You are visiting us from Virginia. You are located in HHS Region 3. Your Center is Central East ATTC.

Products and Resources Catalog

Center
Product Type
Target Audience
Language
Keywords
Date Range
Multimedia
          Substance use, addiction, and overdose are significant issues facing our communities. As faith leaders, it is critical that we are aware of and engaged in being a part of the solution through actively caring for the people both inside and outside the walls of our houses of worship. This virtual presentation is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will focus on one faith community’s journey towards being a part of the solution and outline some practical steps they have taken to care for their community well in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina. Mental Health Specialists, Addiction Specialists, treatment providers, peer support communities, and faith community-based organizations in Region 4 are encouraged to register for free.     1. Identify stages of substance use in their local community and responses for each 2. List three ways their faith community could be involved in caring for those struggling with substance use disorder 3. Verbalize a way to differentiate those struggling with substance use in order to respond appropriately 4. Articulate the importance of how faith communities can effectively impact the community as a whole ..................................... Rev. Lance Rhoades  Dramatically touched by God as a teenager, Lance Rhoades has been a trailblazer in active ministry for over 20 years. He is currently the senior pastor at Tree of Life Open Bible Church in the Brookline section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He moved the church from Oakland to Brookline after renovating an iconic church building. This move leads him to oversee many community outreach projects, including a clothing closet, daily hot food programs, a preschool and recovery initiatives. He also serves as Open Bible East Allegheny District Director and now has partnered with key stakeholders in the South Pittsburgh region to lead the South Pittsburgh Opioid Action Coalition (SPOAC) to reduce opioid overdoses in this area.      
Published: July 30, 2021
Multimedia
    In a trauma-informed organization, the clinical and peer workforce ensures trauma-informed clinical best practices address the effects associated with trauma while honoring the core principles of trauma-informed care. It is an organization’s clinical work that gets to the core of shifting the focus from What is wrong with you to What happened to you. This virtual presentation is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will focus on the many facets of providing trauma-informed clinical best practices. Explore key components to trauma-informed clinical practice, the core competencies of a trauma-informed practitioner, and what it means to apply trauma-informed principles across all stages of treatment. Learn more about trauma-specific, evidence-based, and emerging best practices, including interventions, focused on the mind/body connection in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina.    1. Be aware of trauma-informed practitioner core competencies 2. Increase understanding of how to apply trauma-informed principles across all stages of treatment, from universal screening through treatment planning and discharge.   ............................................ Karen Johnson, principal at Trauma-Informed Lens Consulting, partners with organizations, systems and communities to promote individual and organizational resilience, using her knowledge and experience from 26 years working in behavioral health, community services and child welfare.  During her 5½ years on the National Council for Behavioral Health’s trauma-informed services team, Karen led the initiative with Kaiser Permanente, Trauma-Informed Primary Care:  Fostering Resilience and Recovery, to create a change package for advancing trauma-informed approaches within primary care.  Karen is certified in Dr. Brené Brown’s Dare to Lead and Daring Way and is trained in Dr. Bruce Perry’s Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics.  She also developed numerous community-based programs during her 19 years at SaintA in Milwaukee, WI.  Karen combines the newest science around adversity and resilience to infuse hope and connection into every client engagement, moving organizations and individuals forward in their healing journey.
Published: June 7, 2021
Multimedia
    This virtual presentation is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will focus on the innovative ways that Tennessee has approached partnering with the faith-based community to combat addiction and mental health issues. The approach is to help the faith-based community volunteers build recovery support services/ministry work by using a best practice model that directly connects them with state and local initiatives. The goal is to build more recovery-conducive communities utilizing natural/organic resources in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina. Mental Health Specialists, Addiction Specialists, treatment providers, peer support communities, and faith community-based organizations in Region 4 are encouraged to register for free.      Identify two practical steps that were taken in Tennessee to partner with faith communities related to substance use and mental health recovery Verbalize two different stakeholders in their community Articulate one step they can take to help draw upon organic community supports in supporting recovery   ......................................................   Monty Burks, CPRS, PLC, Ph.D., serves as the Director of Faith-Based Initiatives for the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, where his role is engaging and connecting Tennessee’s faith communities to the behavioral health care system, with the goal of expanding addiction and mental health support services across the state. He also oversees the Tennessee Lifeline Peer Project, a state program aimed at reducing the stigma associated with people who suffer from addiction, and the Tennessee Faith-Based Community Coordinators, who seek to help congregations build their capacity to combat addiction and mental health issues in their respective community. Dr. Burks earned his master’s degree in criminal justice from Middle Tennessee State University, his Doctorate in theology from Heritage, and wears the honorable badge of Certified Peer Recovery Specialist. Burks has more than 20 years of experience working with the criminal justice system in various roles, including adjunct criminal justice professor at Motlow State Community College, Criminal Justice Student Research Analyst at Middle Tennessee State University, and Criminal Justice Program coordinator at adjunct professor at Tennessee State University.
