training
SBIRT (Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment) is an evidence-based practice that uses a preventive public health approach to identify and intervene with persons whose pattern of use put them at risk for or are experiencing substance-related health and psychosocial problems. SBIRT can also be useful in identifying those with a high likelihood for a substance use disorder. As an effective intervention, SBIRT helps to reduce harmful levels of substance use in health and behavioral health settings.  This interactive (role plays, videos, large group activities) 12-hour training will provide an extensive review of validated substance use screening tools and will include skills practice focused on the brief intervention and a review of essential components of successful referrals to treatment.  Trainer Diana Padilla, MCPC, CARC, CASAC-T
Webinar/Virtual Training
The New England ATTC in partnership with the Massachusetts Re-Entry Community Resources for Justice is hosting this four-part targeted TA series in "Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for Substance Use and Co-occurring Disorders" on 6/3, 6/10, 6/18, and 6/24 with subject matter expert Taylor D'Addario. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a cognitive behavioral treatment that was originally developed to treat chronically suicidal individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and it is now recognized as the gold standard psychological treatment for this population. In addition, research has shown that it is effective in treating substance use disorders and a wide range of co-occurring mental health disorders such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and eating disorders. [This is a private, targeted technical assistance (TA) event.  If you are interested in similar TA, please contact [email protected]]
Virtual TA Session
Are you looking to discuss how you can enhance your Clinical Supervision Skills? Join us every 1st Tuesday of the month (9am PT, 8am AKT, 10am MT) to learn from other practicing professionals and receive consultation from Paul Hunziker MA, LMFT, SUDP and Lynsey Parrish (Northern Cheyenne, Crow, Turtle Mountain Chippewa), MSW, LICSW. These monthly consultation sessions will be open to all workforce members within Region 10 (Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington) who have completed the Northwest ATTC Clinical Supervision training series. The sessions will be an opportunity to discuss implementation of the Clinical Supervision model and discuss successes and challenges you may be experiencing.
Webinar/Virtual Training
The New England ATTC in partnership with the Community Care Alliance of Rhode Island is hosting this training on 6/4/24 and 6/11/24 from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm with subject matter expert Taylor D'Addario. This interactive and experiential presentation offers an overview of the impact of trauma on the recovery process from a social, biological, psychological, and spiritual perspective and will provide clinicians with skills to work with people affected by trauma throughout their recovery, as well as, understanding the conceptual framework of trauma-informed practice. [This is a private, targeted technical assistance (TA) event.  If you are interested in similar TA, please contact [email protected]]
Webinar/Virtual Training
Humor is a part of daily living that has been shown to improve mental, physical, and emotional health. Laughter can bring us through some of the darkest times when hope seems glim. Despite the benefits and need for laughter and humor, helping professionals are taught very little about the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery. In fact, it is sometimes discouraged in the helping professions. In this presentation you will learn strategies to incorporate humor in your work with clients.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By the end of this presentation, you will be able to: Understand the research on the benefits of using humor to improve physical, mental and emotional health Use humor more effectively in your work with clients Use humor to improve rapport with clients and to help clients grow in recovery Use humor to help reduce burnout and increase organizational morale   CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this webinar will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event.   PRESENTERS: Tom Farley Tom Farley grew up in Madison, WI and graduated from Georgetown University with a degree in Marketing.  He began his career in banking and finance, living and working in the New York City area.  From 1999 to 2012, he ran The Chris Farley Foundation, a nationally recognized non-profit dedicated to substance abuse prevention. Like his brother, Tom was successful in opening the “eyes and ears” of youth audiences through the powerful and effective use of humor.  In 2008 he wrote “The Chris Farley Show”, a New York Time bestselling biography of his late brother, the actor and comedian Chris Farley.  