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Multimedia, Other, Presentation Slides
This series consists of three webinars where attendees will learn from existing programs how a joint community/provider-led Recovery-Oriented System of Care (ROSC) can empower and positively impact America's growing mental health and substance use challenges.   Session 1: June 6, 2024 Session 1 of this 3-part series will begin by reviewing core definitions, learning key principles, and identifying the "planks" of success when establishing a ROSC as an "organizing construct" to all community health care and wellness services. Other central themes that will be shared are best practices for attaining and sustaining community involvement and lessons learned while building, maintaining, and evaluating the "community up" model of care. Examples of specific lived experiences will also be presented—in particular, the implementation of a recovery-focused care system in Hancock County, Ohio, as highlighted in SAMHSA's TIP 65.   Session 2: July 11, 2024 Finding the workforce to address the needs of the community and build a locally defined ROSC is critical to its success. As a ROSC, new opportunities for an expanded workforce emerge. This webinar will tie this critical element of creating a workforce based on the actual community needs to a regionally assessed and defined system of care. The presenters will share ways of finding professional/peer workers for all segments and levels of the continuum of care, education-informed prevention-intervention-treatment-recovery, methods to locate community resources to develop and retain their ROSC workforce, and some of the lessons learned in the process of building an integrated and effective coalition.   TRAINERS:   Dr. Flaherty is a clinical psychologist with more than 42 years of practice. In 1999 he founded the Institute for Research, Education and Training in the Addictions (IRETA) in Pittsburgh. Prior, he was the head of Institute for Psychiatry and Addiction at the St. Francis Health System in Pittsburgh. While at St. Francis, in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, he co-led these institutions in the creation of what is today Pennsylvania’s largest non-profit behavioral managed care company, Community Care Behavioral Health. He has authored over 26 Federal and Foundational grants and more than 50 published articles, chapters and monographs on topics related to substance use policy, prevention, treatment, and recovery. A pioneering and visionary leader in the science of recovery, he has spoken in 42 states on recovery focused care. A past adviser to the White House Office National Drug Control, he assisted in the development of early brief substance use screening and intervention (2003/Tap 33, SBIRT, 2013), the first White House Overdose Prevention Plan (2015), as co-leader and facilitator of W. Pennsylvania’s initial Overdose Strategy (2017), and in the design of Pennsylvania’s in its Overdose Plan (Commonwealth, 2018). Today he continues to focus on clinical practice, workforce challenges (Annapolis Coalition) and designing recovery focused models of behavioral health. His work is featured in SAMHSA’s recently published TIP 65, Counseling Approaches to Promote Recovery from Problematic Substance Use and Related Issues (2023). Dr. Flaherty is a retired Captain (Surface Warfare) in the U.S. Naval Reserve with 27 years’ service. He holds B.A. degrees in Philosophy and Psychology from the Pennsylvania State University; and a M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Duquesne University. He is especially proud of his 3 adult children and 5 grandsons. Zach Thomas is an Ohio Certified Prevention Specialist and the Director of Wellness and Education at the Hancock County Board of Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services. He is responsible for the coordination and management of the Hancock County Community Partnership and Community Coalition on Addiction which are long-standing coalitions focused on substance use prevention and mental health promotion. Zach manages the Board’s prevention interests, public relations, and leads work in cultural humility and health equity. In 2021, he was hired by the University of Findlay to serve as the Lead Strategist for the Center for Civic Engagement which serves as a backbone entity that provides support to seven other community-based coalitions in Hancock County. Precia Stuby is the Executive Director of the Hancock County Board of Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services (ADAMHS), a position she has held since 1997. Ms. Stuby holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree in social work from Ohio State University. Ms. Stuby is a Licensed Independent Social Worker, a graduate of the Hancock Leadership Program and the Mental Health Executive Leadership Program at Case Western Reserve University. She received the Leadership Award from Ohio NAMI, was named Public Health Champion of the Year by the Findlay City Health Department, is the Past Board President for the Ohio Association of County Behavior Health Authorities, has a published interview by William White on Recovery Management and is the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Northwest