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Multimedia
Additional Resources Download Webinar Slides Translations     This presentation defines domestic violence (DV) and intimate partner violence (IPV) and provide statistics on the prevalence of DV in the United States. Why do victims of violence stay in this type of relationship? Domestic violence and intimate partner violence do not discriminate between socioeconomic statuses, race, or ethnicity. Domestic violence and intimate partner violence are learned behaviors that are caused by the need for power and control over another person. Victims of DV or IPV may turn to substances to try to cope with the pain, shame and guilt. This only exacerbates the trauma because it may lead to addiction and co-occurring disorders. Learning objectives: Define the types of domestic violence and intimate partner violence Identify causes of domestic violence and intimate partner violence Recognize why a victim of domestic violence or intimate partner violence might turn to addiction Identify ways of coping with trauma Identify ways of finding help Speaker Glory McDaniel, MA, LPCC, LAC, NCC In May of 2018, Glory McDaniel earned her Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Program from Denver Seminary. Mrs. McDaniel is a bilingual therapist working with specific treatment of co-occurring substance use disorders and posttraumatic stress, addiction, and mental illness, leading both English and Spanish groups, educating the community as well as individual counseling. She serves on the board of the Colorado Association of Addiction Professionals (CAAP) and facilitator for Mending the Soul (MTS) groups for women survivors of abuse. Mrs. McDaniel earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Human Services with emphases in Domestic Violence Counseling and Addiction Counseling from the Metropolitan State University of Denver in 2013. She interned with the Center for Trauma and Resilience, formerly known as Denver Center for Crime Victims (DCCV), and later joined the Colorado Organization of Victim Assistance (COVA) as their Human Trafficking Case Manager. Mrs. McDaniel believes in helping others by providing support, counseling, and education on various topics such as domestic violence, sexual assault, child abuse, anxiety, depression, mental illness, and substance use disorder.  Her ultimate career goal is to establish a nonprofit and start a shelter for women who have/are experiencing abuse and provide them with necessary skills that will empower them to become self-sufficient and live a happy, healthy and prosperous life.
Published: February 25, 2020
Multimedia
Safe, stable, and affordable housing is increasingly recognized as a vital part of recovery. What role can substance use disorder treatment and recovery programs play in providing this essential need for their clients? Find out the basics of housing and how to get started in this 6-session virtual learning community series! By the end of session 2, participants will be able to: Define the family first philosophy as it relates to housing as an intervention. Identify special considerations in supportive housing for women and children with their families, and transitional youth. Determine key community partners to engage in supportive housing for families and transitional youth. This series is a collaboration among the HHS Region 7  Technology Transfer Centers (Mid-America Addiction Technology Transfer Center [ATTC], Prevention Technology Transfer Center [PTTC], and Mental Health Technology Transfer Center [MHTTC]).
Published: September 13, 2019
Toolkit
The Opioid Response Network and Mid-America ATTC have partnered to produce the Perinatal Provider Toolkit. It is a centralized online reference to help health care providers quickly access reputable resource information on perinatal substance use for patient treatment and education. The toolkit is for any member of the healthcare team serving pregnant and postpartum women with substance use disorders (SUD). Resources are organized into healthcare provider guidance and patient education tools that providers can use to explain the health effects of perinatal substance use to their patients. Resources cover the full spectrum of substances, including alcohol, opioids, marijuana, methamphetamine, tobacco, and others.
