You are visiting us from Virginia. You are located in HHS Region 3. Your Center is Central East ATTC.

Products and Resources Catalog

Center
Product Type
Target Audience
Language
Keywords
Date Range
Curriculum Package
  SUD Keys to Education is a product for educators and clinical supervisors developed in 2022 by the Mountain Plains and Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (MPATTC and PSATTC). This product was developed to help community college/university faculty, as well as clinical supervisors and recovery support staff to have access to brief, science-based content with the goal of providing materials that can be easily infused into existing substance use disorder and related courses (e.g., social work, nursing, criminal justice, foundation of addiction courses, ethics, counseling courses, etc.) and for clinical and recovery staff use in in-service meetings. Individuals can select the specific content to infuse into existing curricula/materials depending on specific needs of their learners. Each slide in the slide decks contain notes to provide guidance on the topics along with references and handouts where appropriate. All of the stimulant-specific slide decks also have a video (MP4) of the content narrated by subject matter experts as an alternative way of presenting the materials. The main developers of the SUD Keys are: MPATTC, HHS Region 8: Cindy Juntenen, PhD, LP, Nancy Roget, MS, Trisha Dudkowski, BA, Kenneth Flanagan, PhD, Terra Hamblin, MA, Shannon McCarty, BS, Kim Miller, MS, Abby Roach-Moore, MSW, and Maridee Shogren, DNP PSATTC, HHS Region 9: Thomas E. Freese, PhD, and Beth Rutkowski, MPH.  
Published: July 27, 2022
Multimedia
  Alcohol is STILL a Drug: An Exploratory Webinar Series (February 1, 2022) Recording     The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.   DESCRIPTION  Alcohol is STILL a drug.  The opioid crisis, increase in stimulant misuse, and marijuana legalization dominate the news— yet alcohol remains the number one substance causing health, social, legal and financial problems throughout the US.  While this series will focus on the hopefulness of recovery from alcohol use disorder, we’ll also take a deep dive into what we know about the full impact of alcohol overuse and the ways it affects every person in the US.   February 2022 Session: LGBTQ+ Youth and Alcohol Use Despite gains in LGBTQ+ civil rights laws, queer youth continue to experience disparities in health, safety, and SUD issues. This virtual presentation will present what you need to know as a provider about queer youth and alcohol.     SERIES LEARNING OBJECTIVES These are the overall learning objectives for the full 10-session series:  Summarize the current impacts of problematic alcohol use in various/special populations, including pregnant women, youth, rural, and minority populations.  Assess and prioritize alcohol reduction efforts in targeted settings.  Describe the current efforts to curb problematic alcohol use, including best practices in providing treatment.    SPEAKER   De’An Roper, PhD, LCSW-S  pronouns she, her, hers    De’An Roper is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and is an Assistant Professor of Practice in the School of Social Work at University of Texas at Arlington. Prior to her academic career, Dr. Roper worked in various systems of care for more than two decades. Her early experience was shaped by working in the LGBTQ+ community during the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Later her direct practice included working in criminal justice environments developing treatment programs for people diagnosed with co-occurring disorders. Dr. Roper’s areas of practice expertise include program development, LGBTQ+ cultural competence, service team development and, she provides advanced clinical supervision. Her research interests include, sexual and gender minority health disparities, health risk behaviors, substance abuse, mental health and criminal justice systems.   
Published: February 3, 2022
Multimedia
Presenters: Tisha Wiley, PhD, Laura Kwako, PhD, Lori Ducharme, PhD ABSTRACT: This workshop will feature presentations and small group discussions with NIDA and NIAAA program staff, including strategic advice on how to start and maintain your NIH research career. Topics will include funding opportunities for dissertation research and pre/postdoc fellowships, career (K) awards, getting your first (and your next!) R01, building partnerships, avoiding stagnation, and making strategic use of supplements and other funding opportunities at NIH and beyond. The first 60 minutes will feature presentations and general Q&A. In the last 30 minutes, participants will be able to choose a virtual roundtable for small group discussions hosted by a NIDA/NIAAA program officer.