Ohio Chapter of the National Association of Social Work, the Athena Leadership Award and the Association of Leadership Programs Distinguished Leadership Award. Her current community Involvement includes serving on the governing Boards of the Center for Civic Engagement and Welcome to a New Life. She is also a member of the Opiate and Other Addictions Coalition, and the Findlay Rotary Club. Since 2013, Precia has been leading the ROSC Transformation for Hancock County. She completed ROSC Leadership Training Institute sponsored by the Great Lakes ATTC with Dr. Ijeoma Achara in 2002; participated in the ROSC Thought Leaders Summit in 2016; and completed a ROSC Training of Trainers in 2016. She has presented her work at the state and national level. Mee Lee Kim is a Research Scientist within the Institute for Behavioral Health at Brandeis University.  She has nineteen years of experience conducting research and evaluation using mixed methods. She applies a participatory action approach when working with community-based organizations and other community stakeholders. She is the Brandeis Principal Investigator of multiple federally funded projects to address or prevent substance misuse and improve mental health by building community capacity to address underlying risk factors while fostering protective factors. These projects include an expansion of a Systems of Care Model for Children/Youth with serious emotional disturbance, Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic to integrate health and behavioral health services, enhancements to peer recovery support services, and improving access to services for youth and families with traumatic stress. She serves as the Brandeis Principal Investigator of the School-based Telebehavioral Health Pilot Project in partnership with the Brookline Center for Community Mental Health and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. She also has ten years of experience working with state administrators to enhance Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMPs) as a public health and clinical decision-making tool. Ginny Williams is a dynamic leader and Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor based in Ohio, recognized for her expertise in driving transformative change within organizations. With a diverse background spanning various roles, Ginny brings a wealth of experience to her current position as Chief Culture & Transformation Officer for Family Resource Center, a $17 million community behavioral health organization. Ginny's journey in mental health began as a prevention specialist, evolving into direct service provision encompassing emergency services, individual and group counseling, with a clinical focus on grief and loss. Her commitment to professional development led her to obtain an Advanced Grief Recovery Specialist credential from the Grief Recovery Institute, further enhancing her ability to support individuals navigating challenging life transitions. Prior to her current role, Ginny held positions including Assistant Director of Counseling Services and adjunct faculty member in the Psychology Department at The University of Findlay. Her tenure as Director of Adult Clinical Services and Chief Clinical Officer for Family Resource Center underscored her adeptness in managing clinical operations and driving organizational growth. In her current capacity, Ginny is instrumental in reshaping organizational cultures and driving strategic initiatives aimed at enhancing employee engagement and organizational effectiveness. Her expertise in talent optimization as a Predictive Index Practioner, strategic planning, and collaborative relationship-building has been instrumental in introducing innovative services and programs to address community needs effectively. Her specialties include designing comprehensive leadership development programs, fostering a culture of growth and adaptability, and driving organizational performance through effective leadership and talent management strategies. Nichole Coleman is the County Veterans Service Officer/Executive Director Hancock County Veterans Service Office.  Under her leadership, the office has served more than eight times the number of veterans annually and increased the VA expenditures by more than $16.8 million for county veterans and their family members. Additionally, five innovative veteran resiliency programs were created to provide mental health support, additional recovery tools, and improved quality of life.         Register for the upcoming webinars in this series! Session 3: August 15, 2024 12:00 PM–2:00 PM CT/ 1:00 PM–3:00 PM ET Within a ROSC, process is as important as outcome. Sustaining a community/provider ROSC will depend on community ownership of the challenges they may face when maintaining a balanced approach to the relevant processes and outcomes. In this third and final webinar of the ROSC series, the presenters will review those ways to keep the community invested in its ROSC and the outcomes of a ROSC in Hancock County and elsewhere. They will also discuss specific recovery programs for high-risk populations (i.e. veterans, harm reduction, pregnant women/infants, overdose prevention, those in recovery, youth).