Published: May 14, 2021
Multimedia
        This virtual presentation is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will focus on Logo Therapy was developed by the renowned Psychiatrist and Holocaust survivor Victor Frankl. Logo Therapy is a form of psychotherapy that emphasizes meaning and purpose. In this presentation, you will learn strategies from Logo Therapy to help clients turn life pain into a life purpose in recovery in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina. Treatment providers, peer support communities, and community-based organizations in Region 4 are encouraged to register for free. Topics covered include: the 11 things that give life meaning; helping clients answer the question, Why did I survive my addiction?; helping clients turn adversity into a cause; helping clients create a vision in recovery which does not include the use of alcohol and other drugs; 10 Logo Therapy exercises; helping clients achieve life purpose in recovery.   · Define Logo Therapy · Articulate the 11 things which give life meaning. · Utilize 10 Logo Therapy exercises in your work with clients. · Help clients turn life pain into a life purpose in recovery.   ...................................... Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC has facilitated diversity training's for 25 years. His non-shaming, non-blaming style of diversity training has been well received by workshop participants. His strength as a diversity specialist lies in his versatility. He has helped a range of organizations with their diversity initiatives including: Fortune 100 and 500 companies; schools; nonprofit organizations; churches; hospitals and volunteer groups. Mark has delivered diversity training throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, Caribbean and British Islands. A partial list of Clients includes: 3M Corporation; American Family Insurance Company; Xerox Corporation, GM Corporation and the United States Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines. He is the author of 5 books and has had 2 stories published in the New York Times Bestselling Book Series Chicken Soup For The Soul. He lectures at the University of Chicago  
Published: April 21, 2021
Multimedia
S2 E5: Serving Marginalized Communities x Impacts of IPV In this episode, we focus our attention on substance use coercion including the common forms, the effects on survivors, and how providers address the needs equitably by integrating services. Our conversation suggests that integrated services uniquely benefit survivors and are associated with decreased substance use and experiences of violence. We highlight this topic as new resources have been released from the National Center on Domestic violence, Trauma, and Mental Health in late 2020. Resources: Substance Use Coercion as a Barrier to Safety, Recovery, and Economic Stability: Implications for Policy, Research, and Practice: Technical Expert Meeting Summary and Report Understanding Substance Use Coercion in the Context of Intimate Partner Violence: Implications for Policy and Practice: Summary of Findings Literature Review: Intimate Partner Violence, Substance Use Coercion, and the Need for Integrated Service Models       Gabriela Zapata-Alma, LCSW, CADC, Director of Policy and Practice on Domestic Violence and Substance Use, National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health | [email protected] Gabriela Zapata-Alma, LCSW, CADC, is the Director of Policy and Practice on Domestic Violence and Substance Use at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health, as well as a senior lecturer and coordinator of the addiction training program at the University of Chicago’s School of Social Service Administration. Gabriela brings over 15 years of experience supporting people impacted by structural and interpersonal violence. Currently, Gabriela's author's best practices provide trauma-informed policy consultation to advance racial equity, as well as capacity building related to serving marginalized communities impacted by violence, trauma, and other social determinants of health, nationally, and internationally.
