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Multimedia, Presentation Slides
  Humor is a part of daily living that has been shown to improve mental, physical, and emotional health. Laughter can bring us through some of the darkest times when hope seems glim. Despite the benefits and need for laughter and humor, helping professionals are taught very little about the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery. In fact, it is sometimes discouraged in the helping professions. In this presentation you will learn strategies to incorporate humor in your work with clients.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By the end of this presentation, you will be able to: Understand the research on the benefits of using humor to improve physical, mental and emotional health Use humor more effectively in your work with clients Use humor to improve rapport with clients and to help clients grow in recovery Use humor to help reduce burnout and increase organizational morale   PRESENTERS: Tom Farley Tom Farley grew up in Madison, WI and graduated from Georgetown University with a degree in Marketing.  He began his career in banking and finance, living and working in the New York City area.  From 1999 to 2012, he ran The Chris Farley Foundation, a nationally recognized non-profit dedicated to substance abuse prevention. Like his brother, Tom was successful in opening the “eyes and ears” of youth audiences through the powerful and effective use of humor.  In 2008 he wrote “The Chris Farley Show”, a New York Time bestselling biography of his late brother, the actor and comedian Chris Farley.  He has been interviewed on The Today Show, Good Morning America, Larry King Live, Fox News and The View. He has also been featured in People Magazine, USA Today and several national and regional newspapers and publications. Tom has served on the Dane County Human Services board and several non-profit boards. Tom works for Rosecrance Behavioral Health as the Professional Relations Coordinator for Wisconsin. He is also a motivational speaker, delivering messages on prevention and recovery. Tom lives in Madison, WI.   Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, is the Illinois state project manager for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. He is an international speaker and behavioral health consultant whose presentations and publications have reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, West Indies, Lithuania, and Guam. He is the recipient of four lifetime achievement awards, including NAADAC’s prestigious Enlightenment Award, the National Association for Addiction Professionals’ 50th Anniversary Legends Award, the Illinois Certification Board's Professional of the Year Award and Jessica Hayes Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Barbara Bacon Award for outstanding contributions to the social work profession as an alumnus of Loyola University of Chicago.  Mark is the author of five books on behavioral health recovery. Recent writings include Slipping Through the Cracks: Intervention Strategies for Clients with Multiple Addictions Disorders and Relationship Detox: A Counselors Guide To Helping Clients Develop Healthy Relationships In Recovery. His groundbreaking monograph, Recovery Management, co-authored with historians William White and Earnest Kurtz, helped shift substance use disorders treatment and recovery from the acute care model towards a recovery-oriented system of care. Mark is the primary contributing author of a trauma-informed gun violence prevention curriculum which is now being implemented in several large cities throughout the U.S., and he authored two stories published in the New York Times bestselling Chicken Soup for The Soul book series. In addition to his behavioral healthcare work, Mark has a 30-year career as a university educator, having taught at The University of Chicago, Loyola University of Chicago, and Illinois State University School of Social Work. He is also the co-founder of Serenity Academy Chicago, a program which sponsors recovery-oriented peer groups in local high schools.   The Great Lakes A/MHTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: June 5, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The March 2024 issue spotlights content celebrating Women's History Month and National Social Work Month. It also features updated versions of the Sustainability Planning in Prevention Guidebook and Sustainability Planning in Prevention Toolkit, as well as upcoming trainings focused on provider well-being and culturally responsive services for Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) clients. As always, you will also find links to all scheduled events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC! Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!  