Published: June 7, 2024
Curriculum Package
Discover the Benefits of DBT for Individuals in Substance Use Disorder Recovery   Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) has emerged as a powerful evidence-based approach to addressing the complexities of substance use disorders, offering a comprehensive toolkit that extends beyond conventional methods. In this six-hour training, participants will delve into the core principles and techniques of DBT, exploring how they enrich SUD treatment by fostering mindfulness, enhancing interpersonal skills, regulating emotions, and bolstering distress tolerance. This training package includes a 6-hour PowerPoint presentation (full curriculum) and a 13-page handout packet. There are various options for presenting the 6 hours of content, including through a 1, 2, or 3-hour workshop, a single full-day (6-hour) training session, or two 3-hour sessions, which allows for convenient scheduling while maintaining satisfactory coverage of the material. All materials contained in this training package are 508 compliant.   Learning Objectives: At the end of this training, participants will be able to: Distinguish two (2) specific behaviors that DBT is designed to treat and the origins of DBT Describe the four (4) groups of skills utilized in DBT (Mindfulness, Interpersonal Effectiveness, Emotion Regulation, and Distress Tolerance) Identify two (2) ways in which DBT skills can be useful for substance use disorders Apply one (1) specific DBT Skill pertaining to one of the four (4) DBT skills Explain two (2) specific ways in which DBT can be integrated into an SUD treatment setting In-Depth Description of Training:  Originally developed to address chronic suicidal ideation and borderline personality disorder (BPD), DBT blends cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with a dialectical philosophy, emphasizing acceptance and change simultaneously. Over time, research has shown its effectiveness in treating a spectrum of mood disorders including depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), eating disorders, and importantly, substance use disorders. This training explores how DBT goes beyond its original purpose, becoming a pivotal intervention in reshaping behavioral patterns and becoming a crucial tool in reshaping behaviors, particularly concerning substance misuse. Through this structured curriculum, participants will gain insights into the four core skill sets (modules) of DBT: Mindfulness, Interpersonal Effectiveness, Emotion Regulation, and Distress Tolerance. Throughout this training, participants will examine the nuanced ways in which each skill set intertwines with SUD treatment, promoting a holistic approach toward recovery. Mindfulness, as the cornerstone of DBT, encourages individuals to embrace the present moment, detaching from harmful thought patterns and impulses. Interpersonal Effectiveness skills equip individuals with strategies for building healthy relationships, crucial in navigating support networks during recovery journeys. Emotion Regulation skills teach mechanisms for managing intense feelings, providing tools to modulate emotional responses without resorting to substance use, while distress tolerance skills empower individuals to withstand cravings and urge to use, fostering resilience in recovery. Moreover, this training underscores the importance of DBT in addressing co-occurring mental health disorders, breaking down barriers to recovery, and promoting sustained abstinence from substances. By fostering engagement, trust, and collaboration, DBT sets the stage for long-term success, enabling individuals to reclaim agency over their lives and forge a path toward lasting wellness. In summary, this six-hour training serves as a roadmap towards integrating DBT principles into SUD treatment, equipping participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to effect transformative change in the lives of those grappling with substance misuse.
Published: April 30, 2024
Multimedia
National Recovery Month (Recovery Month), which started in 1989, is a national observance held every September to promote and support new evidence-based treatment and recovery practices, the nation’s strong and proud recovery community, and the dedication of service providers and communities who make recovery in all its forms possible. Hosted by the ATTC, and MHTTC Network, in collaboration with SAMHSA, this hour-long event showcases the winners of the 2022 Recovery Innovation Challenge through a “talk-show” format. Hear from four of the ten Challenge Winners who share their innovative strategies for recovery, lessons learned from implementation, and recommendations for replication in other communities. Download the slides by clicking on the green "download" button above.
Published: September 29, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The September 2023 issue honors National Recovery Month, National Hispanic Heritage Month, Addiction Professionals Appreciation Day (September 20), and the 10th anniversary of the ATTC/NIATx Service Improvement Blog! As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!
