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eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The October 2023 issue honors National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, National Youth Substance Use Prevention Month, Hispanic Heritage Month, World Mental Health Day (October 10), and the newest installment of the NIATx in New Places blog series on the ATTC/NIATx Service Improvement Blog! As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!
Published: October 5, 2023
Print Media
The Tip card provides a brief review of information that providers need to know about traumatic brain injury and behavioral health/substance use disorders. It summarizes the key points from the TBI toolkit that is also available on the website.
Published: March 15, 2022
Print Media
The Client Workbook for Substance Use and Brain Injury was developed by the SUBI Project Team Second Edition (2021) Carolyn Lemsky, PhD, CPsych, ABPP/ABCN, Tim Godden, MSW, RSW, Advanced Practice Clinician and Maria Crowley, MA, CRC-Consultation, Editing, and Design, the National Association of State Head Injury Administrators (NASHIA). It is available online for free and it can be used in conjunction with the TBI Toolkit developed in collaboration with Region 7 Mid-America ATTC.
Published: March 1, 2022
Toolkit
  Traumatic Brain Injury and Substance Use Disorder Toolkit now available!!   Traumatic Brain Injury and Substance Use Disorders: Making the Connections merges the content on traumatic brain injury (TBI) and substance use disorders (SUD) to expand capacity to address both issues in treatment. The author, Dr. Carolyn Lemsky, is a board-certified neuropsychologist with over 25 years of experience working in rehabilitation settings in the U.S. and Canada. The toolkit provides valuable and practical information for advancing behavioral health providers’ capacity when serving persons who have brain injuries.   This toolkit is a collaboration between the National Association of State Head Injury Administrators, Mountain Plains Addiction Technology Transfer Center (Mountain Plains ATTC), and the Mid-America Addiction Technology Transfer Center (Mid-America ATTC).   Order a copy of the Traumatic Brain Injury and Substance Use Disorder Toolkit    
Published: October 27, 2021
Multimedia
Recursos Adicionales Diapositivas de presentación   Esta presentación definirá la violencia doméstica y la violencia de pareja íntima y proporcionará estadísticas sobre la prevalencia de violencia doméstica en los Estados Unidos. La presentación explicará ¿Por qué las víctimas de la violencia domestica permanecen en este tipo de relación? La presentación ensenara por que la violencia doméstica y la violencia de pareja íntima no discriminan entre estatus socioeconómico, raza o etnicidad. La violencia doméstica y la violencia de pareja íntima son comportamientos aprendidos que son causados ​​por la necesidad de obtener poder y control sobre otra persona. Las víctimas de violencia doméstica o violencia de pareja íntima pueden recurrir a usar sustancias para tratar de sobrellevar el dolor, la vergüenza y la culpa. Esto solo exacerba el trauma porque puede provocar adicción y trastornos concurrentes. Objetivos de aprendizaje: Definir los tipos de violencia doméstica y violencia de pareja íntima Identificar las causas de la violencia doméstica y la violencia de pareja íntima Reconocer por qué una víctima de violencia doméstica o violencia de pareja íntima puede abusar substancias para reducir el dolor Identificar formas de lidiar con el trauma Identificar formas de encontrar ayuda Glory McDaniel, MA, LAC, LPCC, NCC, capacitada en EMDR La Sra. Glory McDaniel es una terapeuta bilingüe que trabaja con el tratamiento específico de los trastornos concurrentes por uso de sustancias y el estrés postraumático, liderando grupos en inglés y español, educando a la comunidad y brindando consejería individual. Es miembro de la junta directiva de la Asociación de Profesionales de la Adicción de Colorado (CAAP) y facilitadora de grupos de Remendando el Alma para mujeres sobrevivientes de violencia doméstica (DV) y / o violencia de pareja íntima (IPV), centrándose en la curación de problemas físicos, psicológicos. abuso emocional, financiero y espiritual. En 2020, la Sra. McDaniel fundó Crisálida, Inc., un refugio sin fines de lucro para mujeres y niños abusados.