Published: March 18, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
Dr. Nora Volkow is the Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health. Her research sheds light on one of the most important indicators that someone will or will not reach out for support for their substance use: stigma.[1] She states that: "The words we use to describe mental illnesses and substance use disorders (addiction to alcohol and other legal and illegal drugs) can impact the likelihood that people will seek help and the quality of the help they receive. Research indicates that stigma—negative attitudes toward people based on distinguishing characteristics—contributes in multiple ways to poorer health outcomes; consequently, it has been identified as a critical focus for research and interventions."[2] Addiction, along with mental health challenges, have long been some of the most stigmatized conditions. Countless research studies show that when there are stigmatizing attitudes, fewer people reach out for help. This is especially concerning considering the percentages of people who don’t receive the treatment they need (nearly 90% of the people who need support for their substance use challenges or addiction do not get it).[3] The Words We Use Matter How we talk about addiction and recovery matters. Not just because of the words we say, but because of the words we hear—and what our loved ones hear and in turn, can internalize. Research from 2019 shows that nearly 20% of people who needed help didn’t get it because they were concerned about what their neighbors or community would think.[4] There are things that we can do as loved ones to learn how to talk about addiction and also why this matters—and how it can help end addiction stigma. Understanding the science of addiction and recovery is a first step. You may be like me (not a neuroscientist) and that’s okay. There’s a way to understand what happens on a physical level when we experience substance use disorder or substance misuse challenges. Flo Hilliard, MSH, founding member of Faces & Voices of Recovery and expert in the field of addiction science explains it this way: "Many medical conditions, like Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular disease, are linked to not only a genetic predisposition but also to patterns or habits that can lead to "turning on" the gene for that condition. Substance use disorders often follow the same pattern, yet there is often stigma and shame attached to the normal progression of the medical condition. Understanding the basic brain science of addiction and recovery is a fundamental step in eliminating stigma and treating those suffering from this disorder as respected human beings. Research shows that with the proper treatment and support people can and do recover from addiction to alcohol and other drugs to have successful professional and personal lives." When we understand that addiction is a normal part of the human experience, it loses its ability to be framed as something requiring punitive measures. Something that causes shame. It lacks the power to divide into “us vs. them.” Addiction or substance use disorders are worthy of our understanding and compassion. There are some excellent resources out there, including ones through the ATTC network, including their Addiction Science Made Easy Series, that share information about the science of addiction and recovery so we not only understand it but understand how to talk about it. How We Talk About Addiction Recovery Matters There are simple ways that you can talk about addiction and recovery that decrease stigma. The National Institute on Drug Abuse or NIDA shares these helpful ways to talk about addiction recovery:[5],[6] Use person-first language Promote community education about addiction Share recovery stories Education programs for folks who work with those of us in or seeking recovery like doctors, nurses, treatment providers, counselors, and church leaders Here is another helpful resource from SAMHSA: Overcoming Stigma Ending Discrimination. Check out this helpful chart from NIDA: Words Matter - Terms to Use and Avoid When Talking About Addiction. Women and Addiction Stigma Stigma is even more prevalent for women, especially mothers, and women of color, and this has been known for decades.[7] It's part of why I founded and host the annual event with the SHE RECOVERS foundation that highlights and celebrates women’s recovery during Women’s History Month on International Women’s Day every year. This year, we are focusing on highlighting the next generation and why it’s important to not only share stories of recovery but also share what works in terms of recovery support services. Gathering as a global community of supporters of recovery is not only an incredible experience, it has a purpose: to help reduce the addiction recovery stigma that women face.[8] Since women, especially from under-resourced and underserved communities, experience higher levels of addiction stigma and are thus, less likely to seek support, we all must work to address this issue that impacts millions. When we share our stories of recovery in the light, it can illuminate hope for others and show that recovery is possible. When we use supportive and hope-filled language, we can be a part of eradicating the stigma and discrimination that has no place in our recovery-oriented world today. Join us this March and celebrate. For more information and to register for free visit: https://sherecovers.org/international-womens-day-2024/ Time and date don’t work for you? No problem! Register for a link to watch on demand any time or plan your own watch party.   