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Print Media
Mid-America ATTC partnered with Facente Consulting to launch a harm reduction consultation pilot program in early 2022.  The goal of this program was to act as a harm reduction resource to empower individuals and organizations seeking to implement or improve evidence-based practices within their systems to reduce stigma and promote the safety and well-being of people who use drugs. The poster outlines the findings of the pilot program.
Published: November 21, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The November 2023 issue honors National Native American Heritage Month, National Homelessness Awareness Month, and a brand-new Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy intensive technical assistance opportunity. As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list, so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter and thank you for reading!
Published: November 7, 2023
Multimedia
Please find the slides and the video for the Substance Use Disorder and the LGBTQ+ Community: Assessing the Impact of Compounded Stigma and Treatment Considerations on October 30 and November 6 from 1 pm - 2:30 (CST). Substance use is a complex issue that affects individuals from all walks of life, including the LGBTQ+ community. Members of this community face unique challenges when seeking help for addiction. Stigma, shame, and a lack of family support can all make it difficult for LGBTQ individuals to access the resources they need to overcome substance use disorders. Additionally, growing anti-LBGTQ legislation can further exacerbate these issues, creating a hostile environment for individuals struggling with addiction.   Session 1: Click here to watch the video Session 2: Click here to watch the video Click the button above to download the slides Objectives: Educate Substance Use Disorder (SUD)  providers on the unique challenges faced by LGBTQ+ individuals with SUD Increase awareness of the compounded stigma and discrimination the LGBTQ+ community may experience Learn to provide effective and culturally competent treatment to the LGBTQ+ population   Presenter Information: Darla Belflower has worked in substance use disorder and behavioral health for over three decades. She started a training and consultation business in 2022. She is a member of The Missouri Behavioral Health Council’s Culture, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (CEDI) Committee. She is also Vice Chair of the Kansas City Recovery Coalition and is active in the Kansas City Recovery Community. Being in long-term recovery from a substance use disorder inspired her to write her memoir, I Am Not Anonymous. She has also authored two booklets and is writing a workbook on Substance Use Disorder and Trauma that will be released in the spring of 2025. Ms. Belflower is a Clinically Licensed Social Worker in both Missouri and Kansas, a Licensed Addiction Counselor in Kansas, a Certified Reciprocal Advanced Alcohol and Drug Counselor in Missouri, a Certified Peer Specialist, a Certified Tobacco Treatment Specialist, a Certified Harm Reduction Specialist, and a trainer and educator of Narcan distribution. Darla and her wife live in Kansas City, Missouri, and enjoy spending time with their daughter. She is passionate about teaching and training so that others may learn how to help those most vulnerable individuals she has enjoyed working with. CEUs are pending. Please email Bree at [email protected] for any questions.
Published: November 2, 2023
Other
The New England ATTC, in partnership with RICARES, held the next monthly installment of the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction Reading Group series. We discussed a paper titled, “Mobile low-threshold buprenorphine integrated with infectious disease services” by Rosecrans and colleagues. A summary of the discussion is available for download.
Published: October 31, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The October 2023 issue honors National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, National Youth Substance Use Prevention Month, Hispanic Heritage Month, World Mental Health Day (October 10), and the newest installment of the NIATx in New Places blog series on the ATTC/NIATx Service Improvement Blog! As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!
Published: October 5, 2023
Multimedia
Each person who enters recovery is as unique as their story. And this month, in honor of recovery month, we are bringing you recovery stories from people in diverse populations. Hear what people in these communities want providers to know. Episode 5: Lisa got sober at fifteen, and now, at 34 people often discount her experience.  Lisa has many labels: a person in recovery, a queer lesbian, multi-religious, and a single mom who created her family through international adoption. She continues to work on her recovery daily and is grateful to be sober.    