Published: March 29, 2021
Multimedia
      This virtual presentation is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will focus on central nervous stimulants and their impact on the user's brain, body, and behavior in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina. Treatment providers, peer support communities, and community-based organizations in Region 4 are encouraged to register for free.     List at least three types of stimulants Describe the patterns and trends of stimulant use. Identify at least three impacts of stimulant use on people who use them. Summarize at least two specific treatment interventions that have proven effective in treating people with a stimulant use disorder.   .........................................   James E. Campbell, LPC, LAC, MAC, CACII has worked professionally in the human services field for over twenty-five years in a wide range of clinical settings, currently serving as the Training and Technical Assistance Manager for Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center.  His passion is helping individuals and families heal and build on the strengths they possess.  He’s a member of both NAADAC and ACA and is a past president of APSC/SCAADAC.  James is a nationally recognized, author and speaker.  
Published: March 26, 2021
Print Media
  The Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center (Southeast ATTC) is preparing an in-depth monograph on the power of spirituality in SUD recovery, scheduled for release in Summer, 2021. Meant for treatment, recovery, and faith audiences, the monograph will offer data on effectiveness, wisdom from history, and an abundance of suggestions for treatment, recovery, and faith leaders. Meanwhile, we are releasing two issue briefs, each offering a look at one facet of the monograph.   Written by: Pamela Woll, MA, CPS Document Design by: Celene Craig, MPH, MS Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center (January 2021)  
Published: March 22, 2021
Multimedia
          This virtual presentation is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will focus on emphasizing not only our mandate to "do no harm" in working with those who have previously been wounded but also will focus on ways to help re-establish a sense of empowerment to those who may have come to feel disempowered and who are at risk for negative life experiences in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina. Treatment providers, peer support communities, and community-based organizations in Region 4 are encouraged to register for free.   1. Utilize and interpret the results of the Adverse Childhood Experiences Questionnaire, 2. Articulate at least three adverse experiences covered in the Adverse Childhood Experiences Questionnaire, 3. Identify at least three negative outcomes correlated with experiencing adverse childhood experiences, 4. List at least three experiences that are correlated with greater resiliency in individuals, 5. Verbalize two practical steps they can take to help mitigate adverse childhood experiences and foster greater resiliency in those they serve. .................................... James E. Campbell, LPC, LAC, MAC, CACII has worked professionally in the human services field for over twenty-five years in a wide range of clinical settings, currently serving as the Training and Technical Assistance Manager for Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center.  His passion is helping individuals and families heal and build on the strengths they possess.  He’s a member of both NAADAC and ACA and is a past president of APSC/SCAADAC.  James is a nationally recognized, author and speaker.  
Published: March 20, 2021
Multimedia
        The history of formerly enslaved black people in the United States and their descendants have a unique place in the United States. While slavery is often thought of as a thing of the past, the institution was a far-reaching financial cornerstone and slaveholding states had an outsized influence on the nation’s formative years. The trauma of slavery, its social stratifications, and the rationalizations for its existence has been perpetuated by other social assaults such as Jim Crow, domestic terrorism through organizations such as the Klu Klux Klan, and discriminatory housing policies from the federal government. In understanding the entrenched, pervasive nature of these issues, it is imperative to draw upon the contributions of historians and sociologists.    The ongoing impact of these events contributes to present-day social determinants of mental health for African-Americans such as black disproportionate exposure to poor academic opportunities, families, and communities disrupted by mass incarceration, exposure to violent communities, and the stressors of incessant micro and macro-aggressions. Additionally, the rationale for the justification of slavery, the inferiority of blacks, is one that remains prevalent in American messaging, whether it be through the educational system, from politicians, or through media representations. In this presentation, a structural competency approach will be applied to explore the ongoing impacts of slavery and institutional racism, the ways in which these issues can impact patients and clinicians, and the medical and mental health professional's role and responsibility in not only being aware of but combatting these issues.      