He has been interviewed on The Today Show, Good Morning America, Larry King Live, Fox News and The View. He has also been featured in People Magazine, USA Today and several national and regional newspapers and publications. Tom has served on the Dane County Human Services board and several non-profit boards. Tom works for Rosecrance Behavioral Health as the Professional Relations Coordinator for Wisconsin. He is also a motivational speaker, delivering messages on prevention and recovery. Tom lives in Madison, WI.   Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, is the Illinois state project manager for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. He is an international speaker and behavioral health consultant whose presentations and publications have reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, West Indies, Lithuania, and Guam. He is the recipient of four lifetime achievement awards, including NAADAC’s prestigious Enlightenment Award, the National Association for Addiction Professionals’ 50th Anniversary Legends Award, the Illinois Certification Board's Professional of the Year Award and Jessica Hayes Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Barbara Bacon Award for outstanding contributions to the social work profession as an alumnus of Loyola University of Chicago.  Mark is the author of five books on behavioral health recovery. Recent writings include Slipping Through the Cracks: Intervention Strategies for Clients with Multiple Addictions Disorders and Relationship Detox: A Counselors Guide To Helping Clients Develop Healthy Relationships In Recovery. His groundbreaking monograph, Recovery Management, co-authored with historians William White and Earnest Kurtz, helped shift substance use disorders treatment and recovery from the acute care model towards a recovery-oriented system of care. Mark is the primary contributing author of a trauma-informed gun violence prevention curriculum which is now being implemented in several large cities throughout the U.S., and he authored two stories published in the New York Times bestselling Chicken Soup for The Soul book series. In addition to his behavioral healthcare work, Mark has a 30-year career as a university educator, having taught at The University of Chicago, Loyola University of Chicago, and Illinois State University School of Social Work. He is also the co-founder of Serenity Academy Chicago, a program which sponsors recovery-oriented peer groups in local high schools.   The Great Lakes A/MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
The Northwest ATTC and the Evergreen Council on Problem Gambling (ECPG) are offering 3 workshops on Problem Gambling Integration this May, June, and July 2024. This is session #2: Comparisons of Mental Health, Substance Use Disorders, Gambling Disorder, and Gaming Disorder This session is the second in a series on problem gambling/gaming, though it can be attended on its own. It will provide a comparison of similarities and differences of substance use disorders vs. gambling/gaming disorders, including diagnostic criteria and help services/resources. It will also compare the neurobiological impacts of gambling and gaming and special considerations for the spectrum of recreational gambling/gaming to addictive disorders. Learning Objectives: List special considerations that make gambling and gaming unique from other addictive disorders Compare diagnostic criteria and available help services for various behavioral health concerns Examine similarities in neurobiology of gambling and gaming disorders in relation to substance use disorders For information on the complete series, download our flyer.
Face-to-Face Training
The New England ATTC in partnership with the Health Education & Training Institute is providing targeted TA in “Foundational Motivational Interviewing” on 6/6/24 and 6/14/24  with nationally renowned motivational interviewing (MI) trainer Stephen Andrew. MI is a client-centered, evidence-based method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence. This two-day training will introduce how to use MI with patients with substance use and mental health diagnoses. Participants will have extensive opportunities to practice integrating MI techniques into a range of therapeutic interventions. Register now!!
Webinar/Virtual Training
Professional boundaries set the parameters of effective and appropriate interaction between professionals and the people they serve. Boundaries protect clients and patients as well as providers. This interactive course will discuss professionalism and ethics, dual relationships, and how to build a safe working environment. Trainer: Paul Warren, LMSW Credits: This training has been approved for two renewal hours (CASAC, CPP, CPS) and two initial hours (CPP, CPS) through New York State’s Office of Addiction Services and Supports (NYS OASAS). As an IC & RC member board, OASAS accredited courses are granted reciprocal approval by the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee. Many other states offer reciprocity - please check with your accrediting agency. Participants are required to attend the ENTIRE training, turn on their video cameras and actively participate in order to receive a Certificate of Completion.  