Published: October 5, 2023
Multimedia
Each person who enters recovery is as unique as their story. And this month, in honor of recovery month, we are bringing you recovery stories from people in diverse populations. Hear what people in these communities want providers to know. Bonus Episode: Norma is an 88-year-old woman who entered recovery in her 50’s. As an older lady friends and family have a hard time believing she ever had a drinking problem. She educates her doctors and friends about what alcoholism is.    
Published: October 5, 2023
Multimedia
This FREE Virtual Learning Series is designed enhance education and training related to substance use disorders and to gain comprehensive knowledge and valuable insights into the world of addiction, focusing on four significant substances: alcohol, tobacco, opioids, and stimulants. This engaging and informative series has been designed to equip individuals, families, educators, and healthcare professionals with the tools they need to understand, prevent, and address substance abuse issues effectively. Whether you're seeking personal knowledge, professional development, or the tools to help someone in need, our Substance Abuse Virtual Learning Series offers a valuable opportunity to make informed choices and contribute to healthier, substance-free lives. Together, we can break the chains of addiction and create a brighter, healthier future for all. Join us in this transformative journey towards recovery and prevention. Module 1: Alcohol Use Disorder Screening and Treatment This module introduces Alcohol Use Disorder Screening and Treatment in the Latino population. Module 2: Tobacco Use Disorder Screening and Treatment This module introduces the Treatment of Tobacco Use Disorder in Latino Populations. Module 3: Opioid Use Disorder Screening and Treatment This module introduces the Screening and Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder in Latino Populations. Module 4: Stimulant Use Disorder Screening and Treatment This module introduces Screening and Treatment of Stimulant Use Disorder in Latino Populations.   Español Series de aprendizaje sobre el trastorno por consumo de sustancias Esta serie de aprendizaje virtual GRATIS está diseñada para mejorar la educación y la formación relacionadas con los trastornos por consumo de sustancias y para obtener conocimientos integrales y valiosos sobre el mundo de la adicción, centrándose en cuatro sustancias importantes: alcohol, tabaco, opioides y estimulantes. Esta serie atractiva e informativa ha sido diseñada para equipar a individuos, familias, educadores y profesionales de la salud con las herramientas que necesitan para entender, prevenir y abordar los problemas de abuso de sustancias de manera efectiva. Ya sea que esté buscando conocimiento personal, desarrollo profesional o las herramientas para ayudar a alguien necesitado, nuestra serie de aprendizaje virtual sobre abuso de sustancias ofrece una valiosa oportunidad para tomar decisiones informadas y contribuir a una vida más saludable y libre de sustancias. Juntos, podemos romper las cadenas de la adicción y crear un futuro más brillante y saludable para todos. Únase a nosotros en este viaje transformador hacia la recuperación y la prevención. Módulo 1: Detección y Tratamiento del Trastorno por Consumo de Alcohol . Este módulo presenta Detección y Tratamiento del Trastorno por consumo de Alcohol y Sustancias en la población Latina. Módulo 2: Detección y Tratamiento del Trastorno por el Uso del Tabaco Este módulo presenta el Tratamiento del Trastorno por Consumo de Tabaco en Poblaciones Latinas. Módulo 3: Detección y Tratamiento del Trastorno por el uso de opioides Este módulo presenta los Exámenes de detección y tratamiento del trastorno por consumo de opioides en poblaciones Latinas. Módulo 4: Detección y Tratamiento del Trastorno por el uso de Estimulantes Este módulo presenta Detección y tratamiento del trastorno por consumo de estimulantes en poblaciones Latinas.    
Published: September 29, 2023
Presentation Slides
This presentation titled, “Eliminating Disparities, Building Equity, and the Enhanced CLAS Standards: Current Context and Approaches” reviews current approaches to ensure adherence to CLAS standards and eradicate health disparities.
Published: September 22, 2023
Presentation Slides
This presentation titled, "Addiction Technology Transfer: Bridging the Gap Between Science and Service for 30 Years" provides participants with an overview of the New England ATTC and key accomplishments over the past three decades.