Published: September 12, 2019
Multimedia
The National CLAS Standards are intended to advance health equity, improve quality, and help eliminate health care disparities. This webinar will discuss how health care organizations need to ensure that awareness, adoption, and implementation of the National CLAS Standards are incorporated to have a more inclusive definition of culture in order to better serve victims and survivors of the human trafficking. OBJECTIVES: Highlights of the enhanced CLAS Standards that contribute to positive health outcomes for clients Understand the distinctions between victims, survivors, and thrivers Identify risk factors for victims and survivors of human trafficking Understand the barriers to engagement How to assess your agency and community service PRESENTERS: JACQUELINE COLEMAN MEd, MSM, BA, CPC Certified Professional Coach     BRYTTANI DEBRO M.P.A Change Agent for the Voiceless
Published: July 31, 2019
Multimedia
The National CLAS Standards are intended to advance health equity, improve quality, and help eliminate health care disparities. This webinar will discuss how health care organizations need to ensure that awareness, adoption, and implementation of the National CLAS Standards are incorporated to have a more inclusive definition of culture in order to better serve women. (Note: this webinar was a joint effort between the Central East ATTC and the Central East MHTTC.) OBJECTIVES: Highlights enhanced CLAS Standards that contribute to positive health outcomes for women in the United States Increased awareness of the health and wellness of women of all ages Impacts of health equity and the range of specialty health areas for women’s behavioral health Perspectives on the importance of women’s health Insights into how providers can best address differing women’s health needs from men’s   PRESENTERS:  Jacqueline Coleman  MEd, MSM, BA, CPC  Certified Professional Coach     Phronie Jackson PhD Founder of WALK  
Published: June 21, 2019
Multimedia
This is Part 2 of a two-part webinar series titled: The Intersection of Traditional Medicine and Behavioral Health in the Latinx Community.   Click the buttons below to view this webinar translated in Spanish or Portuguese     Community Centered Emergency Room Project a program of Social Model Recovery Systems aims to highlight the connection between culture and health-seeking behaviors while focusing in the role women play in family health decisions making. Our focus group findings show that women are the pillars of health and transcend generational/gender believes. Our focus group also sought to include the health-seeking behaviors of adults age 50+ as well as youth to better understand how they use medications and if there is a preference
Published: May 28, 2019
Print Media
    Drugs can alter the way people think, feel, and behave by disrupting neurotransmission, the process of communication between neurons (nerve cells) in the brain. Many scientific studies conducted over decades have established that drug dependence and addiction are features of an organic brain disorder caused by drugs’ cumulative impacts on neurotransmission. Scientists continue to build on this essential understanding with experiments to further elucidate the physiological factors that make a person prone to using drugs, as well as the full dimensions and progression of the disorder. This infographic is to assist special populations, providers and organizations in explaining specific neurotransmitters, their affects, and specific drugs that affect them. 
Published: May 24, 2019
Website
The Family Recovery Pathways conference was held in Sioux Falls, SD on May 6-8, 2019, developed by the HHS Region 7 Mid-America Addiction Technology Transfer Center (Mid-America ATTC) and HHS Region 8 Mountain Plains Addiction Technology Transfer Center (Mountain Plains ATTC). This conference also had support from the Region 8 Mountain Plains Prevention Technology Transfer Center (Mountain Plains PTTC) and the ATTC Network Coordinating Office. The goal of the Family Recovery Pathways conference was to bring together professionals who engage with families impacted by substance use disorders to learn best practices in working in the child welfare and substance use disorder system. A total of 275 people representing 20 states attended throughout the three-day conference. Conference presentations featured more than 50 presenters and panelists addressing such topics as Adverse Childhood Experiences, Policy Approaches to Support Family-Centered Care, and Pregnancy and Parenting in the Midst of a Methamphetamine Epidemic. Presentations are available for download by clicking https://attcnetwork.org/centers/mountain-plains-attc/bring-them-all
Published: May 8, 2019
Multimedia
This webinar, sponsored by the Northwest ATTC and the Western States Node of the NIDA CTN, summarized what makes women's treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD) or other substance use disorders unique from men's treatment, and highlighted key issues when providing treatment to pregnant and parenting women with opioid use and other SUDs. Presenters: Hendree Jones, PhD (Executive Director, UNC Horizons; Professor OBGYN, UNC Chapel Hill) and Carl Seashore, MD (Professor of Pediatrics, UNC Chapel Hill) Download slides | Watch recording Webinar category: Specific populations
Published: April 18, 2019
eNewsletter or Blog
The March 2019 Dialogue feature: Addiction: SUD Screening for Women | Mental Health: Women and Mental Health | Prevention: Tailoring SUD Prevention Services for women | ORN: Suboxone Program. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, Region 3 news, and Region 3 Spotlight: PTTC Regional Webinar Series. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. We encourage you to provide any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. If you would like to be added to our mailing list to receive the Dialogue, news, and training announcements, sign up here.