Published: June 24, 2021
Multimedia
The Mountain Plains and Mid-America Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (ATTCs) are proud to partner with the National Association of State Head Injury Administrators (NASHIA) to present seven virtual trainings focused on the significant intersection between brain injury and addiction. The trainings consist of an introductory session followed by six special topic webinars. Special topics will include the intersection of brain injury with addictions, intimate partner violence, suicide, as well as special considerations for individual and group therapy. The final session will be focused on the introduction of a Brain Injury and Addictions Toolkit.   Domestic violence is a complex public health issue with a widespread impact on individuals, communities, and society. Many survivors of abuse also struggle with substances. This presentation will introduce the role of domestic violence and other abusive tactics—specifically mental health and substance use coercion--as additional drivers of substance misuse and addiction. To add another layer of complexity, a critically important consequence of domestic violence has been hidden in plain sight for decades—brain injury. This webinar will share what we have learned from groundbreaking research in Ohio on the intersection of brain injury and domestic violence, as well as a service provision framework called CARE (Connect, Acknowledge, Respond, Evaluate). You will leave with tools to assist you in raising awareness and addressing partner-inflicted brain injury in your services and help you better support the unique needs of people impacted by domestic violence, brain injury, and addiction.   Describe at least three ways that domestic violence can contribute to the substance misuse challenges and addiction. Learn how to use the CARE framework as a guide for working with people experiencing a brain injury, domestic violence, and addiction. Identify resources (including CARE tools) to assist you in educating, identifying, and accommodating for brain injury in your programming.   Presenter: Rachel Ramirez, MA, MSW, LISW-S, RA Rachel Ramirez is the Founder and Director of The Center on Partner-Inflicted Brain Injury, a project of the Ohio Domestic Violence Network (ODVN). Rachel is currently directing the Center’s first federal grant from the Office on Violence Against Women to increase collaboration and develop training and services for the brain injury, domestic violence, and sexual assault fields. Over the past 13 years at ODVN, Rachel has led multiple statewide initiatives on trauma-informed approaches as well as other topics. She has trained hundreds of audiences and co-authored Trauma-Informed Approaches: Promising Practices and Protocols for Ohio’s Domestic Violence Programs, as well as peer-reviewed journal articles in the Journal of Family Violence and the Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma. Rachel is a bilingual licensed independent social worker and a registered advocate with senior standing in Ohio. Video Link
Published: March 31, 2021
Multimedia
S2 E5: Serving Marginalized Communities x Impacts of IPV In this episode, we focus our attention on substance use coercion including the common forms, the effects on survivors, and how providers address the needs equitably by integrating services. Our conversation suggests that integrated services uniquely benefit survivors and are associated with decreased substance use and experiences of violence. We highlight this topic as new resources have been released from the National Center on Domestic violence, Trauma, and Mental Health in late 2020. Resources: Substance Use Coercion as a Barrier to Safety, Recovery, and Economic Stability: Implications for Policy, Research, and Practice: Technical Expert Meeting Summary and Report Understanding Substance Use Coercion in the Context of Intimate Partner Violence: Implications for Policy and Practice: Summary of Findings Literature Review: Intimate Partner Violence, Substance Use Coercion, and the Need for Integrated Service Models       Gabriela Zapata-Alma, LCSW, CADC, Director of Policy and Practice on Domestic Violence and Substance Use, National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health | [email protected] Gabriela Zapata-Alma, LCSW, CADC, is the Director of Policy and Practice on Domestic Violence and Substance Use at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health, as well as a senior lecturer and coordinator of the addiction training program at the University of Chicago’s School of Social Service Administration. Gabriela brings over 15 years of experience supporting people impacted by structural and interpersonal violence. Currently, Gabriela's author's best practices provide trauma-informed policy consultation to advance racial equity, as well as capacity building related to serving marginalized communities impacted by violence, trauma, and other social determinants of health, nationally, and internationally.
