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Multimedia
    This webinar focuses on increasing knowledge among providers in the assessment and treatment of wounds as related to intravenous drug and xylazine use.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Explain opioid use disorder as a chronic illness. Increase level of comfort in the treatment and assessment of wound care as it relates to intravenous drug and Xylazine use. Share best practices for incorporating harm reduction philosophies and principles in the treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD).     TRAINERS:   Nicole Gastala, MD   Dr. Gastala is board certified in Family Medicine and Addiction Medicine. She graduated from Loyola Stritch School of Medicine and completed her Family Medicine residency at the University of Iowa. In her clinical role, she has developed and expanded MAR by mentoring new prescribers, precepting residents, and training clinicians within the Chicago and Illinois communities.  She has also focused on the development of a walk-in integrated behavioral health, addiction, and primary care program within her FQHC system. In January 2021, Dr Gastala joined the team at the Substance Use Prevention and Recovery Division of IDHS as the medical director.     Michael Huyck, NP   Michael Huyck is a Family Nurse Practitioner at the UIH Mile Square Health Center and adjunct clinical assistant professor with the University of Illinois College of Nursing. His clinical role at Mile Square is focused on integrative substance use disorder treatment and primary care. His clinical interests involve decreasing barriers to addiction care, piloting evidenced based interventions to address problems specific to populations with SUD, and training future nurses to care for those experiencing addiction. He provides a full range of SUD treatment including buprenorphine and methadone within his practice. His current projects include wound care and ultrasound guided phlebotomy for people who inject drugs.     The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: November 29, 2023
Multimedia
    DESCRIPTION: As the illicit opioid supply includes more and more fentanyl, there have been increasing concerns about increasing rates of buprenorphine initiation precipitating opioid withdrawal. This session will describe why we believe this is happening, how common it is, and buprenorphine initiation strategies to support patients in avoiding precipitated withdrawal.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Describe the challenges of buprenorphine initiation in the fentanyl era. Name three potential approaches to buprenorphine initiation. Counsel on reducing fentanyl-related harms.     TRAINER: Elizabeth Salisbury-Afshar, MD, MPH is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Family Medicine and Community Health and Population Health Sciences at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison, Wisconsin. She is the Program Director of the Preventive Medicine Residency and core Faculty for the Addiction Medicine Fellowship. Dr. Salisbury-Afshar is board certified in family medicine, preventive medicine/public health and addiction medicine and her expertise lies at the intersection of these fields. Her work has focused on expanding access to evidence-based substance use disorder treatment and harm reduction services. Past public health roles include serving as Medical Director of Behavioral Health Systems Baltimore, Medical Director at Heartland Alliance Health (a healthcare for the homeless provider in Chicago), and Medical Director of Behavioral Health at the Chicago Department of Public Health. Dr. Salisbury-Afshar received her Medical Degree from Rush University Medical College and her Master’s in Public Health from John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.     The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: April 20, 2023
Multimedia
Throughout the month of September 2022, the Idaho Department of Health & Welfare in partnership with Recovery Idaho, Idaho Harm Reduction Project, and the Northwest ATTC hosted a series of online webinars titled “Recovery is Health, Health is Recovery." During the series, presenters discussed a range of topics relating to transmissible disease, treatment and precautionary measures, as well as harm reduction practices. Part 1: September 7, 2022 Presenters: Evan Burke (Idaho Harm Reduction Project) and Norma Jaeger (Recovery Idaho) In this session, Evan Burke offered a brief overview of the data on opioid overdose in Idaho and the response to it by government and community-based organizations. Burke also covered how to recognize and respond to an overdose and provide guidance about harm reduction informed practices. Norma Jaeger talked about the RxAware Program, which will address risks associated with opioids and pain management. Read more about this session and its presenters.  Watch the recording | Download slides | RxAware toolkit | RxAware flyer
Published: October 26, 2022
Website
The Naloxone is an Act of Love website was developed with support by the New England Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) in partnership with the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) on Opioids and Overdose. The website hosts a suite of resources designed to reduce stigma surrounding the use of naloxone and those who experience an opioid overdose along with encouraging viewers to get trained in and carry Naloxone. Specific resources include narrative videos, posters, and coasters. 