Objective 1: Understand the historical and present-day context of structural racism and its role in the social determinants of health Objective 2: Describe the implications of population mental health including assessment, diagnosis and treatment Objective 3: Identify actions that can be taken by public servants to identify and address the mental health ramifications of structural racism. ======================================       Sarah Y. Vinson, M.D., F.A.P.A. is a physician who specializes in adult, child & adolescent, and forensic psychiatry. She is the founder of the Lorio Psych Group, an Atlanta, GA-based mental health practice providing expert care and consultation. Dr. Vinson is also the founder of Lorio Forensics, which provides consultation in a wide variety of cases in criminal, civil, and family court cases. After graduating from medical school at the University of Florida with Research Honors and as an Inductee in the Chapman Humanism Honors Society, she completed her general psychiatry training at Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical School. While there, she also received specialized training in trauma through the Victims of Violence Program. She then returned to the South to complete fellowships in both child & adolescent and forensic psychiatry at Emory University School of Medicine. In addition to providing mental health care services such as psychotherapy, consultation, and psychopharmacology through her private practice, Dr. Vinson is an Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at Morehouse School of Medicine. Just two years after joining the faculty she was honored as Psychiatry and Faculty of the Year in 2015. She is also Adjunct Faculty at Emory University School of Medicine. She has been elected and/or appointed to national and statewide office by her professional peers. She is the Past President of the Georgia Council on Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and the Treasurer of the Georgia Psychiatric Physicians Association. Additionally, she is an Advisor for the Judges Psychiatry Leadership Initiative.  She has been a speaker at national conferences including the American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Annual Meeting, and The National Urban League Annual Meeting. Dr. Vinson has received numerous awards in recognition of her service and leadership including the University of Florida College of Medicine Outstanding Young Alumna Award and the APA Jeanne Spurlock Minority Fellowship Alumni Achievement Award.
Published: March 19, 2021
Presentation Slides
    This virtual dialogue was sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and focused on strategic but swift ways to support change through motivational interviewing Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina.    
Published: March 11, 2021
Multimedia
    This virtual presentation is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will focus on Contingency Management (CM) or Motivational Incentives is a strategy that has been proven effective as an adjunct in substance use disorder treatment. It is based on B.F Skinner’s “operant conditioning”. CM is designed to encourage positive behavior change in patients by providing positive reinforcement for behavior changes included in the patient’s treatment plan. CM has been proven effective in treating Methamphetamine Use Disorder (MUD) in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina. Treatment providers, peer support communities, and community-based organizations in Region 4 are encouraged to register for free.   Upon completion, participants will be able to: (1) differentiate between punishment and negative reinforcement (2) Articulate at least one type of contingency management strategy (3) Discuss three ways using contingency management improves treatment outcomes   ..................................................     Ed Johnson is currently the Associate Director, Training and Technical Assistance for the Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center (Southeast ATTC) located at the National Center for Primary Care, Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta. He has over 30 years of experience providing direct services to individuals with Substance Use Disorders (SUD) and Co-Occurring Disorders. For the past 36 years, Ed has been a person in long term recovery.  He is currently credentialed / licensed as a Licensed Professional Counsel (LPC), Licensed Addiction Counselor (LAC), Licensed Addiction Counselor Supervisor (LAC/S), Master Addiction Counselor (MAC), a Certified Clinical Supervisor (CCS) and Certified Peer Recovery Specialist .(CPRS).
Published: March 8, 2021
Multimedia
      This virtual presentation is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will focus on the reasons addiction is considered a disease, challenge some of the ideas about substance use disorders that are prevalent in many faith communities, and also honor some of the many wonderful, effective ways that faith communities can help individuals on their path towards recovery in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina. Treatment providers, peer support communities, and community-based organizations in Region 4 are encouraged to register for free.   1.    Verbalize the prevalence of substance use disorders in the general United States population,  2.    Identify four criteria of any disease, 3.    Articulate two reasons choice and will power alone are not an effective strategy for recovery, 4.    Describe two ways faith communities can help support recovery. ======================================     James E. Campbell, LPC, LAC, MAC, CACII has worked professionally in the human services field for over twenty-five years in a wide range of clinical settings, currently serving as the Training and Technical Assistance Manager for Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center.  His passion is helping individuals and families heal and build on the strengths they possess.  He’s a member of both NAADAC and ACA and is a past president of APSC/SCAADAC.  James is a nationally recognized, author and speaker. 