Published: March 25, 2021
Multimedia
Moderators: Haiden Huskamp, PhD and Maureen Stewart, PhD Presenters: Debra Furr-Holden, PhD, Lewei (Allison) Lin, MD, MS, Patience Moyo, PhD, Brendan Salonder, PhD, Stacy Sterling, DrPH, MSW, Lori Uscher-Pines, PhD ABSTRACT: This interactive workshop includes a panel of researchers from a variety of settings (e.g., academia, research/consulting firms) and career stages to give “nuts and bolts” guidance to new researchers interested in learning more about opportunities for research careers both in and beyond academia. Topics include setting priorities for the range of opportunities that arise across research, teaching and service; collaborating with other researchers; collaborating with community settings; writing manuscripts and grant reviews; identifying and evaluating grant opportunities.  Ample time will be available for questions and discussion.
Published: March 1, 2021
Multimedia
Presenters: Ali Jalali, PhD, Kathryn E. McCollister, PhD, Sean M. Murphy, PhD ABSTRACT:  This CHERISH (Center for Health Economics of Treatment Interventions for Substance Use Disorder, HCV, and HIV) sponsored seminar will provide an in-depth review of methods for conducting an economic evaluation alongside a clinical trial. Statistical methods frequently employed in applied health econometric studies (two-part, and generalized linear models, recycled predictions, mixed effects, longitudinal analysis, etc.), and best practices for data collection and analysis will be discussed, with examples using Stata statistical software; however, experience with Stata is not a prerequisite. This seminar is designed for investigators who have some familiarity with economic evaluations, but would benefit from a more detailed outline of the methods involved and examples of their application.
Published: February 8, 2021
Multimedia
Presenters: Megan Schuler, PhD, and Beth Ann Griffin, PhD ABSTRACT: Motivated by the context of opioid policy research, this workshop will provide an overview of key methodological challenges faced when evaluating the effectiveness of state-level policy using annual state- level data, as well as potential solutions and practice guidelines. We will begin discussing the commonly used linear difference-in-difference (DID) model and then subsequently discuss DID extensions and alternative approaches (i.e., autoregressive models, non-linear models, doubly robust methods, synthetic controls). Methods will be demonstrated in STATA using an opioid policy case study.
Published: December 16, 2020
Multimedia
Presenters: Rosalie Liccardo Pacula, PhD, and Rosanna Smart, PhD ABSTRACT: Numerous private and public agencies are collecting and reporting out information on state opioid policies to facilitate greater analysis and dissemination of state approaches for tackling the opioid epidemic. Most agencies focus on laws/statutes, which means that this is where the bulk of the research is happening. Definitions of many policies differ across some of the most commonly relied upon sources, which contributes to uncertainty regarding their impact. In this workshop, we will discuss some of the most common definitions being used for various policies, discuss how differences in assumptions regarding the meaning of “effective date” can have important implications regarding the likelihood of finding an impact through analysis, and discuss the importance of considering multiple policy domains.
Published: December 16, 2020
Presentation Slides
JMU Substance Use Disorder Education Virtual Conference An inter-professional training in SUDE/SBIRT for faculty and community partners. Holly Ireland, LCSW-C, Co-Director of the Central East ATTC presented the presentation at the conference: Implementing SBIRT: Substance Use Disorders Education. This was a closed event.
Published: October 16, 2020
Interactive Resource
This 1.5-hour, self-paced course is designed for treatment professionals considering career opportunities in primary care. The course provides resources and information to help professionals decide whether working in a primary care setting is right for them. This course was developed through a collaboration between the SAMHSA/HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions, the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) Network, and the Morehouse School of Medicine Center for Primary Care.
Published: March 12, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
The December 2019 Dialogue features: Addiction: Recovery During the Holiday Season | Mental Health: Supporting Student Mental Health | Prevention: Prevention During the Holiday Season | ORN: Family Peer Recovery Specialists | Region 3 Spotlight: Central East PTTC's A Prevention Guide to Improving Cultural Competency: A Literature Review. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox.