Published: September 1, 2022
Multimedia
In partnership with Brown University SciToons and the Department of Emergency Medicine, the New England ATTC created the product "Opioid Overdose Rescue: 5 Ways to Save the Life." This educational video teaches the viewer how to recognize an overdose and how to effectively intervene. Watch the video to learn more. 
Published: September 1, 2022
Print Media
This snapshot is intended to bring awareness to individuals, families, professionals, and providers about the serious substance use disorder problem among the Hispanic and Latino Veteran population. Español LOS VETERANOS Y LOS TRASTORNOS EN CONSUMO DE SUSTANCIAS Esta reseña infomativa tiene como objetivo proporcionar recursos a individuos, padres, profesionales y proveedores sobre el grave problema del trastorno por uso de sustancias en la población de Veteranos Hispanos y Latinos Português VETERANOS HISPÂNICOS E LATINOS E TRANSTORNOS POR USO DE SUBSTÂNCIAS (TUS) Esta síntese de informações destina-se a fornecer recursos para indivíduos, familiares, profissionais e provedores sobre o grave problema de transtorno por uso de substâncias entre a população hispânica e latina veterana.
Published: August 1, 2022
Multimedia
This webinar will review the pharmacological characteristics of stimulant medications and also medications that provide a stimulant effect and review which medications are most effective in enhancing natural recovery and improving fatigue and cognitive functioning in TBI survivors. A discussion regarding the similarity of ADHD symptoms to TBI symptoms will be presented. Frontal lobe and temporal lobe syndromes will be described, and specific medications will be reviewed that are likely to have a positive impact on the TBI survivor. Case studies will also be presented exemplifying the complexity of brain injury, cognitive impairment and effective use of medications.   Learning Objectives: Review the definitions, similarities and differences between Stimulant medications Describe the symptoms of TBI following or during rehabilitation Differentiate levels of TBI cognitive severity Understand the Psychopharmacology of Stimulant Medications Describe atypical stimulants, non-stimulants and antidepressants Understand the complexity of choosing a stimulant medication in a patient with TBI   Presenter Information Dr. Sparadeo began his career as the Director of the Mayor’s Task Force on Substance Abuse in the City of Providence, R.I. and he was also the Director of Substance Abuse Services for the Providence Mental Health Center at that same time. After creating a system of clinical services for the City of Providence he was appointed as CEO of Talbot House. Talbot House was the largest residential substance abuse treatment facility in New England. Dr. Sparadeo then completed his doctoral studies with a residency at the Boston V.A. Medical Center followed by a 2-year fellowship at Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital (RIH). The focus of his clinical training was neuropsychology and chronic pain. He completed his fellowship and was appointed to the Brown University School of Medicine faculty and the Rhode Island Hospital medical staff in the position of Director of Rehabilitation Psychology. Dr. Sparadeo trained numerous interns and fellows at Brown University. As Director of Rehabilitation Psychology, Dr. Sparadeo created the first comprehensive outpatient rehabilitation program for survivors of traumatic brain injury. After 8 years in his position at RIH Dr. Sparadeo was appointed National Director of Substance Abuse and TBI rehabilitation services at New Medico Health Systems in Boston, Massachusetts. He created inpatient substance abuse treatment programs in 8 rehabilitation facilities throughout the U.S. He returned to RIH and Brown University to become the director of the Concussion Care Center in the Emergency Department at RIH. He was also the chief clinical consultant to the Trauma Center and Stepdown Unit, and he was the co-director of the Interdisciplinary Spine Center in the Neurosurgery Department at RIH for 5 years before opening a private practice specializing in the neuropsychological assessment, pain assessment and pain management. He developed a specialized substance abuse treatment program for people with both TBI and substance abuse. Eventually, he developed a specialized treatment program for people with chronic pain and opiate addiction. Over the many years of his career Dr. Sparadeo has been a consultant to many agencies and healthcare programs throughout the U.S. He