Published: February 24, 2021
Print Media
    The Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center (Southeast ATTC) is preparing an in-depth monograph on the power of spirituality in SUD recovery, scheduled for release in Spring, 2021. Meant for treatment, recovery, and faith audiences, the monograph will offer data on effectiveness, wisdom from history, and an abundance of suggestions for treatment, recovery, and faith leaders. Meanwhile, we are releasing two issue briefs, each offering a look at one facet of the monograph.   Written by: Pamela Woll, MA, CPS Document Design by: Celene Craig, MPH, MS Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center (October 2020)
Published: January 27, 2021
Multimedia
    S2 E4 | Addiction Equity X Policy Progression In this episode, we focus our attention on recognizing the 10th anniversary of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA) and the Kennedy-Satcher Center for Mental Health Equity in the Satcher Health Leadership Institute at Morehouse School of Medicine. The collaboration jointly released “Evaluating State Mental Health and Addiction Parity Statutes,” with 32 states receiving a failing grade for statues designed to ensure equal access to mental health and addiction treatment. We spoke to Megan on the next steps, broke down some jargon, and defined the basics of Addiction Equity. We promote and raise awareness on how to be involved in the addiction community to garner policy change in the Southeast.  Resources:  Evaluating State Mental Health and Addiction Parity Statutes: A Technical Report The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act YelloPain - My Vote Don't Count (A civics lesson via hip hop song)       Megan Douglas, JD is the Director of Health Policy for the National Center for Primary Care (NCPC) and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Community Health and Preventive Medicine at Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) in Atlanta, GA. Megan is a licensed attorney whose research focuses on studying how laws and policies can be used to improve health and eliminate health disparities. She has expertise in health information technology, Medicaid, primary care, behavioral health, and health equity. Megan is also the course director for the Health Policy and Advocacy rotation, offered to MSM medical students and residents, which teaches them about the policymaking process and ways to leverage clinical experience to inform policy.  Megan received her law degree from Georgia State University (GSU) College of Law, where she interned with the Supreme Court of Georgia, the Georgia Hospital Association, and the Health Law Partnership (HeLP), a medical-legal partnership assisting low-income patients of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta with legal needs that impacted their health. After graduation, Megan became a joint fellow with the Satcher Health Leadership Institute’s Health Policy Leadership Fellowship program at MSM and the Georgia Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disorders (LEND) program at GSU. Megan serves on the Advisory Council for HeLP and the Community Advisory Council for the Center for Leadership in Disability at GSU.    
Published: January 26, 2021
Multimedia
      This skill-building virtual presentation is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will focus on strategies to create an inclusive organization in substance use disorders and mental health treatment settings. Topics covered include the definitions of diversity, cultural competence, and cultural humility; reasons cultural humility is a more realistic goal than cultural competence; how to create a welcoming environment for clients seeking substance use disorders treatment from a diversity of cultural backgrounds; how to have a discussion of differences; how to help your co-workers feel appreciated regardless of differences; microaggressions, micro-insults, and micro-invalidations in the workplace; a 6 step strategy to repair damage if you insult a co-worker; how to be a diversity change agent in the workplace; how to create an inclusive substance use disorders and mental health program in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina. Treatment providers, peer support communities, and community-based organizations in Region 4 are encouraged to register for free.   Repair damage if you inadvertently commit a microaggression or insult in the workplace Help co-workers feel appreciated regardless of differences Be a diversity change agent in substance use disorders and mental health settings. Create an inclusive substance use disorders and mental health organization ..................................................................     Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, is an international speaker, trainer, and consultant in the behavioral health field whose work has reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, the Caribbean, and the British Islands. Mark has been a certified addictions counselor for 34 years. Mark is co-founder of the Serenity Academy of Chicago, the only recovery high school in Illinois. He is past president of the board of the Illinois Chapter of NAADAC.   