Published: September 22, 2023
Print Media
The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on September 21, 2023. This discussion reviewed the article, “Understanding Stigma Through the Lived Experiences of People With Opioid Use Disorder.” Article link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/37390780/ View the September 2023 RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: September 21, 2023
Multimedia
Each person who enters recovery is as unique as their story. And this month, in honor of recovery month, we are bringing you recovery stories from people in diverse populations. Hear what people in these communities want providers to know. Episode 4: Jazie is a non-binary person who is coming up on their 2nd sober anniversary. Jazie recognizes the older version of themselves taught them many things and acknowledges that they would not be the best version of themselves without that former self.    
Published: September 21, 2023
Multimedia
Each person who enters recovery is as unique as their story. And this month, in honor of recovery month, we are bringing you recovery stories from people in diverse populations. Hear what people in these communities want providers to know. Episode 3: Casey explains that recovery does not have to be abstinence only.  She discusses her thoughts on why she practices abstinence only now, but she may not always. She discusses why she may use substances in spiritual practices or rituals that her culture has used for centuries, and that does not contradict being in recovery. Casey uses her voice to stand up for who she stands on.     
Published: September 21, 2023
Print Media
  Treatment for Individuals who Use Stimulants TRUST A Protocol Using Empirically-Supported Behavioral Treatments for People with Stimulant Use Disorders     Purpose of the TRUST-MAIN Manual The authors of this manual have been involved in StimUD-related research, treatment, and training efforts for over 30 years. Over this period, the research on StimUD and its treatment has vastly increased and there is a great interest in better understanding StimUD and providing effective treatment for people who use cocaine and methamphetamine. We have produced this manual to promote the use of research-supported strategies for StimUD treatment. The manual attempts to combine a number of strategies into a framework that is appropriate for use by clinicians in settings where people with StimUD receive treatment. This manual is not intended to be a cookbook and the materials used and the framework for their use are not intended to be an inflexible, one-size-fits-all prescription. At the end of the manual, we list a variety of treatment materials (see Appendix) that can be added or substituted for the ones we are recommending. We provide the contents of this manual and the framework for combining these treatment materials as one example for how research-supported strategies can be combined into a structured treatment experience. The manual was developed at a time when CM with adequate incentives was considered impossible in the U.S. Hence, this manual was produced to offer a possible, albeit a non-evidence-based and certainly less effective alternative to CM. As evidence-based CM protocols using adequate incentives are increasingly being developed and implemented in the U.S., there is interest in having CM delivered within a framework of other evidence-based behavioral support. The use of the materials in the TRUST Manual to augment CM treatment is another possible use of the manual, either in the form of a 12-week framework, or as ad hoc behavioral support materials. The audience for the manual includes healthcare professionals who provide treatment services for individuals with StimUD. One category of these professionals who we particularly hope will benefit are therapists and other behavioral health clinicians who work in substance use disorder specialty care treatment programs. The manual has been written with this group in mind.   The manual intends to: Provide new information about the use and effects of cocaine and methamphetamine. Present several key clinical challenges that clinicians face when treating this population. Review the evidence-based treatment strategies for StimUD treatment. Discuss how motivational interviewing (MI) is central to the effective engagement of individuals in treatment and to assisting them with behavior change during treatment. Present how elements of community reinforcement approach (CRA) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be used to assist individuals with StimUD to reduce/discontinue their drug use and prevent relapse. Describe a procedure for incorporating positive incentives into the treatment milieu and/or support the use of CM for the treatment of StimUD. Provide information and guidance for how physical exercise can benefit individuals who are attempting to reduce/discontinue their use of methamphetamine and cocaine. Describe a plan for providing continuing care to assist individuals to sustain the progress they have made in a structured treatment program. List an array of manuals and training resources for other research-supported substance use disorder treatment approaches.   