has also served on numerous boards of directors. He was the founder and president of the Brain Injury Association of Rhode Island. He was also the Chairman of the Governor’s Permanent Advisory Commission on TBI. He was also a member of the national committee on substance abuse and disability at SAMHSA in Washington, D.C. Most recently, Dr. Sparadeo has been a consultant and chief trainer on a federally funded grant at the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission. Dr. Sparadeo’s career has also included the publication of many scientific papers and book chapters, and he has been on the faculty of Salve Regina University graduate program in Rehabilitation Counseling where he teaches the Neuroscience of Substance Abuse and Mental Illness, Psychopharmacology for Counselors and the Neuroscience of Opioid Abuse.   Traumatic Injury & SUD: Implications of Stimulants on Traumatic Brain Injury
Published: September 9, 2021
Multimedia
These Telehealth MOUD Video Demonstrations show distinct clinical interactions common across the medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD) modality. Except for the first two videos listed (Buprenorphine Induction and Re-induction to Buprenorphine), which show the same mock patient at two stages along his treatment trajectory, the videos in this collection are independent depictions showcasing different settings, patient situations, and provider types. The common thread for these videos is that each patient portrayed has an opioid use disorder and is considering or engaged in medication treatment. This set of videos may be useful for individuals entering the MOUD workforce or for MOUD patients and family members curious about what happens at various points in treatment.  Produced by the Northwest ATTC (SAMHSA grant no. TI080201), in co-sponsorship with Southeast ATTC (SAMHSA grant no. TI080215) and the ATTC Network Coordinating Office (SAMHSA grant no. TI080205). We thank the clinicians involved for their conceptual contributions to the development of these characters and the clinical scenario.
Published: August 12, 2021
Multimedia
This month our National Hispanic and Latino ATTC and PTTC would like to support August’s Overdose Awareness Month and International Overdose Awareness Day, which takes place annually on August 31st.   Resources: https://salud-america.org/drug-overdose-deaths-during-covid-19-a-historical-spike-among-latinos/    www.overdoseday.com #NLBHA #NHLATTC #NHLPTTC Español  Nuestros Centros Nacionales Hispano y Latino ATTC y PTTC desean apoyar el Mes de Concientización de Sobredosis de el mes de agosto y el Día Internacional de Concientización de Sobredosis, que tiene lugar anualmente el 31 de agosto.   Recursos: https://salud-america.org/drug-overdose-deaths-during-covid-19-a-historical-spike-among-latinos/    www.overdoseday.com #NLBHA #NHLATTC #NHLPTTC Português Neste mês, nós gostaríamos de apoiar o Mês de Conscientização sobre a Overdose e o Dia Internacional de Conscientização sobre a Overdose, que ocorre anualmente em 31 de agosto.   Recursos: https://salud-america.org/drug-overdose-deaths-during-covid-19-a-historical-spike-among-latinos/    www.overdoseday.com #NLBHA #NHLATTC #NHLPTTC
Published: August 10, 2021
Multimedia
This is a recording of the 3.5-hour advanced medical interpreting course, designed for all language groups, provides an overview of terminology and skills in delivering mental health interpretation services. It focuses on common mental health disorders, treatment, medication management and practical skills in interpreting for either ambulatory or inpatient mental health patients. Click here to watch a recording of the presentation   Course Objectives: Review the professional guidelines and ethical framework of Healthcare Interpreters Identify challenges of interpreting in the mental health arena, both ambulatory and inpatient settings Describe stressors for refugees and immigrants that may lead to mental health disorders Identify common mental health disorders and appropriate terminology Discuss a refugee mental health model Differentiate your role as an interpreter in a mental health setting, versus a non-mental health setting Discuss best practices in mental health interpreting techniques Demonstrate interpreting   Presenter Bio: Gabriela Flores, MSM, has twenty-five years of experience working in the area of health and human services, specifically with refugee and immigrant populations in the Kansas City metropolitan area.  Her area of emphasis has been in language access, diversity and health equity.  