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Print Media
Fatal overdoses are skyrocketing, and rates of substance use remain high, demonstrating the need to expand substance use disorder (SUD) treatment. In 2020, fatal overdoses in the Central East increased 25% (from 9,909 to 12,377), with overdose rates above the national average in every state except Virginia. Rates of substance use and SUD are persistently elevated. Funding additional treatment services and expanding access to existing treatment can help address the problem. This factsheet provides statistics and justifications for increasing SUD treatment.
Published: May 28, 2022
Print Media
Fatal substance-involved overdoses have significantly worsened over the COVID-19 pandemic. Long a major public health concern in the Central East region and nationwide, fatal overdoses are growing faster than rates of substance use. Overdoses are occurring across all ages, races, ethnicities, genders, and geographic areas [CDC]. Fentanyl is the largest driver of the explosion in overdoses. But overdoses of other substances—particularly methamphetamine—have also increased dramatically. In 2020, the Central East contained 9 of the 10 counties and independent cities with the highest fatal overdose rates in the United States. Over 80% (87) of the counties and cities in the region with reliable data had an overdose rate above the national average. The overdose rate in 31 jurisdictions was at least double the national average. And the fatal overdose rate was three to six times the national average in 11 counties in West Virginia; in Baltimore City and Cecil County, Maryland; and in Petersburg City, Virginia.
Published: May 27, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The March 2022 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Consequences of Stigma | Mental Health: Older Americans and Mental Health | Prevention: National Prevention Week | ORN: Prevention Is Important | Regional Spotlight: The Tides that Bink, Inc. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected]. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox. Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: May 5, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The March 2022 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Equity-Grounded Leadership | Mental Health: Decreasing the Risk of Suicide for Black Boys | Prevention: Prevention Gambling | ORN: Peer Based Training | Regional Spotlight: Lost Dreams Awakening. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected]. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox. Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: March 1, 2022
Print Media
The Central East Addiction Technology Transfer Center (CE-ATTC), funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and operated by The Danya Institute, contracted with The College for Behavioral Health Leadership (CBHL) to develop a report describing and defining EquityGrounded Leadership for use by behavioral health leaders in Health and Human Services Region 3 states. This report builds on the Institute’s ongoing efforts to improve diversity, increase cultural competency, and address population-specific needs of people receiving and delivering behavioral health services in Region 3. CBHL partnered with Just Health Collective and the Prevention Institute to develop this report. The purpose is to define and describe equity-grounded leadership, incorporating the experiences and perspectives of Region 3 behavioral health leaders via a survey, key informant interviews, and focus groups; make the case for the importance of focusing on equity as an foundational element of leadership; and offer recommendations for local, state, and national leaders and policy makers. Region 3 is a diverse region including Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. With a population of nearly 31,000,000 people, the region consists of a mix of dense, urban metropolitan areas and rural communities. Two-thirds of the population overall is White, and one-third are residents of color, but significant diversity is seen by state and community. Clear racial disparities exist in three indicators of health equity—poverty, education, and home ownership—across the region. Data on regional diversity of the behavioral health workforce and leadership are unavailable, but anecdotally are widely believed to comprise White females. WEBINAR Thursday, March 24, 1:00 PM, will provide an overview of the report development and outcomes, key takeaways for organizations and communities, and a description of and discussion about the importance of equity-grounded leadership. We will also seek your feedback on what is needed next to support equity-grounded leadership in Region 3. PRESENTERS: Oscar Morgan, Interim Executive Director, The Danya Institute, Project Director, Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Dr. Jei Africa, Director, Marin County Behavioral Health and Recovery Services Kathy Poston, Chief Engagement Officer, Just Health Collective, LLC Ruben Cantu, Associate Program Director, Prevention Institute This publication was prepared for the Central East Addiction Technology Transfer Center (CE-ATTC) under a cooperative agreement from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). All material appearing in this publication, except that taken directly from copyrighted sources, is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission from SAMHSA or the authors. Citation of the source is appreciated. Do not reproduce or distribute this publication for a fee without specific, written authorization from the CE-ATTC. At the time of this publication, Miriam E. Delphin-Rittmon, PhD, served as Assistant Secretary of Mental Health Services and Substance Use and the Administrator of SAMHSA. The opinions expressed herein are the view of CE-ATTC and the authors and do not reflect the official position of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), SAMHSA. No official support or endorsement of HHS, SAMHSA for the opinions described in this document is intended or should be inferred.