For those working with people receiving care for Opioid Use Disorder, an adapted version is available Treatment for Individuals who Use Stimulants while on MOUD TRUST—MOUD THERAPIST MANUAL & PATIENT WORKBOOK       Purpose of the TRUST-MOUD Manual The TRUST MOUD Manual is intended to be used with patients who are struggling with stimulant (cocaine/amphetamine) use while in treatment for OUD with methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone. Working with patients presenting in MOUD treatment is a challenging, yet incredibly rewarding experience. While it is rewarding, it can also be frustrating. Stimulant use among these patients is common and many patients don’t see their use as problematic. In fact, for some patients who use stimulants sporadically, they may not need treatment. But certainly, for some patients on MOUD, cocaine/meth use is extremely detrimental to the effectiveness of their MOUD treatment and is a serious health problem. However, in many cases, regardless of the severity of use, the patients often don’t recognize their stimulant use as a problem, and they are not interested in intensive treatment. The materials in the TRUST MOUD Manual attempt to provide this patient population with a useful set of information in a format that they find acceptable. The materials adopt CRA, CBT, and MI content and present it in a clear and relevant form that addresses the challenges they face while in MOUD treatment. We try to avoid long, didactic, lecturing materials, but rather try to create accessible topics and examples. TRUST was developed with flexibility in mind to optimize patient engagement and retention. TRUST materials can be presented in 1:1 sessions and can be scheduled with patients or in on-going stimulant treatment groups. Topics can be presented in a sequence and frequency that lets therapists select content to meet patient needs. The 24 TRUST worksheets can be used in a flexible manner to be relevant and useful to patients. Consistency is important when using the TRUST Manual. Set and adhere to meeting days and times. Start and end sessions on time. If used in a group format, have some group participation guidelines. Adhering to a specific session format and timing will enhance patients’ understanding of the group/individual session process and will allow them to focus on acquisition of new material. Patients using stimulants will undoubtedly experience cognitive impairment as they participate in sessions and utilize the TRUST materials. Slowing down to allow patients to gather their thoughts and express themselves during group or individual sessions is important. In addition, using multi-media and repetition can be helpful for patients to grasp new concepts. Use of Motivational Interviewing as a fundamental style and interpersonal approach is essential to success when using TRUST materials. Ideally, TRUST session attendance should be paired with medication visit attendance to reduce the travel burden on patients. This is especially true in rural areas, where public transportation is non-existent, or when a patient has employment, education, or homemaking responsibilities. When possible, patients should have an opportunity to determine therapy visit days and times based upon their scheduling needs. Research has shown that aerobic exercise improves cognitive capacity, reduces depression and anxiety, and improves cardiac and pulmonary function for individuals with stimulant use disorder. Several of the TRUST worksheets discuss the benefits of exercise as part of a treatment effort to reducing stimulant use. Encouraging patients to exercise will also help them to manage emotional highs and lows and help them structure their day. Getting patients to exercise is often difficult and requires ongoing encouragement and support. The TRUST materials and their use with patients on MOUD should be used with a strong harm reduction foundation. The #1 priority for this group of patients is retention in treatment with MOUD. Participation in treatment activities with TRUST materials, when appropriate, should be encouraged, rewarded, and praised. In our opinion, requiring treatment attendance with TRUST materials, with a threat of MOUD discontinuation is never justified. In an era of lethal drugs including fentanyl, retention on MOUD is essential. Other harm reduction activities should be combined with TRUST materials. Access to safe injection supplies, ready access to naloxone and fentanyl test strips, and as new drugs emerge (e.g., xylazine), it is critical to provide new information and test strips as they become available. Many patients in MOUD treatment have multiple life challenges, including use of numerous drugs and alcohol, food insecurity, being unhoused, unemployment, as well as both mental health and physical health issues. To be successful, patients will need to be retained in treatment for a significant period of time, if not for a lifetime. These issues are not going to be resolved overnight, but rather through consistent and prolonged effort. We hope these materials can be useful to your work with patients on MOUD.   