Published: December 15, 2020
Multimedia
        S2 Ep3: Parenting Through Your Recovery Journey In this episode, we have the pleasure of speaking with Technology Transfer Specialist and President and CEO of Inentional Begginnings, LLC, Sharon Hesseltine. We turn our attention to the stigma and barriers that women face while parenting or pregnant while being challenged with substance use disorder (SUD). Sharon highlights her personal journey as a mother while plowing through her road to recovery. She also debunks some common myths of being pregnant with a SUD.  Listeners will get an overview of her newest project, "Providing Peer-Based Recovery Support Services for Pregnant and Parenting Families".        Sharon Hesseltine, BSW is the President and CEO of Intentional Beginnings Consulting & Training, a small non-profit with the mission of strengthening organizations and individuals serving those who experience substance use disorders, adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), and trauma. Sharon received her Bachelor of Science in Social Work from Southern Illinois University in 1981, and in 2011 completed a two-year post-graduate Certificate in Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health from the University of Minnesota. For over 30 years Sharon has worked in Public Health and specialized in early childhood development, women’s health, and addiction. Her career has ranged from providing direct services to women through managing two sober living residences to designing and facilitating statewide and local collaborative initiatives that call on her skills in public policy, strategic planning, cross-sector collaboration, program assessment, and marketing. She is a national trainer, Technology Transfer Specialist, and facilitator for multiple organizations including the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation, the Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (ATTC), and the Opioid Response Network. In 2018, Sharon took the lead in developing SUD specific training for Peer Support Specialists and Supervisors for the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Sharon is passionate about reducing the stigma associated with addiction and developing the capacity of communities, organizations, and individuals to better meet the needs of individuals with substance use disorders. With her husband, Scott Hesseltine, she currently resides in Louisville, KY.   Sponsorships: off for this episode                        
Published: December 9, 2020
Multimedia
          This virtual dialogue is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will focus on how partnerships between primary care and behavioral health and comprehensive strategy can lead to health equity in underserved communities that are experiencing SUDs in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina.     Dominic Mack is a Professor of Family Medicine at Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) and serves as Director of the National Center for Primary Care (NCPC). Dr. Mack provides oversight of NCPC’s portfolio of big data health equity, health services, and HIT research. He leads the promotion of health equity through research, training, and application of innovative technology solutions that advance primary care systems to improve population health. He is founding director of the Georgia Health Information Technology Center (GA-HITEC) and Georgia Health Connect (GaHC) health information exchange and also directs Health Policy within the NIH Transdisciplinary Collaborative Center at MSM. Dr. Mack spent over 20 years practicing medicine and providing medical leadership in metropolitan Atlanta with many years of service in the Federally Qualified Health Center system. He works to develop national partnerships in rural and urban communities and takes a team-based approach to implement and sustaining community-based interventions for better outcomes. Current programs focus on progressing collaborative partnerships across communities to impact Diabetes and Substance Abuse outcomes. He is the founder and past president of Mack Medical Consultants, a for-profit company dedicated to the improvement of business practices in medical organizations.
Published: December 3, 2020
Multimedia
          Season 2 Episode 2: Crossing the Prevention Bridge to Treatment and Recovery: The SUD Equity Journey This episode is a product of the Southeast TTC Critical Thought Leaders Collaboration. This podcast episode is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will feature, Nicole Augustine, MPH, MCHES, CSAPC, who has been working in the field of prevention since 2001. She has a Master of Public Health degree from The George Washington University School of Public Health. We focus on health equity/health disparities from the lens of innovation and how to connect substance use prevention to treatment/recovery efforts. We speak with Nicole Augustine on how the environment can pose barriers and challenges for organizations to properly serve in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina. Furthermore, we have a chance to discuss a national discussion (Addiction and Prevention Technology Transfer Center collaboration) surrounding emerging issues around COVID-19 and social determinants of health (SDH) for the substance use prevention, treatment, and recovery workforce. The initial listening session framed the ongoing and emerging issues and subsequent strategic discussions to engage key communities, the intent was to gather strategies and resources to identify emerging best practices that can support underserved and/or communities of color. Nicole also introduces her position and future projects of purpose.        Nicole Augustine, MPH, MCHES, CSAPC has been working in the field of prevention since 2001.  She has a Master of Public Health degree from The George Washington University School of Public Health.  As a prevention consultant, she has several years of experience facilitating prevention education curriculums and providing technical assistance to coalitions in the development of environmental strategies.   Nicole is a passionate prevention provider, committed to supporting initiatives designed to address the complex substance use issues affecting our society.  Additionally, Nicole is committed to seeing an increase in the number of credential prevention professionals, as a means of ensuring the delivery of evidence-informed practices.