Caroline Beidler, MSW is an author, recovery advocate, and founder of the storytelling platform Circle of Chairs. With almost 20 years in leadership within social work and ministry, she is currently a consultant with JBS International, along with the founder and host of the annual International Women’s Day Global Recovery Event presented by the SHE RECOVERS Foundation. Connect with her @carolinebeidler_official and  https://www.facebook.com/carolinebeidlermsw   [1] Volkow, N.D., Gordon, J.A. & Koob, G.F. Choosing appropriate language to reduce the stigma around mental illness and substance use disorders. Neuropsychopharmacol. 46, 2230–2232 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-021-01069-4 [2] National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Ending Discrimination Against People with Mental and Substance Use Disorders: the Evidence for Stigma Change. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2016. https://doi.org/10.17226/23442. [3] Hammarlund R, Crapanzano KA, Luce L, Mulligan L, Ward KM. Review of the effects of self-stigma and perceived social stigma on the treatment-seeking decisions of individuals with drug- and alcohol-use disorders. Subst Abus Rehabil. 2018;9:115–36. https://doi.org/10.2147/SAR.S183256. Published 2018 Nov 23. [4] Han B. Key substance use and mental health indicators in the United States: results from the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (HHS Publication No. PEP20-07-01-001, NSDUH Series H-55). Rockville, MD: Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; 2020. [5] Volkow, N.D., Gordon, J.A. & Koob, G.F. Choosing appropriate language to reduce the stigma around mental illness and substance use disorders. Neuropsychopharmacol. 46, 2230–2232 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-021-01069-4 [6] Livingston, J. D., Milne, T., Fang, M. L., & Amari, E. (2012). The effectiveness of interventions for reducing stigma related to substance use disorders: a systematic review. Addiction (Abingdon, England), 107(1), 39–50. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2011.03601.x [7] Radcliffe P. Motherhood, Pregnancy, and the Negotiation of Identity: The Moral Career of Drug Treatment. Social Science & Medicine. 2011;72:984–991. [8] Page, S., Fedorowicz, S., McCormack, F., Whitehead, S. (2024). Women, Addictions, Mental Health, Dishonesty, and Crime Stigma: Solutions to Reduce the Social Harms of Stigma. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 21(1):63. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21010063
Published: March 5, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The January 2024 issue features the third installment of the Counselor's Corner blog series: Integrating Spirituality and Counseling with African American Clients, information on the Opioid Response Network's 2022-2023 regional summits, and a call for applications for the upcoming HEART (Healing Ethno And Racial Trauma) Training for Behavioral Health Providers Serving Hispanic & Latinx Communities intensive training series. As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!   Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: January 11, 2024
Multimedia
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is an umbrella term that refers to a wide range of life-long physical, cognitive, and behavioral effects that can occur as a result of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE).  Additionally, individuals with FASD often struggle with co-occurring substance use and mental health challenges and may benefit from modifications to treatment that take into consideration the cognitive, behavioral and adaptive functioning challenges that are common across the spectrum.  This presentation will provide the attendee with a brief overview of FASD, information regarding assessment and diagnosis, and suggestions for ways to tailor treatment/intervention to support success. Presenter Dr. Joanne Sparrow is a clinical psychologist in private practice currently licensed in Washington and Colorado; she works primarily with adults who present with histories of complex trauma/post-traumatic stress disorder, mood and anxiety disorders, and substance use disorders. View recording Download handouts: Common Messages: Guidelines for Talking and Writing About FASD (CanFASD.ca) Language Guide: Promoting Dignity for Those Impacted by FASD (Canada NW FASD Partnership) FASD: Preferred UK Language Guide (National Organisation for FASD) Life History Screen (Grant T et al. 2013) Moving Towards FASD-Informed Care in Substance Use Treatment (CanFASD.ca) Safety Plan (TherapistAid.com)        
Published: December 14, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The November 2023 issue honors National Native American Heritage Month, National Homelessness Awareness Month, and a brand-new Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy intensive technical assistance opportunity. As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list, so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter and thank you for reading!