Ms. Flores currently serves as the Director for the Office of Equity and Diversity at Children’s Mercy Kansas City.  Her role is to create and implement an organizational framework across the health system focusing on health equity, diversity and inclusion, which includes strategies specifically related to community engagement. Previously, Ms. Flores served as the Director of Interpreter Services for Truman Medical Centers (TMC), a Level I trauma center and safety net hospital for Kansas City, Missouri.  In addition, Ms. Flores has served as adjunct faculty at Johnson County Community College for the Healthcare Interpreting Program for Spanish Interpreters as well as in a similar adjunct capacity at the Metropolitan Community Colleges.  Ms. Flores holds a Bachelor’s degree in Anthropology, a Master’s in Business Management, and has completed the American Hospital Association’s Cultural Competency Leadership Fellowship (2006).  Ms. Flores is also a KC Chamber Centurion Alumni.  Currently, Ms. Flores serves on the board of directors for Girls on the Run KC, Gilda’s Club KC, Hope Wrx Food Pantry, and Latina Giving Circle of Greater Kansas City.
Published: March 24, 2021
Print Media
BHMEDS-R3 App The BHMEDS-R3 app is designed as a quick reference for non-prescriber behavioral health professionals and consumers who need general knowledge about medications prescribed for behavioral health conditions. The language has been modified to increase readability for a larger audience and, in keeping with the goal of continuously updating the app content, new medications are added after FDA approval. Download the FREE app using the QR codes below. Use the BHMEDS-R3 app for the following: Browse through different types of behavioral health medications Click a medication category icon to learn more details, including brand and generic names Use drop-down navigation menus to learn more about medications’ purpose, dose and frequency, side effects, emergency conditions, misuse potential, and cautions. Access provider tools and other free medication resources   BHMEDS-R3 Behavioral Health Medications Originally developed as a companion piece to the Mid-America ATTC curriculum, A Collaborative Response: Addressing the Needs of Consumers with Co-Occurring Substance Use and Mental Health Disorders (2000), this publication is now available as a downloadable PDF and replicates the content included in the new BHMEDS-R3 app now available in the Apple App Store and Google Play.  Back by popular demand, this 10th Edition publication is acclaimed for its accessibility as an educational reference for addiction professionals, patients, and families. Educators and addiction counselor training programs across the United States have asked that we continue to update and publish a downloadable publication to reflect the same credible and up-to-date information included in the BHMEDS-R3 app. We attempt to update the BHMEDS-R3 app content annually and publish an updated publication biannually.    Medications are organized in 11 sections: Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment Antianxiety Medications Antidepressant Medications Antimanic/Mood Stabilizer Medications Antipsychotics/Neuroleptics Hypnotics (Sleep Aids) Medications Induced Symptoms Treatment Narcotic and Opioid Medications Opioid Use Disorder Treatment Stimulant Medications Tobacco   Each section includes the following topics for the different medication types: Generic and Brand Name Medications: includes both approved FDA approved and “off label” medications.  Purpose: Describes typical uses of medications, including specific symptoms treated and positive treatment response expected.  Dose & Frequency: Discusses when and how medications are administered.  Side Effects: Discusses potential side effects, and methods for monitoring side effects.  Emergency Conditions: Includes risks associated with overdose, withdrawal or other medications’ reactions. Misuse Potential: Elaborates upon those medications with risk factors related to misuse and/or development of physical dependence.  Cautions: Describes general guidance on risks associated with taking medications    IMPORTANT NOTES ACROSS MEDICATION TYPES Name brand medications have a limited patent. When the patent expires, the medication may be made as a generic. The generic name of a medication is the actual name of the medication and never changes. A generic medication may be made by many different manufacturers and can make several forms of a single medication with only slight variations in color, size, or shape.  