Published: March 5, 2019
Presentation Slides
This presentation by Professor Katherine Sorsdahl discusses the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) training model with applications in the South African context. Katherine Sorsdahl is a Professor and the Co-Director of the Alan J Flisher Centre for Public Mental Health at the University of Cape Town. She also serves as Expert Curriculum Development Advisor for the South Africa HIV ATTC.
Published: September 20, 2018
Presentation Slides
This presentation by Professor Bronwyn Myers discusses the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) training model in application to substance use disorders. Professor Bronwyn Myers is a Chief specialist scientist in the Alcohol Tobacco and Other Drug Use Research Unit at the South African Medical Research Council. Professor Myers also serves as an Expert Technical Assistance Advisor for the South Africa HIV ATTC.
Published: September 20, 2018
eNewsletter or Blog
Monthly electronic newsletter
Published: September 5, 2018
eNewsletter or Blog
Monthly electronic newsletter featuring Great Lakes ATTC training events and other topics.
Published: May 1, 2018
eNewsletter or Blog
Electronic newsletter announcing training and events in Great Lakes ATTC region. Writer/editor: Maureen Fitzgerald
Published: February 1, 2018
Presentation Slides
This presentation described a simple screening tool for pregnancy intention. One Key Question was originally developed by and is the intellectual property of the Oregon Foundation for Reproductive Health. Presented by Sounivone Phanthavong.
Published: October 11, 2017
Curriculum Package
This curriculum describes a family-centered approach to treatment, care, and supervision of pregnant and postpartum women (PPW) with a substance use disorder and their families. It contains six modules designed for delivery in 45-minute in-service sessions by a clinical supervisor or similar professional. The primary audience is addiction treatment providers and the secondary audience is their community partners. The curriculum contains trainer and participant manuals and slides.
Published: September 29, 2017
Print Media
This interview monograph, developed by the ATTC CoE-PPW, features the unique perspectives of leaders in the pregnant/postpartum women's treatment and recovery field. Through policy, research, and practice lenses, these leaders share how the field has broadened its scope to begin serving the whole family. Interviewees discuss the historical evolution toward family-centered care and next steps for improving care for families.
Published: September 29, 2017
Curriculum Package
Caring for and Empowering Women with Substance Use Disorders is an e-learning series that features courses for clinicians and staff who work with and support women in treatment and recovery. In this course, Reproductive and Sexual Health, participants will have the opportunity to learn more about family planning and sexually transmitted infections among women who misuse substances. This course includes interactive activities and short video clips narrated by Dr. Hendree Jones.
Published: September 29, 2017
Multimedia
This vignette, part of the "Bring Them All" documentary, describes how SHIELDS for Families built its family-centered program.
Published: September 20, 2017
Multimedia
Addiction is a family disease. Yet mothers are often treated in isolation from their children and partners, having to choose between getting treatment and keeping their families together. One revolutionary program in Compton, California lets women bring them all -- fathers/partners and children of all ages -- to experience the recovery journey together. "Bring Them All" tells the story of family-centered care through the perspectives of clients and staff at SHIELDS for Families.
Published: September 20, 2017
Multimedia
This vignette, part of the "Bring Them All" documentary, describes how SHIELDS for Families empowers clients in their roles as parents.
Published: September 20, 2017
Multimedia
This vignette, part of the "Bring Them All" documentary, describes the comprehensive array of services available to children of all ages at SHIELDS for Families.
Published: September 20, 2017
Multimedia
This vignette, part of the "Bring Them All" documentary, describes how SHIELDS for Families involves fathers in treatment.
Published: September 20, 2017
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The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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