Published: November 7, 2023
Multimedia
  Substance use disorder is a biopsychosocial disease that impacts women differently than men. There are varying treatment approaches for men and women that are vital for effective treatment. Stigma continues to be a barrier for women accessing treatment and treatment providers offering care. Historically, women in the United States have had less access to treatment, and they still do today. Furthermore, socioeconomic factors may significantly affect a woman's ability to achieve long-term sobriety. This workshop will shed light on common emotional and physical differences experienced by women before, during, and after treatment as compared to their male counterparts. We will also discuss common treatment issues and considerations for clinicians, peers, law enforcement, family members, and more.   TRAINER Ashley Yassall, MPA, PMP Ashley's experience and education lie in the nonprofit, for-profit, and government sectors. She has held various leadership positions in behavioral health and excels at project management, task execution, and her ability to improve organizations. Ashley is the Principal Consultant and Owner of Ashley Ryan Consulting LLC, a nonprofit-focused consulting firm supporting project management, compliance/accreditation, program evaluation, and other practice management needs. Ashley was previously the executive director at the Women’s Recovery Center (WRC) in Cleveland, Ohio. At WRC, she and the team increased revenue by 40% from 2018 to 2022 (from $700,000 to a $1.2 million budget). She led the organization to achieve the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) in 2021. Ashley works part-time for Catholic Charities Corporation in Cleveland at Matt Talbot residential facility. Ashley is a CDCA (Chemical Dependency Counseling Assistant in Ohio) and seeking her LCDC II (Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor II Licensure in Ohio) by the end of 2023. Ashley achieved her MPA from the University of North Carolina in August 2022. Ashley earned her Project Management Professional (PMP) credential in February 2023. Ashley is pursuing her Certified Change Management Professional (CCMP) in 2024. Ashley holds a bachelor's in actuarial science/mathematics from The Ohio State University.     The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: October 25, 2023
Multimedia
DESCRIPTION: These resources are being developed from an ongoing learning collaborative for supervisors and mentors of pregnant and parenting women (PPW) programs. Although the application deadline to attend the live learning collaborative sessions has closed, the Great Lakes ATTC is making the content and recordings from these sessions publicly available so those working in PPW programs can benefit from the information and best practices being shared. New materials will be added to this page after the conclusion of each session, so don't forget to check back throughout the summer!  This free learning collaborative is funded by the Great Lakes ATTC.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Develop and hone the skills that foster well-being across teams. Explore interpersonal micro-moments you can leverage in staff meetings, supervision, and day-to-day interactions to create an enabling context for well-being among team members.   RECORDINGS AND HANDOUTS: June 8, 2023 Session 1 - Well-being in the Workplace Starts with You: Core Components of Sustaining Your Own Self-care and Fostering Work–Life Harmony as a Team   July 13, 2023 Session 2: Leading from the Inside Out: Lean Into Your Strengths and Values   August 10, 2023 Session 3: Being a Beacon of Belonging: Build Bold, Inclusive Spaces That Enable Psychological Safety       September 14, 2023 Session 4: Activating Agency: Help Each Team Member Succeed by Fostering Intentionality, Anticipation, Action, and Self-reflection     TRAINERS: Tara Fischer, MSW, LICSW, is a senior program manager II for Advocates for Human Potential (AHP) who brings 28 years of practice in the behavioral health field. She has extensive experience providing clinical direct care and designing, implementing, and monitoring behavioral healthcare service delivery improvements for public sector organizations. Ms. Fischer provides training, technical assistance (TA), and consultation to health and human service organizations to strengthen the workforce’s capacity to address behavioral health needs, coordinate care, and mitigate social determinants of health. She has developed and implemented trainings, learning collaboratives, and job aids to support the provision of care coordination, crisis response, contingency management, trauma-informed supervision, person-centered care planning, and specialized services for PPW with substance use disorders (SUDs). Additionally, she has managed multiple TA projects under the Massachusetts Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment Program as well as a multimillion-dollar Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) project for the State of Illinois aimed at supporting employee mental health and well-being in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Her experience as a behavioral healthcare administrator, provider, clinician, and consultant spans multiple settings, including outpatient, residential, Medicaid managed care, state mental health authority, primary care, accountable care, and family-driven, youth guided systems of care. She holds a master of social Work degree from Simmons University and is a licensed independent clinical social worker (LICSW).   