Published: March 1, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The January 2022 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Resolutions | Mental Health: Supporting the Well-being of Healthcare Professionals During COVID-19 | Prevention: The Importance of Prevention and Mentoring | ORN: Mentoring Mobile Clinics for Rural Areas | Regional Spotlight: The Clubhouse, a program of Ashley Addiction Treatment. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected]. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox. Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: January 4, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The November 2021 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Native Americans & the Opioid Crisis | Mental Health: Spread Kindness | Prevention: Veterans and Substance Use Prevention | ORN: Mobile Clinics Reach Rural Areas | Spotlight: Dr. Ala Stanford Center for Health Equity (ASHE). Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected]. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox. Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: November 3, 2021
eNewsletter or Blog
The September 2021 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Exploring Equity-Grounded Leadership and Recovery Stories | Mental Health: Saving Young Black Lives: Reversing Suicide Trends [Podcast] | Prevention: The Importance of Suicide Prevention and Recovery Services | ORN: Recovery Rising | Spotlight: Suicide Prevention Month. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected]. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox.
Published: September 7, 2021
eNewsletter or Blog
The July 2021 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: NIH Studies Mobile Clinics for HIV and SUD Treatment and Recovery Stories | Mental Health: Looking Back While Moving Forward: National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month | Prevention: BIPOC Mental Health Month | ORN: Compassion Fatigue | Region 3 Spotlight: WV Behavioral Health Workforce and Health Equity Training Center. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected]. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox.
Published: July 6, 2021
eNewsletter or Blog
The May 2021 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: New Buprenorphine Practice Guidelines & National Trauma Awareness Month | Mental Health: National Mental Health Awareness Month | Prevention: National Prevention Week 2021 & HIV Prevention | ORN: Fighting Stigma | Spotlight: Queer Affirming Therapy and DEA's Community Outreach Section. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected]. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox.
Published: May 4, 2021
eNewsletter or Blog
As we enter National Trauma Awareness Month, I’d like to pause for a moment to consider what we know about the families of individuals living with substance use disorders… and more importantly what we don’t know. Numbers and trends: In 2019 there were 70,630 deaths attributed to overdose[i]. Estimating accurate numbers of all non-fatal overdoses in the community is challenging – we can only track what is reported/treated. We can estimate the number of nonfatal overdoses treated in emergency departments (EDs) – approximately 967,615 in 2017[ii]. Since COVID-19 started, the numbers of suspected opioid and stimulant related overdoses being treated in EDs is up despite general trends of people delaying or avoiding care in EDs due to the pandemic[iii]. For both overdose deaths and nonfatal overdoses treated in EDs the highest rates were amongst adults ages 25-54, prime periods for parenting children, adolescents, and young adults.   Sadly, we do not know how many of those individuals experiencing overdoses were parents – to my knowledge that data is not being collected. Research on the impacts of substance use on families continues to fall frustratingly behind in research, national discussions, and policy initiatives[iv]. Why should we fill these gaps in data and policy? Data tells us its badly needed. Children and adolescents who grow up in households with substance misuse are at a higher risk for: developing mental health problems iv using substances in general and develop substance use disorders iv accidental opioid poisoning iv experiencing overdoses themselves[v] … and parental substance continues to rise as a contributing factor for child removal and CPS involvement[vi]. Add to the experience of courtesy stigma -  the idea that some people avoid or distance themselves from family members of those living with substance use disorders – and the outlook seems bleak for the young people in our systems of care. BUT…. We also have a lot of promising data on how we can support the families of people living with SUDs. What can we do? We can work with families to foster resilience and connections. Resilience involves maintaining flexibility and balance in life as you deal with stressful circumstances and traumatic events. Some ways to foster resilience include: Allowing for the experience strong emotions, and also realizing when they may need to avoid experiencing them at times in order to continue functioning. Stepping forward and taking action to deal with problems and meet the demands of daily living, and also stepping back to rest and reenergize. Spending time with loved ones to gain support and encouragement, and also nurturing themselves. Supporting efforts to make connections – strengthening old connections and developing new, positive ones Perspective taking including looking beyond the current stressors to a more hopeful future, looking at setbacks and relapses as learning experiences, and nurturing positive self-images and moving beyond stigmatizing labels applied to them and family members Modeling and encouraging relying on others, and also relying on themselves. Adopting a spirit of experimentation including trying a variety of coping skills, relaxation strategies and self-care practices to