Webinar/Virtual Training
This series consists of three webinars where attendees will learn from existing programs how a joint community/provider-led Recovery-Oriented System of Care (ROSC) can empower and positively impact America's growing mental health and substance use challenges.   Session 1: June 6, 2024 12:00 PM–2:00 PM CT/ 1:00 PM–3:00 PM ET Session 1 of this 3-part series will begin by reviewing core definitions, learning key principles, and identifying the "planks" of success when establishing a ROSC as an "organizing construct" to all community health care and wellness services. Other central themes that will be shared are best practices for attaining and sustaining community involvement and lessons learned while building, maintaining, and evaluating the "community up" model of care. Examples of specific lived experiences will also be presented—in particular, the implementation of a recovery-focused care system in Hancock County, Ohio, as highlighted in SAMHSA's TIP 65.   Intended Audience: State and County governmental organizing and policy leaders; providers, those in recovery, families and general community.   CERTIFICATES: Registrants who fully attend this event or training will receive a certificate of attendance via email within two weeks after the event or training.   TRAINERS:   Dr. Flaherty is a clinical psychologist with more than 42 years of practice. In 1999 he founded the Institute for Research, Education and Training in the Addictions (IRETA) in Pittsburgh. Prior, he was the head of Institute for Psychiatry and Addiction at the St. Francis Health System in Pittsburgh. While at St. Francis, in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, he co-led these institutions in the creation of what is today Pennsylvania’s largest non-profit behavioral managed care company, Community Care Behavioral Health. He has authored over 26 Federal and Foundational grants and more than 50 published articles, chapters and monographs on topics related to substance use policy, prevention, treatment, and recovery. A pioneering and visionary leader in the science of recovery, he has spoken in 42 states on recovery focused care. A past adviser to the White House Office National Drug Control, he assisted in the development of early brief substance use screening and intervention (2003/Tap 33, SBIRT, 2013), the first White House Overdose Prevention Plan (2015), as co-leader and facilitator of W. Pennsylvania’s initial Overdose Strategy (2017), and in the design of Pennsylvania’s in its Overdose Plan (Commonwealth, 2018). Today he continues to focus on clinical practice, workforce challenges (Annapolis Coalition) and designing recovery focused models of behavioral health. His work is featured in SAMHSA’s recently published TIP 65, Counseling Approaches to Promote Recovery from Problematic Substance Use and Related Issues (2023). Dr. Flaherty is a retired Captain (Surface Warfare) in the U.S. Naval Reserve with 27 years’ service. He holds B.A. degrees in Philosophy and Psychology from the Pennsylvania State University; and a M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Duquesne University. He is especially proud of his 3 adult children and 5 grandsons. Zach Thomas is an Ohio Certified Prevention Specialist and the Director of Wellness and Education at the Hancock County Board of Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services. He is responsible for the coordination and management of the Hancock County Community Partnership and Community Coalition on Addiction which are long-standing coalitions focused on substance use prevention and mental health promotion. Zach manages the Board’s prevention interests, public relations, and leads work in cultural humility and health equity. In 2021, he was hired by the University of Findlay to serve as the Lead Strategist for the Center for Civic Engagement which serves as a backbone entity that provides support to seven other community-based coalitions in Hancock County. Precia Stuby is the Executive Director of the Hancock County Board of Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services (ADAMHS), a position she has held since 1997. Ms. Stuby holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree in social work from Ohio State University. Ms. Stuby is a Licensed Independent Social Worker, a graduate of the Hancock Leadership Program and the Mental Health Executive Leadership Program at Case Western Reserve University. She received the Leadership Award from Ohio NAMI, was named Public Health Champion of the Year by the Findlay City Health Department, is the Past Board President for the Ohio Association of County Behavior Health Authorities, has a published interview by William White on Recovery Management and is the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Northwest Ohio Chapter of the National Association of Social Work, the Athena Leadership Award and the Association of Leadership Programs Distinguished Leadership Award. Her current community Involvement includes serving on the governing Boards of the Center for Civic Engagement and Welcome to a New Life. She is also a member of the Opiate and Other Addictions Coalition, and the Findlay Rotary Club. Since 2013, Precia has been leading the ROSC Transformation for Hancock County. She completed ROSC Leadership Training Institute sponsored by the Great Lakes ATTC with Dr. Ijeoma Achara in 2002; participated in the ROSC Thought Leaders Summit in 2016; and completed a ROSC Training of Trainers in 2016. She has presented her work at the state and national level. Mee Lee Kim is a Research Scientist within the Institute for Behavioral Health at Brandeis University.  