Tiffany Malone, MA, is a senior program manager at AHP with 20 years of experience. She supports the Mentored Internship Program (MIP), which is part of the Behavioral Health Workforce Development efforts of the California Department of Health Care Services. As the lead grantee coach, Ms. Malone delivers training and TA for behavioral health organizations developing mentored internship programs to help expand California’s behavioral health workforce. Her work includes using data from surveys to create SMART goals; creating implementation plans to support the identified goals; conducting monthly webinars and 1:1 coaching calls; collaborating with grantees, outside vendors, and other key stakeholders to organize and facilitate affinity groups and learning collaboratives; and providing support to the internal MIP team to ensure successful implementation of the MIP project. Ms. Malone has expertise in in-person, virtual, and self-paced training and TA development and facilitation on several different platforms. She has extensive hands-on experience in all levels of management, including performance management, quality assurance, coaching, virtual instructor-led training and development, and remote team management. Ms. Malone holds an M.A. in teaching applied behavior analysis from National University.   Chantal Laperle, MA, CPHQ, PCMH, CCE, CTL, is a senior program manager at AHP. She has more than 25 years of experience in project management and oversight, having managed state and federal contracts from grant proposal initiation through award, implementation, reporting, and closeout. Ms. Laperle also has extensive coaching experience in the development, implementation, and monitoring of health initiatives aimed at improving the care of our country’s most vulnerable populations. She has held many leadership positions in both public and private sectors, using her clinical and operational experience to effect change. She has hands-on experience coaching teams through the development, implementation, and monitoring of quality improvement initiatives. Ms. Laperle is widely experienced in accreditation and recognition programs from The Joint Commission (TJC), the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF), and the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC). She is a Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality (CPHQ) and certified in healthcare risk management through the University of Florida. She is also certified in advanced facilitation and the 7 Tools of Quality Control through GOAL/QPC, has been an instructor for Nonviolent Crisis Intervention (CPI), and is a Certified Content Expert (CCE) through NCQA. Ms. Laperle is from a family that has experience with and understanding of the impact mental health and substance use issues can have. She holds an M.A. in counseling psychology from Lesley University.   Linzi A. Jack, MA, is a senior program associate I with AHP. She has more than 10 years of experience in inpatient and outpatient behavioral health settings working with a variety of populations including individuals living with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders. Ms. Jack supports the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Behavioral Health Technical Assistance and the Hub and Spoke State Opioid Response III projects. She aims to ensure that participating Federally Qualified Health Centers are supported and equipped to provide equitable, high-quality health care for all. Before joining AHP, Ms. Jack was a public health analyst and immunization quality improvement program consultant for the District of Columbia’s Health Department (DC Health) Immunization Division. She has an extensive background in helping primary care centers implement programs such as the NCQA Patient Centered Medical Home Certification and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Immunization Quality Improvement for Providers program. SMs. Jack holds a B.S. in psychology from Howard University and an M.A. in integrative health and wellness coaching from the Maryland University of Integrative Health. She also earned a nationally recognized coaching certification from the National Board for Health and Wellness Coaching.   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.  
Published: June 15, 2023
Print Media
This Issue: LAYING GROUNDWORK FOR A HARVEST AND HEALTHY YEAR This issue will bring a reflection by our Program Director, celebrating Women’s History Month. The National Hispanic Latino Executive Leadership and Fellowship Program's project manager recently had a training that provided a brief presentation about the leadership program, shared  some of the highlights of the program and its outcomes regarding strengthening the Hispanic and Latino behavioral health workforce and growing our own. Please read to learn more about the resources we are highlighting this quarter, our upcoming events and projects, and more. In This Issue 01 Dicho of the Quarter 02 A Reflection by Our Director 03 Quarterly Highlights, and Celebrations 04 NHL Executive Leadership and Fellowship Program 05 Media Corner 06 Staff Contact Information Esta edición traerá una reflexión de nuestra Directora de Programas, celebrando el Mes de la Historia de la Mujer. El gerente de proyecto del Programa Nacional de Becas y Liderazgo Ejecutivo Hispano Latino recientemente brindó una breve presentación sobre el programa de liderazgo, compartió algunos de los aspectos más destacados del programa y sus resultados con respecto al fortalecimiento de la fuerza laboral de salud mental hispana y latina y el crecimiento de la nuestra. Lea para obtener más información sobre los recursos que destacamos este trimestre, nuestros próximos eventos y proyectos, y más. 01 El Dicho del Trimestre 02 Reflexion de Nuestra Directora 03 Hechos destacados del Trimestre y Celebraciones 04 Programa Nacional de Liderazgo y Becas para Ejecutivos Hispanos y Latinos 05 Rincón de los Medios 06 Información de Contacto del Personal