see which are the best fit for that individual For more information on fostering resilience check out the resources shared by the American Psychological Association and PositivePsychology.com. We can also be more inclusive of families in our systems by reflecting on and addressing stigma in our individual approaches to working with people and in our organizations: Include the voices of families and natural supports in policy in planning Adopt a recovery-orientation in organizational mission, vision, values, hiring practices, and training Practice intentional self-reflection about our own implicit biases and use that awareness to avoid missteps and take corrective measures Promote collaboration with families and natural supports in treatment planning and implementation Offer supports to families either by developing capacity in your organization or by developing a network of providers to refer to and collaborate with Provide education about substance use, addiction and recovery with materials adapted to be developmentally appropriate for children, adolescents and young adults Create a welcoming environment for service participants and their families Collect data to support systems level advocacy Working in our field is beautifully challenging because we cannot treat symptoms like substance use in isolation. Substance use occurs within the context of life lived in a body filled with thoughts, feelings and physical sensations, in a family, in a community, in an environment, in a society. While it may seem daunting to adopt a holistic approach that includes addressing the needs of the whole person in the context of their lives, this approach works. When we foster resilience and connection, we have the potential to start a ripple effect where our services’ impacts move beyond the individuals in care to their families, to future generations, to communities. We do this work as a community of providers to support our own resilience. We are in this together. By Kristen Wright, M.S., LCPC, Central East ATTC contributor About the author: Kris has been working full time in the behavioral health field since 2007, beginning with supportive and interdisciplinary services. She received her independent license as a therapist in 2011. Her licenses allow her to provide mental health counseling and therapy in Virginia and Maryland to individuals, families and groups. She is experienced working with adults of all ages and adolescents living with behavioral health concerns including mood disorders, substance-related disorders, and trauma histories. Kris has seen that everyone faces challenges in life that can impact their mental health. She is passionate about helping her clients renew hope and get excited about life again. Many of them have challenges with anxiety, depression, low motivation, post-traumatic stress, interpersonal problems, substance use getting in the way of day to day life, and work/school related issues. Regardless of the situations they are dealing with, she teaches her clients practical tools that everyone can use to improve their mental health, enjoy life and increase resiliency. Kris’ work is holistic and person-centered. She uses the best evidence-supported behavioral health interventions, identifies and addresses the impacts and influences of all areas of a person’s life on their mental and behavioral health. Her approach has a special focus on employment, somatic, environmental and cultural factors. Her practice includes interventions from Cognitive and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies, Motivational Interviewing, Person-Centered Care Planning, Mind-Body Practices and Vocational Supports. In addition to work as a clinical therapist and as a trainer and consultant, Kris is honored to facilitate workshops for the American Red Cross’ Services to the Armed Forces serving service members, veterans, caregivers and families. She teaches Reconnections Workshops in Adult, Child and Mind Body modules providing psychoeducation, early identification of behavioral health symptoms, connections to resources, resiliency building, and health and wellness practices. She also teaches weekly yoga and mindfulness classes at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center at the inpatient behavioral health unit, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) unit, and cancer unit. Kris specializes in yoga for behavioral health and wellness, with training in Inner Power Yoga, Mindful Yoga Therapy, and Yin Yoga.  Visit her website: https://kriswrightwellness.com/ [i] Hedegaard H, Miniño AM, & Warner M. (2020).  Drug overdose deaths in the United States, 1999–2019. NCHS Data Brief, no 394. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db394-H.pdf [ii] Vivolo-Kantor AM, Hoots BE, Scholl L, et al. (2020).  Nonfatal Drug Overdoses Treated in Emergency Departments — United States, 2016–2017. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2020;69:371–376. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6913a3external icon. [iii] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021, February 16). Suspected Nonfatal Drug Overdoses during COVID-19. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/nonfatal/states/covid-19.html.  [iv] Winstanley, E. L., & Stover, A. N. (2019). The Impact of the Opioid Epidemic on Children and Adolescents. Clinical Therapeutics, 41(9), 1655–1662. https://doi-org.proxy-hs.researchport.umd.edu/10.1016/j.clinthera.2019.06.003 [v] Khan, N. F., Bateman, B. T., Landon, J. E., & Gagne, J. J. (2019). Association of Opioid Overdose With Opioid Prescriptions to Family Members. JAMA Internal Medicine, 179(9), 1186–1192. [vi] National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare. (n.d.). Child Welfare and Alcohol & Drug Use Statistics. Child Welfare and Alcohol & Drug Use Statistics | National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare (NCSACW). https://ncsacw.samhsa.gov/research/child-welfare-and-treatment-statistics.aspx.