She has nineteen years of experience conducting research and evaluation using mixed methods. She applies a participatory action approach when working with community-based organizations and other community stakeholders. She is the Brandeis Principal Investigator of multiple federally funded projects to address or prevent substance misuse and improve mental health by building community capacity to address underlying risk factors while fostering protective factors. These projects include an expansion of a Systems of Care Model for Children/Youth with serious emotional disturbance, Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic to integrate health and behavioral health services, enhancements to peer recovery support services, and improving access to services for youth and families with traumatic stress. She serves as the Brandeis Principal Investigator of the School-based Telebehavioral Health Pilot Project in partnership with the Brookline Center for Community Mental Health and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. She also has ten years of experience working with state administrators to enhance Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMPs) as a public health and clinical decision-making tool. Ginny Williams is a dynamic leader and Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor based in Ohio, recognized for her expertise in driving transformative change within organizations. With a diverse background spanning various roles, Ginny brings a wealth of experience to her current position as Chief Culture & Transformation Officer for Family Resource Center, a $17 million community behavioral health organization. Ginny's journey in mental health began as a prevention specialist, evolving into direct service provision encompassing emergency services, individual and group counseling, with a clinical focus on grief and loss. Her commitment to professional development led her to obtain an Advanced Grief Recovery Specialist credential from the Grief Recovery Institute, further enhancing her ability to support individuals navigating challenging life transitions. Prior to her current role, Ginny held positions including Assistant Director of Counseling Services and adjunct faculty member in the Psychology Department at The University of Findlay. Her tenure as Director of Adult Clinical Services and Chief Clinical Officer for Family Resource Center underscored her adeptness in managing clinical operations and driving organizational growth. In her current capacity, Ginny is instrumental in reshaping organizational cultures and driving strategic initiatives aimed at enhancing employee engagement and organizational effectiveness. Her expertise in talent optimization as a Predictive Index Practioner, strategic planning, and collaborative relationship-building has been instrumental in introducing innovative services and programs to address community needs effectively. Her specialties include designing comprehensive leadership development programs, fostering a culture of growth and adaptability, and driving organizational performance through effective leadership and talent management strategies. Nichole Coleman is the County Veterans Service Officer/Executive Director Hancock County Veterans Service Office.  Under her leadership, the office has served more than eight times the number of veterans annually and increased the VA expenditures by more than $16.8 million for county veterans and their family members. Additionally, five innovative veteran resiliency programs were created to provide mental health support, additional recovery tools, and improved quality of life.         Register for the upcoming webinars in this series! Session 2: July 11, 2024 12:00 PM–2:00 PM CT/ 1:00 PM–3:00 PM ET Finding the workforce to address the needs of the community and build a locally defined ROSC is critical to its success. As a ROSC, new opportunities for an expanded workforce emerge. This webinar will tie this critical element of creating a workforce based on the actual community needs to a regionally assessed and defined system of care. The presenters will share ways of finding professional/peer workers for all segments and levels of the continuum of care, education-informed prevention-intervention-treatment-recovery, methods to locate community resources to develop and retain their ROSC workforce, and some of the lessons learned in the process of building an integrated and effective coalition.   Session 3: August 15, 2024 12:00 PM–2:00 PM CT/ 1:00 PM–3:00 PM ET Within a ROSC, process is as important as outcome. Sustaining a community/provider ROSC will depend on community ownership of the challenges they may face when maintaining a balanced approach to the relevant processes and outcomes. In this third and final webinar of the ROSC series, the presenters will review those ways to keep the community invested in its ROSC and the outcomes of a ROSC in Hancock County and elsewhere. They will also discuss specific recovery programs for high-risk populations (i.e. veterans, harm reduction, pregnant women/infants, overdose prevention, those in recovery, youth).  