Published: April 7, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
Due to the length of the articles written by our authors, the March 2023 Dialogue newsletter was split into two parts. Part 1 was published March 7 and Part 2 was published March 14. Part 2 of the March newsletter contains articles: MHTTC: Celebrating Women in Medicine | Regional Spotlight: Sean's House. Additional sections include behavioral health observances and virtual training and webinar events. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the HHS Region 3/Central East region. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected].   Sign up to receive the Dialogue and our weekly training bulletin in your mailbox.   Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: March 14, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The March 2023 issue honors National Women's History Month by sharing resources from the Mental Health Technology Transfer (MHTTC) Network that focus on an array of behavioral health issues affecting women and girls. This issue also features an exciting, new intensive technical assistance training series sponsored by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.  As always, The Great Lakes Current provides links to all the upcoming events and trainings for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   
Published: March 10, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The February 2023 issue honors National Black History Month by sharing resources and content from the African American Behavioral Health Center of Excellence and SAMHSA that focus on how social determinants of health have affected the health and well-being of African Americans, as well as the importance of providing culturally responsive behavioral health services. This issue also features exciting, new training opportunities sponsored by the Great Lakes PTTC, the ATTC Network's Pearls of Wisdom blog series, and the final article of the Power of Music series by Mark Sanders and Kisha Freed.  As always, The Great Lakes Current provides links to all the upcoming events and trainings for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   
Published: February 7, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
The September 2022 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction:  Families in Recovery | Mental Health:  National Suicide Prevention Month | Prevention:  Suicide Prevention Awareness | ORN:  Mobilize Recovery, and Regional Spotlight: A Journey to Recovery, by Demetrie Garner. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected].   Sign up to receive the Dialogue and our weekly training bulletin in your mailbox.   Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: September 6, 2022
Multimedia
The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.     Great Lakes ATTC Spring Webinar Series: Reaching and Retaining Pregnant & Parenting Teens & Young Adults Recording     DESCRIPTION: Adolescence and young adulthood are fraught with complexities.  When pregnancy, parenting, and substance use concerns are layered on, the combination can be overwhelming for the young person—and for you! This session focuses on understanding risk factors for substance use, leveraging resiliency factors, and using creative engagement strategies to reach and retain pregnant and parenting teens and young adults, as well as their families.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Identify three resiliency factors for pregnant and parenting adolescents and young adults with SUDs. Identify three considerations for addressing the dual needs of parenting teens or young adults with SUDs and the needs of their children. Explain how co-parenting, teen dating violence, and foster care involvement impacts pregnant and parenting adolescents with SUDs.         TRAINERS: Euna Ra-Smith, LCSW, is a senior program manager at Advocates for Human Potential (AHP) and a program manager for the California Youth Opioid Response. She has served as a clinician, senior director and chief clinical officer in child, adolescent, and young adult serving agencies for nearly two decades.  She has worked exclusively in diverse settings, including overseeing adolescent residential treatment services for youth involved in the juvenile justice system, unsheltered transitional aged youth, and community-based outpatient services.   Veronica Welch, MS, is a Program Associate II at Advocates for Human Potential (AHP), where she provides TA and support for implementation of mobile crisis and justice interventions in California.  Her past work experience includes clinical work with young families on bonding and attachment, as well as individual therapy with families and children in the child welfare system. She possesses a B.S. in child development and a M.S. in marriage, child, and family therapy.