Published: March 29, 2021
Multimedia
This training session and panel discussion were provided to the Fargo-Moorehead YWCA, and their partners, in response to a technical assistance request received by the Mountain Plains Mental Health Technology Transfer Center and Mountain Plains Addiction Technology Transfer Center. Panel Discussion: Trauma in the Context of Interpersonal Violence: A Systems Response Marvis Doster, CARN, Tracy Evanson, Ph.D., Chris Harsell, ANP, Thomasine Heitkamp, LCSW, Kim Miller, LMAC/LPCC, and Maridee Shogren. This panel will explore the intersection of trauma, substance use, and intimate partner violence and share decades of experience providing substance use and mental health services to individuals with a history of trauma and intimate partner violence. The new product Rural Intimate Partner Violence Survivors and Substance Use Disorders: Implications for SUD Treatment and Recovery Providers will be unveiled.
Published: March 26, 2021
Multimedia
Webinar series hosted in partnership with the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) Network Coordinating Office, Mountain Plains ATTC, and the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health (NCDVTMH). This first webinar features an interactive panel discussion to begin the conversation and provide resources to address both substance use disorder and intimate partner violence.   Intimate partner violence (IPV) can have significant effects on one’s health, including increased risk for substance use concerns. In addition to using substances in order to cope with experiences of violence, survivors may also be coerced to use substances, face increased violence if they do not use substances, and have their attempts to engage treatment and recovery sabotaged by a partner or ex-partner – all tactics of substance use coercion. Many substance use specialists and domestic violence advocates feel unprepared to help survivors address concerns related to substance use and substance use coercion. Watch the Webinar:  
Published: March 25, 2021
Multimedia
Intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization can result in numerous physical and behavioral health conditions. IPV cuts across all demographics and all geographical locations. However, rural communities experience unique concerns that may contribute to IPV, and IPV survivors living in rural areas face unique challenges. This presentation will describe these factors specific to rural populations experiencing IPV and implications for behavioral health practitioners regarding service delivery.   Presenter: Tracy A. Evanson, Ph.D., RN, PHNA-BC is a Professor at the University of North Dakota and member of the Mountain Plains ATTC team. Dr. Evanson has an extensive background in intimate partner violence (IPV), working with women and children victims in shelters, corrections, and home settings.  
Published: September 28, 2020
Multimedia
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a pervasive health problem. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) data indicate that one in four women and one in nine men have been victims of sexual violence, physical violence, or stalking in their lifetime. Substance use disorders (SUDs) commonly co-exist with IPV. Among people with SUDs, researchers have consistently found high rates of both current and lifetime IPV.  Similarly, studies have also shown that victims of IPV are more likely to have a SUD, compared to those who have not experienced IPV. This presentation will discuss the intersection between IPV and SUDs, how the dynamics of IPV contribute to SUDs, and the needs of clients who experience both.   Learning Objectives: Examine the intersection between IPV and SUDs Identify the needs of clients/patients who are experiencing IPV and SUD Identify strategies for engagement   Presenter: Dr. Tracy A. Evanson, PhD, RN, PHNA-BC    
Published: July 27, 2020
Multimedia
Additional Resources Download Webinar Slides Translations     This presentation defines domestic violence (DV) and intimate partner violence (IPV) and provide statistics on the prevalence of DV in the United States. Why do victims of violence stay in this type of relationship? Domestic violence and intimate partner violence do not discriminate between socioeconomic statuses, race, or ethnicity. Domestic violence and intimate partner violence are learned behaviors that are caused by the need for power and control over another person. Victims of DV or IPV may turn to substances to try to cope with the pain, shame and guilt. This only exacerbates the trauma because it may lead to addiction and co-occurring disorders. Learning objectives: Define the types of domestic violence and intimate partner violence Identify causes of domestic violence and intimate partner violence Recognize why a victim of domestic violence or intimate partner violence might turn to addiction Identify ways of coping with trauma Identify ways of finding help Speaker Glory McDaniel, MA, LPCC, LAC, NCC In May of 2018, Glory McDaniel earned her Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Program from Denver Seminary. Mrs. McDaniel is a bilingual therapist working with specific treatment of co-occurring substance use disorders and posttraumatic stress, addiction, and mental illness, leading both English and Spanish groups, educating the community as well as individual counseling. She serves on the board of the Colorado Association of Addiction Professionals (CAAP) and facilitator for Mending the Soul (MTS) groups for women survivors of abuse. Mrs. McDaniel earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Human Services with emphases in Domestic Violence Counseling and Addiction Counseling from the Metropolitan State University of Denver in 2013. She interned with the Center for Trauma and Resilience, formerly known as Denver Center for Crime Victims (DCCV), and later joined the Colorado Organization of Victim Assistance (COVA) as their Human Trafficking Case Manager. Mrs. McDaniel believes in helping others by providing support, counseling, and education on various topics such as domestic violence, sexual assault, child abuse, anxiety, depression, mental illness, and substance use disorder.  Her ultimate career goal is to establish a nonprofit and start a shelter for women who have/are experiencing abuse and provide them with necessary skills that will empower them to become self-sufficient and live a happy, healthy and prosperous life.