Webinar/Virtual Training
The Mountain Plains ATTC is starting off Pride Month with a presentation to provide foundational knowledge to enhance your work with a diverse population. This webinar is designed to further develop understanding of LGBTQIA2S+ allyship and move toward solidarity. The session aims to help participants identify inclusive practices, skills, and resources to support LGBTQIA2S+ communities and demonstrating a commitment to the practice of allyship. Bio: Dr. Jeff Maliskey (he/him) is the Director for the Pride Center at the University of North Dakota. His work focuses on LGBTQIA2S+ identity support, gender and sexuality education, and advocacy. Dr. Maliskey brings over a decade of student affairs experience working with student affinity-based resources and support centers. As a first-generation, LGBTQ+ scholar, Dr. Jeff Maliskey understands the unique challenges that impact student success in relation to identity. His practice is student-centered, and justice based as means to work towards equity and inclusion in higher education.
Face-to-Face Training
In the demanding role of a faith leader, maintaining compassion while avoiding burnout is crucial. "Compassion Without Fatigue" offers practical strategies and insights to help faith leaders sustain their emotional and spiritual well-being. This training focuses on balancing empathetic care with self-care, ensuring that leaders can continue to serve their communities effectively without sacrificing their own health and happiness. By adopting these principles, faith leaders can foster a resilient and enduring practice of compassion. Balanced Empathy and Self-Care: Learn techniques to care for others deeply without neglecting your own emotional and spiritual needs. Sustainable Leadership Practices: Discover strategies to maintain long-term compassion and effectiveness in your ministry without succumbing to burnout. Resilient Compassion: Equip yourself with tools to foster enduring empathy, ensuring that your care for your community is both heartfelt and sustainable.
Face-to-Face Training
The effects of trauma and toxic stress can be noted in the family system when a member is actively using substances. The impact and stigma of substance use can create barriers for family members and providers to recognize and discuss life stressors including risky substance use. Eliciting unique and intimate details of these challenges from clients/patients is key to meeting behavioral health needs, and just as important when supporting family members at risk. This presentation will review co-occurring toxic stress and trauma in the context of family wellness and how providers can create a safe space to approach sensitive topics. The content will further inform on family engagement techniques that highlight person-centered, trauma-informed strategies using recovery-oriented language to build trust and rapport. Trainer: Diana Padilla, MCPC, CARC, CASAC-T
Webinar/Virtual Training
Difficult moments don’t have to grow into "incidents" that can threaten client engagement and retention. This workshop is designed to equip participants with basic concepts and preparatory actions that can be used to de-escalate a wide range of interactions. Trainer: Paul Warren, LMSW Credits: This training meets the requirements for three renewal hours (CASAC, CPP, CPS) and three initial hours (CPP, CPS) through New York State’s Office of Addiction Services and Supports (NYS OASAS). As an IC & RC member board, OASAS accredited courses are granted reciprocal approval by the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee. Many other states offer reciprocity - please check with your accrediting agency. Participants are required to attend the training in its entirety, turn on their video cameras, and actively participate to receive credit.