Published: September 7, 2023
Print Media
****Available in English and Spanish**** This snapshot of information is intended to provide resources to individuals, parents, professionals, and providers regarding the peer recovery specialists' impact on behavioral health among Latinos in the United States.   ESPECIALISTAS EN RECUPERACIÓN ENTRE PARES PARA UNA SALUD MENTAL EQUITATIVA ENTRE HISPANOS Y LATINOS Esta reseña informativa tiene por objeto proporcionar recursos a individuos, padres, profesionales y proveedores sobre el impacto de los especialistas en recuperación entre pares en la salud mental de los Latinos en Estados Unidos.
Published: April 28, 2023
Multimedia
The Mountain Plains and Pacific Southwest ATTCs are pleased to offer a two-part recording focused on recovery support services as it relates to People With Stimulant Use Disorders (PWSUDs). In both recordings, a review of the current research is highlighted along with people with lived experience in stimulant use and recovery discussing the findings and relating it to their own experiences. The three panelists with lived experience, all currently work at well-established recovery community organizations (RCOs), one in Colorado- Advocates for Recovery and one in Utah- Utah Support Advocates for Recovery Awareness.  In Part 1 recovery support (e.g. definition of recovery, recovery capital, recovery benchmarks, etc.) and stimulant use (e.g., prevalence of use, impact on the brain, and craving) is discussed. While the Part 2 recording is focused on treatment and recovery services (e.g., treatment services, barriers to recovery, managing triggers and return to use, cessation triggers, 12 Step involvement, exercise, and involvement with RCOs). The overall goal of this two-part recording is to provide participants with a review of the latest science regarding stimulants within the context of people with lived experience highlighting the lessons learned from their recovery. Finally, promoting hope, community, and engagement as central/essential pieces to recovery from stimulant use disorders is a theme in both recordings with the panelists reinforcing that recovery is achievable for PWSUDs.   Recovery Support with Stimulant Use Disorders Part 1   Recovery Support with Stimulant Use Disorders Part 2        
Published: June 21, 2022
Print Media
The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on April 28, 2022 from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM. This discussion reviewed the article, “Diagnostic remission of substance use disorders: Racial differences and correlates of remission in a nationally representative sample.”  View the April 2022 RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: April 28, 2022
Print Media
The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on March 09, 2022 from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM. This discussion reviewed the article, “Hoots and harm reduction: a qualitative study identifying gaps in overdose prevention among women who smoke drugs.”  View the March 2022 RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: March 17, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the monthly e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.  The December 2021 issue features the Counselor's Corner blog post, a complete calendar of events, and resources for student mental health.   
Published: December 6, 2021
Print Media
The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on November 18, 2021 from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM. This discussion reviewed the article, “The science of recovery capital: Where do we go from here?”  View the November 2021 RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: November 18, 2021
Multimedia
This event took place virtually on Tuesday, October 5th, 2021 from 1:00 PM to 2:30 PM (ET). The New England ATTC hosted the inaugural SAMHSA Region 1 Diversity Inclusion Project Showcase (DIPS): Promoting Recovery-Oriented Organizations! This showcase was introduced by Assistant Regional Administrator Taylor Bryan Turner, with remarks by national and state leaders Tom Coderre, Deidre Calvert, and Nancy Navaretta. Moderators Dr. Haner Hernandez, Michele Stewart-Copes, and Daryl McGraw introduced four recovery-oriented community-based organizations that serve historically marginalized communities: Recovery Support Services; New Life II Ministries; Stairway to Recovery; and STEPRox Recovery Support Center. Learn more about the showcase here. __________________________________________________________________ The video recording of this session may be accessed by clicking on the "view resource" button above. Please click here to access the event agenda and here to access each community-based organization's presentation slides, which shared their organization’s mission statement, services, successes, challenges, and contact information. ___________________________________________________________________ For more information about the history of the DIPS initiative, please contact SAMHSA's Public Health Fellow Tim Jean at [email protected].