Published: March 22, 2021
Multimedia
Happy December everyone! The holidays are here, and we wanted to share some words of encouragement to all of those who are striving for sober celebrations. #NHLATTC #NHLPTTC #Holidays #sobercelebrations #recoveryjourney #peersupport Disponible en Español ¡Feliz mes de diciembre a todos! Las fiestas están por comenzar, y queremos compartir algunas palabras de aliento a todos aquellos en recuperación que se esfuerzan por tener celebraciones libre de alcohol y drogas. #NHLATTC #NHLPTTC #Fiestas #celebracionessobrias #procesoderecuperación #apoyodecompañeros Disponible en Portugués Feliz dezembro à todos! As festas de final de ano estão chegando e gostaríamos de deixar algumas palavras de incentivo à todos aqueles em recuperação que estão se esforçando para ter celebrações sem álcool e drogas. #NHLATTC #NHLPTTC #Festas #sobercelebrations #recoveryjourney #peersupport
Published: December 11, 2020
Print Media
Click here to view the handouts for the ESAS series on Treatment Knowledge that took place on 8/5 and 9/16. 
Published: September 16, 2020
Print Media
This issue of Addressing Addiction in our Native American Communities focuses on the history of the opioid crisis. 
Published: February 21, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
The September 2019 Dialogue features: Addiction: National Recovery Month | Mental Health: Learning Collaboratives | Prevention: Prescription Opioid and Heroin Awareness | ORN: LGBT+ Long-term Recovery | Region 3 Spotlight: Recovery Stories of Shirley J. Davis and Kathy Dorman. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. If you would like to be added to our mailing list to receive the Dialogue and news and training announcements, sign up here.           Recovery Stories: In this month's newsletter, two special and brave guest contributors shared their recovery stories for Recovery Month.   Shirley J. Davis For many years, I ran from the realities of my past life and tried extremely hard to hide from the knowledge that I continually lost time and felt like “someone else,” until the winter of my thirtieth year. I went to bed one night and as soon as I turned off the light to go to sleep, I relived a horrible memory of rape. I immediately turned the lights back on and lay shivering in my bed waiting for daylight. It was then that I knew I had to get help. Continue reading Shirley's story.     Kathy Dorman I’m so grateful to be a recovering addict, to still be alive to give others hope, because I remember the life of hopelessness. My passion is to reach children and young adults who may feel hopeless or peer pressured into trying drugs. As a child, I was surrounded by family and friends who were caught in the disease of addiction. I tell people, yes, I may have had a choice, but literally I had no chance, at least that’s how I felt. Continue reading Kathy's story.
Published: September 3, 2019
Multimedia
The National CLAS Standards are intended to advance health equity, improve quality, and help eliminate health care disparities. This webinar will discuss how health care organizations need to ensure that awareness, adoption, and implementation of the National CLAS Standards are incorporated to have a more inclusive definition of culture in order to better serve individuals and families affected by the opioid crisis. OBJECTIVES: Highlight the enhanced CLAS Standards that contribute to positive health outcomes for all Americans Increase awareness of the Healthy People 2020 leading indicators and the Opioid Epidemic Understand the domestic and societal impacts of the Opioid Epidemic and the growing harm of opioid misuse Review a toolkit of critical steps to address this epidemic: the most effective way to treat those who are at-risk identifying high-risk members models of compassionate care the role and responsibilities of health providers   PRESENTERS: JACQUELINE COLEMAN MEd, MSM, BA, CPC Certified Professional Coach   DIANE MARIE JONES LICSW, LCSW-C Owner of Next Level Therapeutics Interventions, LLC
Published: August 14, 2019
Print Media
  Understanding addiction is essential to successfully addressing it. In this overview of substance use we discuss the spectrum of use, neurobiological responses to substances, signs and symptoms that explain the disorders, and the common definition of SUDs.  