Published: February 25, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
Featuring bullying prevention, Mental Health Awareness Week, PTTS award, Central East on the Move, new resources, Region 3 news, Monthly Health Check, and affirmations.
Published: October 3, 2018
Presentation Slides
This presentation by Professor Katherine Sorsdahl discusses the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) training model with applications in the South African context. Katherine Sorsdahl is a Professor and the Co-Director of the Alan J Flisher Centre for Public Mental Health at the University of Cape Town. She also serves as Expert Curriculum Development Advisor for the South Africa HIV ATTC.
Published: September 20, 2018
Presentation Slides
This presentation by Professor Bronwyn Myers discusses the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) training model in application to substance use disorders. Professor Bronwyn Myers is a Chief specialist scientist in the Alcohol Tobacco and Other Drug Use Research Unit at the South African Medical Research Council. Professor Myers also serves as an Expert Technical Assistance Advisor for the South Africa HIV ATTC.
Published: September 20, 2018
eNewsletter or Blog
Monthly electronic newsletter
Published: September 5, 2018
Presentation Slides
Presenter Harold Gates offers best practices for sustaining professional and organizational commitments to cultural competence and effective application of CLAS.
Published: August 8, 2018
eNewsletter or Blog
Monthly electronic newsletter highlighting Great Lakes ATTC training events and other topics.
Published: June 1, 2018
eNewsletter or Blog
Monthly electronic newsletter featuring Great Lakes ATTC training events and other topics.
Published: May 1, 2018
Print Media
This interview monograph, developed by the ATTC CoE-PPW, features the unique perspectives of leaders in the pregnant/postpartum women's treatment and recovery field. Through policy, research, and practice lenses, these leaders share how the field has broadened its scope to begin serving the whole family. Interviewees discuss the historical evolution toward family-centered care and next steps for improving care for families.
Published: September 29, 2017
Curriculum Package
This curriculum describes a family-centered approach to treatment, care, and supervision of pregnant and postpartum women (PPW) with a substance use disorder and their families. It contains six modules designed for delivery in 45-minute in-service sessions by a clinical supervisor or similar professional. The primary audience is addiction treatment providers and the secondary audience is their community partners. The curriculum contains trainer and participant manuals and slides.
Published: September 29, 2017
Multimedia
This vignette, part of the "Bring Them All" documentary, describes how SHIELDS for Families built its family-centered program.
Published: September 20, 2017
Multimedia
This vignette, part of the "Bring Them All" documentary, describes how SHIELDS for Families involves fathers in treatment.
Published: September 20, 2017
Curriculum Package, Multimedia, Other, Presentation Slides
The goal of this training course is teach participants how to develop their skills to deliver Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT). The assumption in designing this course is that participants have already completed the self-paced online course (Foundations of SBIRT) that introduced the topic of SBIRT. The aim of this training course is to help participants to (1) develop skills related to SBIRT, and to (2) begin a conversation around implementation of SBIRT.
Published: July 31, 2014
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The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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