Published: July 25, 2022
Multimedia
The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.   Great Lakes ATTC Spring Webinar Series: Updates on Pregnancy, Alcohol Use, and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Recording   DESCRIPTION: Alcohol use during pregnancy can result in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). While early interventions and treatment for illicit use of opioids, stimulants, and other substances during pregnancy are critical, people often lose sight of the fact that alcohol use can have the most devastating and lasting effects, including permanent brain damage. Many adults have undiagnosed FASD, which results in cognitive and behavioral challenges that increase their risks of negative outcomes. This webinar will feature a panel discussion providing insights from a parent raising a child with FASD and updates on research and best practices for FASD prevention, early interventions, accommodations, and recovery supports.       LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Identify challenges for adults with FASD and two strategies to support them during pregnancy List two early interventions to improve development for infants or children with FASD Describe the effects of alcohol use during pregnancy and three interventions to prevent FASD Describe effective supports across the life span for people with FASD and their families     Trainers: Kathleen West, DPh, is a senior program director for Advocates for Human Potential (AHP) with more than 40 years of experience in the areas of SUD treatment and prevention and expertise on perinatal substance use in its multiple biologic, developmental, and social contexts, often including interactions with justice and child welfare systems. Dr. West has helped establish gender-specific substance use and co-occurring disorder treatment programs for women and their children, and promulgated policy change regarding care for PPW, child welfare systems change, and behavioral health services in both domestic and international settings.      Candice Russell, B.S., is a senior program associate at AHP, where she works with grantees to implement medications for addiction treatment services in California. Ms. Russell specializes in providing equity-driven training and technical assistance (TTA) to entities that are developing capacity and a workforce aimed at treating mental health and addiction disorders. Prior to joining AHP, Ms. Russell worked for the National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors (NASADAD) to support the State Women’s Services Coordinators in improving PPW services.      Sarah Farmer, M.A., is the communications manager and a senior health writer for AHP. She also is the adoptive mother of an adult daughter with FASD, part of the national FASD parent community, and board member for two parent-led efforts to develop adult residential, therapeutic living for people with FASD. 
Published: June 23, 2022
Multimedia
The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.   Great Lakes ATTC Spring Webinar Series: Pregnant Women and Marijuana–Special Considerations Recording     DESCRIPTION: This session focuses on navigating conversations with pregnant women about the growing trends of cannabis and e-cigarette use. Health risks will be examined, and participants will learn about the research on the perceived risks of cannabis and tobacco use. Best practices in screening for cannabis and e-cigarette use will be explored and strategies for educating pregnant women and addressing cannabis use will be shared.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: • Differentiate known and perceived risks • List predictors of cannabis use in pregnancy • Describe how perceived risk can impact cannabis and tobacco use by pregnant women • Identify key factors for educating pregnant women about cannabis use       TRAINERS: Linda Frazier, MA, RN, MCHES, Director of Addictions Initiatives at Advocates for Human Potential (AHP), has extensive leadership and consulting experience with more than 30 years’ experience in a variety of clinical settings, including outpatient behavioral health, medications for addiction treatment (MAT), women’s health, adolescent, and college health. Ms. Frazier served as associate director of treatment and recovery services for the Maine Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Office of Behavioral Health. She has served on the leadership team of the American Public Health Association Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs Section since 2009 and is currently the Past Chair.   Elizabeth Carla Lemos, CADC, Senior Program Manager at Advocates for Human Potential (AHP), has been delivering substance use disorder treatment services for more than twenty years. Her experience includes serving as the program director of a PPW residen­tial program, director of re-entry services for an agency on Los Angeles’ Skid Row, and supervisor for a substance use program for individuals while incarcerated. She is currently completing her master’s degree at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.
Published: May 24, 2022
Multimedia
  Podcast hosts will discuss how alcohol use and the risk for alcohol-related problems change over women’s lifespan from adolescence to college-age, early careers, pregnancy, parenting, empty-nest, retirement and aging. The podcast episodes will feature conversations with the hosts and guest speakers on topics such as: Women, Alcohol and Health Disparities Social and Cultural Contexts of Alcohol Use Media Messages about Women and Alcohol Use Women’s Alcohol Use during the Pandemic Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and more  
Published: May 17, 2022
Multimedia
The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.   Alcohol is STILL a Drug: An Exploratory Webinar Series (May 3, 2022) Recording     DESCRIPTION  Alcohol is STILL a drug.  The opioid crisis, increase in stimulant misuse, and marijuana legalization dominate the news— yet alcohol remains the number one substance causing health, social, legal and financial problems throughout the US. While this series will focus on the hopefulness of recovery from alcohol use disorder, we’ll also take a deep dive into what we know about the full impact of alcohol overuse and the ways it affects every person in the US.     SPEAKER Gabriela Zapata-Alma, LCSW, CADC Gabriela Zapata-Alma, LCSW, CADC, is the Associate Director at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health, as well as a lecturer at the University of Chicago, where they direct the Alcohol and Other Drug Counselor Training Program. Gabriela brings over 15 years of experience supporting people impacted by structural and interpersonal violence and their traumatic effects through evidence-based clinical, housing, resource advocacy, and HIV-specific integrated care programs. Currently, Gabriela authors best practices, leads national capacity-building efforts, and provides trauma-informed policy consultation to advance health equity and social justice.     SERIES LEARNING OBJECTIVES These are the overall learning objectives for the full 10-session series:  Summarize the current impacts of problematic alcohol use in various/special populations, including pregnant women, youth, rural, and minority populations.  Assess and prioritize alcohol reduction efforts in targeted settings.  Describe the current efforts to curb problematic alcohol use, including best practices in providing treatment. 