Face-to-Face Training
The New England ATTC in partnership with the Health Education & Training Institute is providing targeted technical assistance in Motivational Interviewing and the Power of Groups on 6/11/24 with nationally renowned motivational interviewing (MI) trainer Stephen Andrew. Using Motivational Interviewing in a therapeutic support group format is highly effective and provides several important steps that help break isolation. This training provides information on issues and treatment of special populations (adolescents, dual diagnosis, addiction, intimacy, low-income families, parents, etc.) through the use of support groups in treatment. In addition to the role of group leader, the roles of the participants will be discussed and compared in various types of group settings, as well as the importance of therapeutic contracts, goal setting, and group frequency duration, course, and process. [This is a private, targeted technical assistance (TA) event.  If you are interested in similar TA please contact [email protected]]
Face-to-Face Training
The New England ATTC in partnership with the Health Education & Training Institute is providing targeted technical assistance in Advancing Your Group Practice Using Motivational Interviewing on 6/11/24 with nationally renowned motivational interviewing (MI) trainer Stephen Andrew. Using Motivational Interviewing in a therapeutic support group format is highly effective and provides several important steps that help break isolation. Training objectives are 1) to define the different types of groups and to understand the effectiveness of groups; 2) to identify an effective  group work strategy for different group problems; 3) to learn a model of the process of change in group work and to anticipate potential pitfalls as a group leader; and 4) to understand the consumer's reactions to groups and the effects those reactions have on the group as a whole.  [This is a private, targeted technical assistance (TA) event.  If you are interested in similar TA please contact [email protected]]
Face-to-Face Training
The New England ATTC in partnership with the Health Education & Training Institute is providing targeted technical assistance in Advancing Your Group Practice Using Motivational Interviewing on 6/11/24 with nationally renowned motivational interviewing (MI) trainer Stephen Andrew. Using Motivational Interviewing in a therapeutic support group format is highly effective and provides several important steps that help break isolation. Training objectives are 1) to define the different types of groups and to understand the effectiveness of groups; 2) to identify an effective  group work strategy for different group problems; 3) to learn a model of the process of change in group work and to anticipate potential pitfalls as a group leader; and 4) to understand the consumer's reactions to groups and the effects those reactions have on the group as a whole.  [This is a private, targeted technical assistance (TA) event.  If you are interested in similar TA please contact [email protected]]
Webinar/Virtual Training
We have another offering taking place on June 25, 2024! This training is intended for any provider who is caring for or in contact with LGBT individuals, including mental health and substance use disorder clinicians, HIV healthcare providers, government employees, primary care providers, public health practitioners, prevention specialists, community-based organizations, educators, and school-based care providers and staff. The training includes an introduction to key terms and concepts (such as gender identity and sexual orientation), treatment considerations for clinical work, and addressing the specific needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Recall two (2) factors that might contribute to substance use among LGBT clients. Identify two (2) barriers for health screening and medical care for LGBT clients. Recognize two (2) health issues/behaviors for which LGBT clients have a higher risk. Identify two (2) strategies service providers can implement to create affirming environments for LGBT people. Specify one (1) treatment approach that has been shown effective with LGBT populations. Explain the concept of “cultural humility” and theorize one (1) way that it differs from “cultural competency.” Analyze two (2) strategies for creating culturally affirming interactions.     CERTIFICATES: Those who fully attend will be eligible to receive 3 NAADAC continuing education (CE) hours. NAADAC CE certificates will be sent to qualifying participants via email within 1-2 weeks after the conclusion of the training.     TRAINERS:   Tom Freese is the Director of Training, UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs; Director, Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center, HHS Region 9; Co-Director           Grant Hovik, MA is a Trainer and Online Curriculum Developer, UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and the Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center           The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Webinar/Virtual Training
This is a beginner friendly, data focused training that covers LGBTQ+ identity, outcomes, and increasing patient engagement in services. The training will give participants a broad understanding of LGBTQ+ culture, demographic terms, the data on population experiences, and tools that can be used in patient care and within an organization as a whole. The training will make individuals more comfortable and confident when interacting with and treating LGBTQ+ communities. Goals/objectives: • Identify the barriers LGBTQ+ Patients encounter when accessing health care services • Increase understanding of LGBTQ+ populations and cultural history especially as it relates to substance use • Cite existing tools and process improvement strategies related to providing services for LGBTQ+ patients BIO: Faye Seidler is an award winning advocate that specializes in suicide prevention, LGBTQ+ populations, and state data. She was born and raised in North Dakota and has a decade of experience in community organizing, public speaking, and professional development training. She is known for connecting and uplifting others, bringing communities together, and always keeping hope in focus.