Published: December 3, 2019
Print Media
Created to accompany the MPATTC’s Guide to Using Text Messages to Improve Substance Use Treatment Outcomes Guide, this 11x17 Prompt and Reminder (PRP) Poster was developed as a reminder to use thoughtful text message language when communicating when using a text messaging system within your agency and to avoid “textese”.  This poster can be downloaded in two sizes, 11x17 (recommended for printing and display) or 8.5x11 (desk copy) directly from the MPATTC website by clicking the "download" button above.  The poster includes a QR code that can be scanned to access the Guide to Using Text Messages to Improve Substance Use Treatment Outcomes and the instructional demonstration videos. To maximize the impact of this product, the MPATTC recommends displaying the 11x17 poster in a location most visible and accessible to administrators/employees who schedule and use text as an extender to services.   To request 11x17 “The Language of Texting” prompt and reminder poster to be mailed directly to you, please click "REQUEST A HARD COPY". Instructions on how to print PDF files: https://www.wikihow.com/Print-PDF-Files   Research on the use of Prompt Poster: Recent research on implementation science highlights the importance of understanding the practical strategies that support uptake of new practices and adoption of evidence-based practices (EBP) by clinicians. For example, placing reminders or prompts in the practice setting where the clinician can easily see them provides timely cues that reinforce use of the EBPs. [see Cullen & Adams, 2012; Leathers, 2016; Sholomskas et al., 2005].     To Download: The Language of Texting Prompt/Reminder Poster was designed for display as 11x17 sized posters. However, we have also created 8.5x11 desk copies for in-house printing. These packages can be downloaded and printed by clicking  above and selecting either the 11x17 Language of Texting Prompt/Reminder Poster or 8.5x11 Language of Texting Prompt/Reminder Sheet.  
Published: November 4, 2019
Presentation Slides
This slide deck provides a brief overview of the importance of using language that helps decrease stigma associated with substance used disorders (SUDs). The slide deck is designed to be used by academic faculty in behavioral health programs, trainers, behavioral health providers, and state/county agency staff members for a variety of audiences. Each slide has notes for the presenter to provide guidance as necessary. References are included on each slide and in the notes. If you require further information on this topic, please contact the Mountain Plains Addiction Technology Transfer Center (MPATTC). You are free to use these slides and pictures but please give credit to the MPATTC when using them by keeping the branding and referencing the ATTC at the beginning of your presentation.
Published: October 9, 2019
eNewsletter or Blog
The December Dialogue features the opioid epidemic in HHS Region 3, and UMB Center for Addiction Research, Education and Service (UMB CARES).
Published: December 11, 2018
Presentation Slides
This presentation by Professor Katherine Sorsdahl discusses the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) training model with applications in the South African context. Katherine Sorsdahl is a Professor and the Co-Director of the Alan J Flisher Centre for Public Mental Health at the University of Cape Town. She also serves as Expert Curriculum Development Advisor for the South Africa HIV ATTC.
Published: September 20, 2018
Presentation Slides
This presentation by Professor Bronwyn Myers discusses the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) training model in application to substance use disorders. Professor Bronwyn Myers is a Chief specialist scientist in the Alcohol Tobacco and Other Drug Use Research Unit at the South African Medical Research Council. Professor Myers also serves as an Expert Technical Assistance Advisor for the South Africa HIV ATTC.
Published: September 20, 2018
eNewsletter or Blog
Monthly electronic newsletter
Published: September 5, 2018
Multimedia
This is the third webinar in a three-part series on workforce recruitment and retention in behavioral health, with a specific focus on the field of addictions. In this webinar, Dr. Christine Chasek, Director of the Behavioral Health Education Center of Nebraska, shares strategies for recruiting and retaining skilled behavioral health professionals to ruralareas. Dr. Michael Flaherty offers insight on recruiting and retaining peer support workers.
Published: July 25, 2018
eNewsletter or Blog
Monthly electronic newsletter featuring Great Lakes ATTC training events and other topics.
Published: May 1, 2018
Curriculum Package
This role play scenario can be used as part of an SBIRT training. It involves Tiffany, a 45 year old woman being seen for chronic ankle pain who scores in the severe zone on the DAST for prescription opioid misuse.
Published: March 20, 2018
Print Media
This is a one-page flyer detailing the objectives, mission and contact information of the South Africa HIV ATTC.
Published: January 17, 2018
Curriculum Package
2-hour, self-paced course provides a science-based introduction to substance use, substance use disorders (SUDs) and SUD treatment. Designed for undergraduate, graduate, and health professions students and practitioners who do not have a background in addictions.
Published: January 1, 2018
Print Media
This book comprises 20 essays in which family members described, in their own words, the most challenging part about having a family member with a substance use disorder, what it means to have a loved one find long-term recovery and explain why they are committed to recovery.
Published: January 13, 2011
Print Media
The BIRP Progress Notes Checklist can be used by counselors in developing individualized treatment plans. B=Behavior: client statements & counselor observations I=Intervention: methods used to address goals & objectives R=Response: the client's response to intervention P=Plan: what is next?
Published: June 1, 2007

The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

map-markermagnifiercrossmenuchevron-down