Published: May 4, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The March 2022 issue features Women's History Month, the Counselor's Corner blog, and a complete calendar of events. 
Published: March 28, 2022
Print Media
The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on March 09, 2022 from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM. This discussion reviewed the article, “Hoots and harm reduction: a qualitative study identifying gaps in overdose prevention among women who smoke drugs.”  View the March 2022 RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: March 17, 2022
Multimedia
    The Great Lakes ATTC offers this training for behavioral health professionals in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, Oh, and WI. This training is offered in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.   DESCRIPTION: Behavioral health programs that thrive in the future will be those that do the best job of creative an inclusive organization. Staff appreciation, feelings of inclusion, and happiness have a direct impact on quality client care. In this skill-building virtual presentation, participants will learn why cultural humility is a more realistic goal than cultural competence. Topics will include how to help your co-workers feel appreciated, how to have a discussion of differences, microaggressions, micro-insults, and micro-invalidations; and a six- step strategy to repair damage if you insult a co-worker. Join this webinar to learn how to be a diversity change agent in the workplace and create an inclusive organization.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Repair damage if you inadvertently commit a microaggression or insult in the workplace. Help co-workers feel appreciated regardless of differences. Be a diversity change agent. Create an inclusive organization.       TRAINER Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, is the State Project Manager for the Great Lakes ATTC. Mark is also an international speaker, trainer, and consultant in the behavioral health field whose work has reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, Caribbean and British Islands.
Published: August 12, 2021
Print Media
The Mid-America Addiction Technology Transfer Center (Mid-America ATTC) and the Missouri Credentialing Board in Region 7 are sponsoring a 2-part training for peer specialists/recovery coaches and supervisors of peer specialists who want to develop expertise in serving pregnant and parenting families impacted by substance use and/or opioid dependence. The training will include the following: Two, full day virtual training sessions; Six, 1.5-hour virtual Peer-to-Peer Learning Collaborative sessions. The training will be September 9th and 10th and the Learning Collaborative will be held twice monthly following the completion of the training. Download the application to learn more. 
Published: June 21, 2021
Multimedia
This is the final session of the 3-part series Embracing Pregnant & Parenting Families Challenged with Substance Use Disorder. After the session, participants will be able to: Recognize data relevant to addiction and recovery in the United States Define stigma and examine its impact upon individuals experiencing addiction and those in recovery Discuss implicit bias and examine strategies to examine and reduce our own unconscious bias Illustrate the power of language in relationship to stigma and contrast stigmatizing language with the language of recovery Identify actions each member of the health care team can take to reduce the impact of stigma Click here to watch the presentation Presenter Information: Sharon Hesseltine, BSW, is President and CEO of Intentional Development, providing consultation, facilitation and training to strengthen services for pregnant and parenting families who have substance use disorders, adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and trauma. For over 30 years Sharon has worked in Public Health and specialized in early childhood development, women’s health, substance use disorder and recovery.  
Published: June 9, 2021
Multimedia
View the resources from the 2nd session of the 3-part series Embracing Pregnant & Parenting Families Challenged with Substance Use Disorder. After the session, participants will be able to: Describe evidence-based treatment for pregnant women with an opioid use disorder Recognize the impact of parent involvement in the care of newborns experiencing Neonatal Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome Develop skills and strategies to positively impact the parent-child relationship among parents with a substance use disorder   Presenter Information: Sharon Hesseltine, BSW, is President and CEO of Intentional Development, providing consultation, facilitation and training to strengthen services for pregnant and parenting families who have substance use disorders, adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and trauma. For over 30 years Sharon has worked in Public Health and specialized in early childhood development, women’s health, substance use disorder and recovery.     Click here to watch the presentation
Published: June 2, 2021
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The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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