Published: November 19, 2020
Presentation Slides
    Many people can trace patterns of addiction, trauma, dark secrets, and drug-related fatalities in their family for four or five generations. This virtual presentation is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will focus on prevention, intervention, and treatment strategies to help break intergenerational patterns of addictions, trauma, and dark secrets in families. We will discuss the role of prevention specialists, therapists, providers. Trauma specialists, persons in recovery, families, and entire communities in breaking these patterns. Other topics include: how to create a healing forest to help break intergenerational patterns; the entire community as the prevention and recovery center; the unique risk and protective factors for children of parents with substance use disorders and prevention strategies; fetal alcohol spectrum as a risk factor and intervention strategies; the impact of siblings on the intergenerational transmission of addiction and prevention strategies in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina. Treatment providers, peer support communities, and community-based organizations in Region 4 are encouraged to register for free. Questions about Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center Network (Southeast ATTC) or this training? Contact Michelle Harrison ([email protected]).      Six risk factors for intergenerational patterns of addiction in families. The role of prevention specialists, therapists, trauma specialists, and behavioral health specialists in breaking intergenerational patterns of addiction, trauma, and dark secrets. The roles of persons in recovery and families in breaking intergenerational patterns. The unique risks for children of substance-using parents. The impact of siblings on the intergenerational transmission of addiction and prevention strategies. How to create a healing forest to help break intergenerational patterns.   ====================================     Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, is an international speaker, trainer, and consultant in the behavioral health field whose work has reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, Caribbean and British Islands. Mark has been a certified addictions counselor for 34 years. Mark is co-founder of Serenity Academy of Chicago, the only recovery high school in Illinois. He is past president of the board of the Illinois Chapter of NAADAC. He has had a 30-year career as a university educator having taught at the University of Chicago, Illinois State University, Illinois School of Professional Psychology, and Loyola University of Chicago, School of Social Work.         
Published: November 12, 2020
Multimedia
    This virtual presentation is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will focus on a strength-based approach to engaging African Americans in substance use disorders treatment; rapport building with African American Clients within the first 10 minutes of contact; reasons African Americans resist substance use disorders treatment and intervention strategies; effective cross-cultural counseling skills with African Americans with substance use disorders; traditional and non-traditional approaches to recovery among African Americans; How to mobilize the entire African American Community to support recovery in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina. Treatment providers, peer support communities, and community-based organizations in Region 4 are encouraged to register for free.     BY THE END OF THIS PRESENTATION YOU WILL BE ABLE TO: Utilize 10 strength-based questions to help engage African American Clients into substance use disorders treatment. Build rapport with African American Clients. Engage African American Clients in the cross-cultural counseling relationship. Engage African Americans into substance use disorders treatment within the first 10 minutes of contact. Articulate non-traditional approaches to substance use disorders treatment with African American clients. Mobilize the entire African American community to support recovery. ..................................................................     Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, is an international speaker, trainer, and consultant in the behavioral health field whose work has reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, the Caribbean, and the British Islands. Mark has been a certified addictions counselor for 34 years. Mark is co-founder of the Serenity Academy of Chicago, the only recovery high school in Illinois. He is past president of the board of the Illinois Chapter of NAADAC. 
Published: October 26, 2020
Multimedia
    LISTEN NOW   Season 2 Episode 1: The New Normal: Ethnic Sensitivities and SUDs   This podcast episode is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will feature, Joy Ssebikindu, LPC graduate from Vanderbilt University (BA, Sociology and Child Development) and MEd in Clinical Mental Health counseling. We focus on health disparities in the southeast, the African American substance use disorder (SUD) treatment and recovery experience. As well as, the role of faith-based communities in recovery, and levels of care in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina.     Joy comes with over a decade of professional experience in working with children, adolescents, adults, and their families at all levels of care (ranging from inpatient to outpatient clinical care).  As a Licensed Professional Counselor, she specializes in working with individuals, couples, and families who have issues with communication, family transitions including divorce, trauma, depression, anxiety, substance use, and disordered eating/eating disorders.  Currently, as a Treatment Placement Specialist with Acadia Healthcare, she walks every day in her passion. "I'm not here to keep you from freaking out. I'm here to be with you while you freak out, or grieve or laugh or suffer or sing. It is a ministry of presence. It is showing up with a loving heart."  This mantra sits at the core of all that Joy Ssebikindu does, both personally and professionally.