Published: October 7, 2021
Presentation Slides
  This event took place virtually on Tuesday, October 5th, 2021 from 1:00 PM to 2:30 PM (ET).    The New England ATTC hosted the inaugural SAMHSA Region 1 Diversity Inclusion Project Showcase (DIPS): Promoting Recovery-Oriented Organizations! This showcase was introduced by Assistant Regional Administrator Taylor Bryan Turner, with remarks by national and state leaders Tom Coderre, Deidre Calvert, and Nancy Navaretta. Moderators Dr. Haner Hernandez, Michele Stewart-Copes, and Daryl McGraw introduced four recovery-oriented community-based organizations that serve historically marginalized communities: Recovery Support Services; New Life II Ministries; Stairway to Recovery; and STEPRox Recovery Support Center. Learn more about the showcase here. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________   The event agenda and each community-based organization's presentation slides of this session may be accessed by clicking on the "view resource" button above. Please click here to access the showcase recording.   ________________________________________________________________________________________________________   For more information about the history of the DIPS initiative, please contact SAMHSA's Public Health Fellow Tim Jean at [email protected].    
Published: October 6, 2021
Print Media
The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on September 16, 2021 from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM. This discussion reviewed the article, “College programming for students in addiction recovery: A PRSIMA-guided scoping review.”  View the September 2021 RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: September 16, 2021
Multimedia
In September we celebrate National Recovery Month! The 2021 National Recovery Month theme is: Recovery is For Everyone: Every Person, Every Family, Every Community. To find out what is going on in your local area, to access resources and/or to get involved we recommend you visit: rm.facesandvoicesofrecovery.org #NLBHA #NHLATTC #NHLPTTC #RECOVERYMONTH2021 Español  ¡En septiembre celebramos El Mes Nacional de Recuperación! El tema del Mes Nacional de Recuperación 2021 es: La recuperación es para todos: cada persona, cada familia, cada comunidad. Para saber qué está pasando en su área local, para acceder a recursos y/o para involucrarse le recomendamos visitar: rm.facesandvoicesofrecovery.org #NLBHA #NHLATTC #NHLPTTC #RECOVERYMONTH2021   Português Em setembro celebramos o Mês da Recuperação Nacional! O tema do Mês Nacional da Recuperação de 2021 é: A recuperação é para todos: cada pessoa, cada família, cada comunidade Para descobrir o que está acontecendo em sua área local, para acessar recursos ou para se envolver de alguma maneira, recomendamos que você visite o site: rm.facesandvoicesofrecovery.org #NLBHA #NHLATTC #NHLPTTC #RECOVERYMONTH2021  
Published: September 9, 2021
Print Media
National Recovery Month (Recovery Month) increases awareness and understanding of mental health and substance use disorders and encourages individuals in need of treatment and recovery services to seek help. Recovery Month celebrates individuals living lives in recovery and recognizes the dedicated workers who provide the prevention, treatment, and recovery support services that help make recovery possible. Recovery is for everyone because it benefits everyone. In recovery, we build new connections to ourselves, our families, and our communities. The 2021 National Recovery Month theme, “Recovery is for Everyone: Every Person, Every Family, Every Community” reminds people in recovery and those who support them, that recovery belongs to all of us. We are all called to end gatekeeping and welcome everyone to recovery by lowering barriers to recovery support, creating inclusive spaces and programs, and broadening our understanding of what recovery means for people with different experiences. Resources: 2021 Recovery Month Toolkit - English 2021 Recovery Month Toolkit - Spanish/Español  
Published: September 7, 2021
Print Media
The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on July 15, 2021 from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM. This discussion reviewed the article, “New Addiction-Recovery Support Institutions: Mobilizing Support Beyond Professional Addiction Treatment and Recovery Mutual Aid.”  View the July RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: July 15, 2021
Print Media
The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on May 20, 2021 from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM. This discussion reviewed the article, “Relational recovery: beyond individualism in the recovery approach.”  View the May 2021 RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: April 22, 2021
eNewsletter or Blog
  Monthly e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. February 2021 issue features include Counselor's Corner article on the recovery legacies of Frederick Douglass and Malcom X, a state spotlight on Ohio, news about the new Peer Recovery Center of Excellence, and a calendar of upcoming trainings. 