Webinar/Virtual Training
The New England ATTC in partnership with the Massachusetts Bureau of Substance Addiction Services is providing intensive technical assistance in "Intermediate Motivational Interviewing" on 6/12/24 and 6/13/24 from 9:00 am to 12:15 pm with subject matter expert Robert Jope. Motivational Interviewing is a client-centered, evidence-based, goal-oriented method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence with the individual. This active, skill-building workshop provides participants with a review of the spirit and micro skills of MI, and focuses on using the strategies of the model to elicit change talk in conversation. Participants will integrate the spirit, skills, and strategies in practice conversations, and are encouraged to attend the Advanced MI workshop to develop proficiency in this method.  [This is a private, targeted technical assistance (TA) event.  If you are interested in similar TA please contact [email protected]]
Face-to-Face Training
According to research, 1 in 3 people see little need for preventive care and have low interest in health education. These dynamics are associated with poor patient/client and program outcomes. A key factor of patient/client outcomes refers to how engaged they are in their care. This interactive training will focus on core principles of Motivational Interviewing (MI) for person-centered engagement, aligning with culturally and linguistically appropriate, trauma-informed strategies. This introductory content explores all the basic elements of communication to enhance interactions and effectively engage individuals in their own wellness process. Trainer: Diana Padilla, MCPC, CARC, CASAC-T
Webinar/Virtual Training
Substance Use Disorder affects the LGBTQ community at a higher rate than the general population. Unique challenges like stigma, shame, and lack of support can impede access to treatment. As a service provider, it's important to create a welcoming and accepting environment, reduce stigma, and tailor treatments to the needs of LGBTQ individuals. Abstinence based recovery may be the key for some, where harm-reduction strategies may be more appropriate for others. By providing culturally competent treatment, we increase our clients’ chances of achieving lasting recovery. Objectives: Educate Substance Use Disorder (SUD) providers on the unique challenges faced by LGBTQ+ individuals with SUD Describe effective methods for treating and connecting with LGBTQ+ clients Learn to provide effective and culturally competent treatment to the LGBTQ+ population Presenter Information: Darla Belflower LCSW, CPS has worked in leadership in the substance use disorder and behavioral health fields for over three decades. She is currently the Clinical Director at Healing House. She has a passion for teaching others what she has learned in those years. She is Vice Chair of the KC Recovery Coalition, serves on the board of the MO Coalition of Recovery Support Providers and is a member of The MO Department of Mental Health State Advisory Council. Darla obtained her MSW from the KU, and she has a BS in Psychology and Alcohol and Drug Studies from MO Valley College. Darla is a person in recovery and author of the book, “I Am Not Anonymous.” This training has been approved for 1-hour by the Missouri Credentialing Board and the Iowa Board of Certification. Please email Bree at [email protected] for any questions.
Webinar/Virtual Training
The New England ATTC, in partnership with The Substance Use and Mental Health Leadership Council of Rhode Island is providing this targeted technical assistance on 6/14/24 from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm with subject matter expert Haner Hernandez. This training will introduce participants to how the social determinants of health have contributed to disparities and marginalization in the US and how institutionalized forms of racism, discrimination and disparities impact individuals, families and entire communities. The training will also describe strategies and techniques grounded in social justice that build healthy Social Determinants of Health, which in turn build and sustain equity. Register now!!
Face-to-Face Training
Nearly a third of all Americans have been affected by intimate partner violence (IPV) at some point in their lives. Health and behavioral health care professionals are well positioned to respond to cases of domestic violence or intimate partner violence. The trust within the provider and client/patient relationship offers opportunity to identify and support persons who may be victimized by IPV. This interactive training will review risk factors of IPV, screening tools for consideration, trauma informed interviewing techniques for eliciting information without re-traumatizing, and elements of a safety plan. Trainer: Diana Padilla, MCPC, CARC, CASAC-T  
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