Published: April 30, 2021
eNewsletter or Blog
The March 2021 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Recovery Stories in the African American Community | Mental Health: Supporting Youth Mental Health During COVID-19 | Prevention: Substance Use Prevention and Preventing Problem Gambling | ORN: Faith-Based Toolkit | Spotlight: Black Mental Wellness & NIH's UNITE initiative to end Structural racism. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected]. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox.
Published: March 2, 2021
eNewsletter or Blog
The January 2021 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: New Year. New Hope. Black History Month | Mental Health: Addressing Mental Health in the Black Community | Prevention: Substance Use Prevention and Mentoring | ORN: Mentoring | Region 3 Spotlight: Danya's new ORN hire. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected]. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox.    
Published: February 9, 2021
Presentation Slides
JMU Substance Use Disorder Education Virtual Conference An inter-professional training in SUDE/SBIRT for faculty and community partners. Holly Ireland, LCSW-C, Co-Director of the Central East ATTC presented the presentation at the conference: Implementing SBIRT: Substance Use Disorders Education. This was a closed event.
Published: October 16, 2020
Multimedia
DESCRIPTION: This conference will focus on the integration efforts that support a collaborative healthcare approach.  Current medical updates in services for STIs, HIV, TB, hepatitis, family planning and addictions will be discussed.   After completing this conference, the learner should be able to: State current practice in the care and treatment of STIs, HIV, TB, and hepatitis Explain how to screen clients for substance abuse issues Identify Population at risk for HIV/STIs/Mental Health and Substance Abuse Demonstrate effective team skills by sharing information effectively, listening and responding to feedback from others, and using simple communication   SESSIONS: Providing Culturally Competent Care | Speaker: Deborah Dunn Addictions, Treatment, Recovery in Pregnancy and Postpartum | Speaker: Mishka Terplan Day 1 (9/11) recording This virtual conference is provided in collaboration by: The STD/HIV Prevention Training Center, Mid-Atlantic AETC, Central East ATTC, National Family Planning and Reproductive Health Association, Rutgers Global Tuberculosis Institute, and DC Area Health and Education Centers-Georgetown University.
Published: September 25, 2020
Multimedia
DESCRIPTION: This conference will focus on the integration efforts that support a collaborative healthcare approach.  Current medical updates in services for STIs, HIV, TB, hepatitis, family planning and addictions will be discussed.  After completing this conference, the learner should be able to: State current practice in the care and treatment of STIs, HIV, TB, and hepatitis Explain how to screen clients for substance abuse issues Identify Population at risk for HIV/STIs/Mental Health and Substance Abuse Demonstrate effective team skills by sharing information effectively, listening and responding to feedback from others, and using simple communication   SESSIONS: Intro to FTCC | Speaker: Jeanne Hoover Addictions, Mental Health and Opioid Overview | Speaker: Renata Henry HIV/STIs and Opioid Use | Speaker: Adam Visconti The Intersection of Opiate Abuse, Mental Health Concerns, and Suicide Risk: A Collaborative Approach to Client Care | Speaker: Caroline Meyer Day 2 (9/25) recording This virtual conference is provided in collaboration by: The STD/HIV Prevention Training Center, Mid-Atlantic AETC, Central East ATTC, National Family Planning and Reproductive Health Association, Rutgers Global Tuberculosis Institute, and DC Area Health and Education Centers-Georgetown University.
Published: September 11, 2020
Multimedia
LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Provide an overview of telehealth and technology-based interventions best practices, HIPAA-compliance measures, and ethical considerations. Review all applicable Federal and Maryland telehealth practice regulations and policy expectations, including those related to the global pandemic emergency declaration. Offer an opportunity for interactive, real-time exploration of the application of telehealth skills, knowledge, and policy. Provide information about additional Federal and State resources for continued learning   PRESENTER: Jay Ostrowski, MA, LPC-S, NCC, ACS, BC-TMH, is an informative and entertaining trainer and expert in Telemental Health. As the CEO of Behavioral Health Innovation, he serves as a Telemental Health trainer and consultant for SAMHSA, HRSA, Universities, State governments and healthcare organizations. He’s the founder and Director of both the Telebehavioral Center of Excellence for the University of Virginia and the Board Certification in Telemental Health. He's created 9 peer-reviewed telemental health courses and designed/developed 12 telehealth software platforms to date, including Adaptive Telehealth, the most versatile telehealth software on the market. As a research partner with Harvard Medical School, Jay keeps up with the changing state license requirements for 8 healthcare professions across all US States and DC. He also serves as the go-to person for the Mid-Atlantic Telehealth Resource Center for Telemental Health providing Telebehavioral Health training and consultations. You can connect with Jay Ostrowski on LinkedIn or through any of the above organizations.   This webinar is provided in collaboration with the Maryland Department of Health Behavioral Health Administration, Central East Addiction Technology Transfer Center and Mid-Atlantic Telehealth Resource Center.   