Published: May 24, 2019
Print Media
Provides an overview of resources and initiatives to address opioid misuse in Michigan. Information effective May 2019. 
Published: May 23, 2019
eNewsletter or Blog
The April 2019 Dialogue features: Addiction: Alcohol and CAncer | Mental Health: Mental Health Problems Linked to How American Youth Spend Their Time | Prevention: Take Back Drug events for prevention | ORN: SUD Treatment Gap. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, Region 3 news, and Region 3 Spotlight: National American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Technology Transfer Center. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. We encourage you to provide any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. If you would like to be added to our mailing list to receive the Dialogue, news, and training announcements, sign up here.
Published: April 2, 2019
Print Media
Overview: Methamphetamine is the number 1 drug threat ranked by the Dallas, El Paso, and Houston DEA Field Divisions. Cocaine is ranked the number 2 and number 3 threat by the DEA Field Divisions. Pharmaceuticals, benzodiazepines, hydrocodone, and muscle relaxants remain problematic. Compared to other NDEWS sites, the number of fentanyl items seized and identified is increasing, but the number of cases involving heroin and fentanyl in combination is low, while the number of cases involving fentanyl and other opiates is high. The recent increase in the number of tramadol cases involved with other opiates is also a concern. Heroin in Texas is either black tar heroin or powdered brown heroin (diluted with diphenhydramine or other filler), with some white Mexican/South American heroin seen. Of the top 25 items seized and identified in Texas laboratories reporting to the National Forensic Laboratory Information System (NFLIS), heroin ranks #4, at 5.2% of all items identified, and fentanyl ranks #21 (0.21% of all items identified). Cannabis indicators remain steady, with problems most often seen in the trafficking of decriminalized cannabis products from Colorado through Texas. Synthetic cannabinoid and cathinone poison calls have decreased but recent research by the author looking at treatment admissions and poison center call data has found statistically significant trends over time. The user population has changed from younger males hoping to use a cannabinoid that would not show positive in drug tests to an older population who are more likely to be experiencing homelessness and co-morbid psychological problems.
Published: December 31, 2018
Multimedia
This webinar, held in November 2018, was sponsored by the Northwest ATTC and the Western States Node of the NIDA Clinical Trials Network. It reviews the biological basis of medications for opioid use disorder, reviews recent data on the effects of buprenorphine on patient outcomes, and introduces tools for integrating buprenorphine treatment into your current treatment setting. Presenter: P. Todd Korthuis, MD, MPH, Oregon Health & Science University, NIDA Clinical Trials Network Western States Node Download slides | Watch recording
Published: November 20, 2018
Multimedia
J. Paul Seale, MD, Certified by the American Boards of Family Medicine and Addiction Medicine, discusses America’s ongoing opioid epidemic. By the end of this one hour program, participants should be able to: 1) identify several key developments in the origin of the opioid epidemic, 2) describe strategic initiatives that are in progress to address the epidemic, and 3) identify specific steps forward that could help address the epidemic.
Published: November 1, 2018
Presentation Slides
This presentation by Professor Katherine Sorsdahl discusses the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) training model with applications in the South African context. Katherine Sorsdahl is a Professor and the Co-Director of the Alan J Flisher Centre for Public Mental Health at the University of Cape Town. She also serves as Expert Curriculum Development Advisor for the South Africa HIV ATTC.
Published: September 20, 2018
Presentation Slides
This presentation by Professor Bronwyn Myers discusses the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) training model in application to substance use disorders. Professor Bronwyn Myers is a Chief specialist scientist in the Alcohol Tobacco and Other Drug Use Research Unit at the South African Medical Research Council. Professor Myers also serves as an Expert Technical Assistance Advisor for the South Africa HIV ATTC.
Published: September 20, 2018
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The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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