Published: February 21, 2021
Multimedia
El objetivo de esta presentación es hablar acerca del estrés y el estigma que la comunidad Latina enfrenta en relación con la pandemia del COVID-19 y cómo esto ha provocado un aumento en el uso de sustancias ilícitas. Esta presentación tendrá información sobre el estrés Latinx, el uso ascendente de las sustancias ilícitas, y proveerá técnicas que pueden usar con sus clientes para ayudarlos a sobrellevar las dificultades.
Published: February 17, 2021
Multimedia
This webinar aims to provide an overview on the stress and stigma Hispanic and Latino communities face in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic and how this has caused an uptick in substance use among individuals. This presentation will provide recent research and information on Latinx stress, substance use and mental health trends, and coping strategies that professionals working with the Latinx community can use to help clients build resiliency. Additional Resources Presentation Handouts English Español Portuguese   Translations       Speakers Jessica Martinez, MA
Published: February 10, 2021
eNewsletter or Blog
Monthly electronic newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.  November 2020 features: Native American Heritage Month, launch of the new Peer Recovery Center of Excellence, and new products: Counselor's Corner, Stigma Basics, and Telehealth Survey Results-Mental Health.   
Published: November 11, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
Monthly electronic newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. October 2020 issue features project updates from each of our co-directors, a state spotlight on Illinois, and the results of our  National Recovery Month 2020 recovery word cloud project. 
Published: October 14, 2020
Multimedia
As work with clients/patients continues to evolve with insurers and the public, efforts have focused on increasing the emphasis on provider utilization of “best-practices” for the treatment of individuals with a substance use disorder as well as those who are dually diagnosed. While many best-practices continue to guide the work of behavioral health professionals and peer recovery support specialists, the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency (PHE) has significantly altered how treatment services are delivered with impacts on both the individuals served and the professionals collectively trying to achieve a new rhythm to their practice.   During this session, there will be an examination of (1) evolving best-practices that demonstrate recovery support services during the PHE; (2) how behavioral health professionals and peer recovery support specialists can develop best-practices for future PHEs; and, (3) next steps in addressing recovery supports during a pandemic.   Presenter: Timothy Legg Ph.D., Psy.D., M.S.N., M.P.A., M.Sc., M.A.C., P.M.H.N.P.-B.C. is board-certified as both a geriatric and psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner and is also a licensed psychologist. In his private practice, he cares for individuals who struggle with substance use disorder and dual diagnosis. He holds doctoral degrees in health sciences and clinical psychology and is certified as a Master Addictions Counselor. He is also a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of North Dakota.  
Published: September 30, 2020
Multimedia
During the month of September, we are excited to celebrate National Recovery Month, dedicated to those who are in recovery from mental illness and/or substance use disorders. This year’s Recovery Month theme, “Join the Voices for Recovery: Celebrating Connections”. We would like to honor everyone currently in recovery, thank all the allies who stand by those of us in recovery and encourage anyone considering recovery. Together, we can do it! Disponible en Español Durante el mes de septiembre celebramos el Mes Nacional de Recuperación. El tema del Mes de la Recuperación de este año es: "Únase a las voces para la recuperación: celebrando las conexiones". Nos gustaría honrar a todas las personas que se encuentran en recuperación, agradecer a todos los aliados que están a nuestro lado en la recuperación y animar a cualquier persona que esté considerando comenzar su recuperación. ¡Juntos, lo podemos lograr! Disponible en Portugués Durante o mês de setembro, estamos animados para celebrar o Mês Nacional da Recuperação. O tema do Mês de Recuperação deste ano, “Junte-se às Vozes para a Recuperação: Celebrando Conexões” Gostaríamos de homenagear todas as pessoas em recuperação, agradecer à todos os aliados que estão ao nosso lado na recuperação e encorajar todos que estão considerando começar sua recuperação. Juntos nós podemos!  
Published: September 30, 2020
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The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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