Authors Richard Rawson, PhD Richard A. Rawson, PhD, is Professor Emeritus at the UCLA Department of Psychiatry and a Research Professor at the Vermont Center for Behavior and Health at the University of Vermont. He received a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of Vermont in 1974. Dr. Rawson conducted numerous clinical trials on pharmacological and psychosocial addiction treatment and extensive system evaluation activities in a number of states and countries. He has led addiction research and training projects for the United Nations, the World Health Organization, and the U.S. State Department, exporting science-based knowledge to many parts of the world. Dr. Rawson has published 3 books, 40 book chapters, and over 250 peer-reviewed articles and has, for almost 50 years, conducted workshops, paper presentations, and training sessions in many areas of the world.   Albert Hasson, MSW Albert L. Hasson received his MSW from UCLA and has worked in the field of addiction medicine as a researcher and a treatment provider since 1977. Mr. Hasson participated in the development of the evidence-based Matrix Model, a cognitive behavioral intervention for StimUD Treatment, and established the Matrix Institute on Addictions, Los Angeles opioid treatment program. Along with his administrative and clinical experience, Mr. Hasson has extensive experience in implementing and evaluating behavioral and pharmacologic interventions. He has served as a project director and trainer for the Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center at the UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs.   Janice Stimson, PsyD Janice Stimson, PsyD, has worked in the field of addiction treatment since 1998. For 20 years she has worked at the Matrix Institute on Addictions in the role of Clinic Director, overseeing and managing the clinic, seeing clients and supervising staff. At the clinic private adolescent and adult treatment programs coexisted along-side national research studies. Dr. Stimson held key positions in those studies and was responsible for ensuring the success of fulfilling recruitment, training, supervision, and protocol requirements.   Michael McCann, MA Michael McCann, M.A., is one of the founders of the Matrix Institute on Addictions and creators of the Matrix Model. He has overseen the operation of Matrix clinics as well as the integration of many research projects within these sites. He has over 40 years of experience in substance use disorder treatment and research, and has authored or co-authored over 40 articles, books, and manuals. He has trained and lectured extensively on evidence-based behavioral interventions, pharmacologic treatments, methamphetamine dependence, opioid dependence, and on the implementation of evidence-based treatments into clinical practice   Acknowledgements The authors would like to acknowledge the assistance provided by Thomas E. Freese, PhD, Beth Rutkowski, MPH, Gloria Miele, PhD, and Valerie P Antonini, MPH. Christine Morgan provided invaluable support with the production of the manual, along with editing support from Victoria T. Norith and Benjamin Nguyen, MSW, CPH. The materials in this manual include content and worksheets from the Matrix Model Therapist Manual (SAMHSA, 2006); from the Community Reinforcement Approach, plus Vouchers Manual (NIDA, 2020).
Published: September 11, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The September 2023 issue honors National Recovery Month, National Hispanic Heritage Month, Addiction Professionals Appreciation Day (September 20), and the 10th anniversary of the ATTC/NIATx Service Improvement Blog! As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!
Published: September 7, 2023
Multimedia
Each person who enters recovery is as unique as their story. And this month, in honor of recovery month, we are bringing you recovery stories from people in diverse populations. Hear what people in these communities want providers to know.   Episode 1: Laura celebrates her recovery and the person she has become as a result. When her daughter was battling her own addiction, this veteran, divorced, gay mom had to advocate to get her daughter's other mom to be recognized in the healthcare setting.  Laura and her ex-partner were the first parents in MO to have a same-sex partner adoption, but even that legal distinction did not stop the discrimination this queer family faced when seeking medical care for their daughter.      
Published: September 7, 2023
Multimedia
Each person who enters recovery is as unique as their story. And this month, in honor of recovery month, we are bringing you recovery stories from people in diverse populations. Hear what people in these communities want providers to know. Episode 2: Hector looked at his family and chose not to repeat those patterns.  Hector practiced abstinence into his young adulthood.  When he did start using, he practiced harm reduction.  As a queer, first-generation Hispanic immigrant, he has been able to put a voice to what so many in his culture could not do.    