Published: October 2, 2020
Multimedia
Ask the Expert August's Open Dialogue is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will focus on openly dialoguing about the role you play in impacting access and retention of in substance abuse treatment while shedding light on the racial and LGBTQ+ disparities for GA, AL, FL, MS, SC, NC, KY, and TN. Session Host: Lawrence Bryant, Ph.D., MPH, RRT, BSW, AAS ============================================================================================  Health Equity and Implicit Racial Bias Experiences by the LGBTQ+ Community Seeking Treatment & Recovery   Resource Mentioned:  Georgia Opioid Strategic Planning, Multi-Cultural Needs Assessment   ============================================================================================================ A Little About Dr. Bryant:  As a member of the Georgia Department of Public Health Opioid Strategic Planning Multicultural Workgroup, Dr. Bryant brings a plethora of experiences dealing with substance use disorders through clinical practice, policy, and research. He has been successful in developing and implementing a statewide strategic plan for the state of Georgia in response to the opioid and prescription drug overdose epidemic. As a part-time Assistant Professor at Kennesaw State University, Health Promotion Department, Dr. Bryant has received funding from The Georgia Department of Public Health to do a needs assessment in support of the Statewide Strategic Plan for Opioid Abuse. Dr. Bryant just receives certification in contact tracing and plans to utilize this knowledge to train others in this technique Dr. Bryant continues to publish in the field of public health and holds dual positions in both public health and psychology at Capella University. Dr. Bryant is also a registered respiratory therapist, fighting on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic in the field of pediatrics
Published: September 3, 2020
Multimedia
This webinar is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will focus on the following for GA, AL, FL, MS, SC, NC, KY, and TN: - Examining issues and trends in substance use disorders - Exploring 12 step programs as a catalyst for change - Exploring Faith-based organizations as a catalyst for change As a member of the Georgia Department of Public Health Opioid Strategic Planning Multicultural Workgroup,       ===========================================================   Lawrence Bryant, Ph.D., MPH, RRT, BSW, AAS   Dr. Bryant brings a plethora of experiences dealing with substance use disorders through clinical practice, policy, and research. He has been successful in developing and implementing a statewide strategic plan for the state of Georgia in response to the opioid and prescription drug overdose epidemic. As a part-time Assistant Professor at Kennesaw State University, Health Promotion Department, Dr. Bryant has received funding from Georgia Department of Public Health to do a needs assessment in support of the Statewide Strategic Plan for Opioid Abuse. Dr. Bryant just receives certification in contact tracing and plans to utilize this knowledge to train others in this technique Dr. Bryant continues to publish in the field of public health and holds dual positions in both public health and psychology at Capella University. Dr. Bryant is also a registered respiratory therapist, fighting on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic in the field of pediatrics.
Published: August 6, 2020
Multimedia
    Keynote Presentation from the Annual Inter-Faith Institute on Recovery     Nzinga A. Harrison, MD A well-respected physician and educator, Dr. Harrison is the CoFounder and Chief Medical Officer for Eleanor Health, an innovative provider of comprehensive treatment for opioid and other substance use disorders. She earned her bachelor’s degree in Biology with Spanish and Chemistry minors at Howard University, completed medical school at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and General Psychiatry Residency at Emory University. She is Board-Certified in both Adult General Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine and has spent her career treating individuals with Serious Persistent Mental Illness and Addictive Diseases. Currently, she holds adjunct faculty appointment at the Morehouse School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and provides expert consultant services to the Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center. She is Co-Founder of Physicians for Criminal Justice Reform, Inc. and Campaign Psychiatrist for Let’s Get Mentally Fit, a public education and stigma-reduction campaign.
Published: August 5, 2020
1 2

The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

map-markermagnifiercrossmenuchevron-down