Published: September 7, 2023
Presentation Slides
The New England ATTC Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Director, Dr. David Zelaya, presented the opening plenary session, “Incorporating an Intersectionality Framework to Understand the Impact of Racism and Heterosexism on the Health Disparities Encountered by LGBTQ+ People of Color” at the New England School of Best Practices. This interactive presentation offered an overview of tools to help behavioral health professionals understand how systems of oppression such as racism and heterosexism create unique health disparities (e.g., addiction and behavioral health care inequities) encountered by LGBTQ+ People of Color. • Explain two strategies to reduce these health disparities in the behavioral health setting.   Click the download button above to download the slides from this presentation.
Published: August 31, 2023
Multimedia
The risk of fatal overdose has changed significantly in recent years, most notably with the emergence of the illicit opioid fentanyl and the increasing prevalence of polypharmacy. In this webinar, presenters Michael Hite, MBA and Desislav Hite, MD discussed trends and patterns in overdose cases over the last 5 years, factors that can increase overdose risk including identifiable life events and mental health co-occurring conditions, and how different populations are affected across Region 10. They also discussed actionable interventions to enhance overdose safety including new medical devices and digital resources, harm reduction strategies, and collaboration with local community organizations. Download slides | View recording
Published: August 24, 2023
Print Media
The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on August 17, 2023. This discussion reviewed the article, “A Qualitative Analysis of Barriers to Opioid Agonist Treatment for Racial/Ethnic Minoritized Populations.” Article link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36403456/ View the August 2023 RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: August 17, 2023
Other
  What Providers Needs to Know About Inhalants   The tip sheet provides information on commons types of inhalants, signs of misuse, common slang terms, short-term health effects, a description of Sudden Sniffing Death Syndrome, and treatment options for address inhalant use.     For questions about this tip sheet, please contact Andrew Kurtz, MA, LMFT ([email protected]).  
Published: August 15, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The August 2023 issue honors International Overdose Awareness Day (August 31), opioid overdose prevention training on HealtheKnowledge, and the newest NIATx in New Places series blog post written by Lynn Madden, PhD, MPA.  And as always, you will find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!  
Published: August 3, 2023
Multimedia
DESCRIPTION Xylazine (or “tranq”) is a non-opioid sedative and tranquilizer only approved for use in veterinary medicine. However, over the past several years, human consumption of xylazine has begun rapidly increasing. Although initially only identified in illicit drug supplies in limited areas, xylazine has been found in 48 states as of April 2023. Xylazine is frequently, though not exclusively, used in conjunction with opioids, particularly fentanyl—due to xylazine’s ability to prolong their effects. Xylazine use presents many potential dangers to people, including an increased risk of overdose and the development of necrotizing tissue damage. This webinar will bring together experts from across disciplines to discuss the history of xylazine use, what is known about its current scope of use and consequences, the effects of xylazine on people, and wound care and other harm reduction strategies. It will also offer an opportunity for participants to ask questions in a roundtable panel discussion format. OBJECTIVES Describe Xylazine and its history of use and consequences. Explain how harm reduction strategies need to be adapted for complications in Xylazine use. Describe the current trends that detail the scope and the extent of the Xylazine issue. PRESENTERS Jason Bienert, RN, CWCN Josh Esrick, MPP   DRUG ENFORCEMENT AGENCY (DEA) GUEST:  Gail Poirier, Section Chief, Strategic Intelligence Section (NIT) Jaclyn Iera, Program Manager, Office of Forensic Sciences   SAMHSA Jeanne Tuono, Assistant Regional Director (Region 3)
Published: July 25, 2023
Print Media
The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on July 20, 2023. This discussion reviewed the article, “Meeting People Where They Are: Implementing Hospital-Based Substance Use Harm Reduction.” Article link: https://harmreductionjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12954-022-00594-9 View the July 2023 RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: July 20, 2023
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The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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