Published: August 11, 2020
Multimedia
Maryland Reproductive Health Virtual Series: Implementing SBIRT: Family Planning and Reproductive Health Settings Description: The 2020 Maryland Reproductive Health Roundtable Virtual Series was a statewide, multiple sessions series spanning across three months to share education and information around reproductive health and family planning in the state of Maryland. These sessions invited public health professionals and clinical providers from city, county, and state agencies as well as health care institutions, community-based organizations, and academic partners. The topics addressed were based on priority challenges and opportunities in reproductive health care. Recordings of the sessions are below as well as corresponding resources. The 2020 Maryland Reproductive Health Roundtable Virtual Series was hosted by B’more for Healthy Babies, UChoose, Maryland Department of Health, and Morgan State University. Speakers: Holly Ireland, LCSW-C Holly is the Co-Project Director of the Central East ATTC. She has 30 years’ experience working in the behavioral health field, beginning her career as a Residential Rehabilitation Counselor while working on her undergraduate degree in psychology at Towson University. During her career, she has provided direct service in outpatient behavioral health and recovery support settings, including individual, group and family therapy for co-occurring disorders, crisis intervention, trauma treatment, Assertive Community Treatment, and advocacy. Holly also serves as adjunct faculty for Salisbury University’s Social Work Department, teaching social welfare policy and advanced practice courses.   Shelley Miller, MS Shelley Miller has worked in family planning and reproductive health for more than 35 years. She has served in a variety of roles including Director of Patient Services for a large Title X agency and Director of Training Performance Improvement for TRAINING 3, a regional training center. Shelley has provided consultation, coaching, training and technical assistance, both nationally and internationally. She currently works with the Central East ATTC as an independent consultant in its SBIRT implementation project with Title X.      
Published: July 28, 2020
Multimedia
The National CLAS Standards are intended to advance health equity, improve quality, and help eliminate health care disparities. This webinar will discuss how health care organizations need to ensure that awareness, adoption, and implementation of the National CLAS Standards are incorporated to have a more inclusive definition of culture in order to better serve persons living with HIV/AIDS. OBJECTIVES: Learn about quality and compassionate care services for persons living with HIV (PLWH) Discuss impact of stigma and discrimination on the overall wellness of PLWH Analyze emotional, physical and psychological needs of PLWH Explore trauma-informed principles and holistic health support Address behavioral health care and related HIV care services   PRESENTERS: Jacqueline Coleman, MEd, MSM, BA, CPC, certified professional coach with extensive experience as a senior program manager. Jacqueline has expertise in workforce development, organizational development and contract management. She is a cultivator and trainer of professionals in multiple sectors.  Jacqueline provides strategic consultation on LEADERVATION (gender-tailored programs, equity and diversity initiatives, and systems change processes).   Michelle Lopez, CASAC. BA, Healthy Aging Specialist at GMHC. Ms. Lopez serves the HIV Positive LGBT client population. Her services include individual mental health and substance use screenings, brief interventions, and referrals; and educational workshops relevant to the health of aging LGBT clients with HIV including physical, dental, and mental health. As a private consultant, Michelle was able to implement HIV care and services at a private primary care facility under the Medical Practice of Brooklyn Family Medical Center.
Published: June 17, 2020
Multimedia
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This virtual training course focuses on topics and issues for behavioral health supervisors to help enhance and expand your process as a clinical supervisor. Throughout the training, we will discuss a variety of supervision topics including various models of supervision, addressing ethical dilemmas with supervision, as well as technology and supervision. OBJECTIVES: Define the significant roles of clinical supervisors Explain the significance of a mentoring relationship in supervision Define the ethical issues in clinical supervision including dual relationships and confidentiality Analyze the ethical obligations and ethical decision-making of the supervisor Discuss the importance of collaboration in the development of an effective supervisory relationship Discuss the key benefits of using technology to extend the reach of clinical supervision   WHO SHOULD ATTEND: All persons who interact with patients, which may include intake staff, reception area personnel, drivers, maintenance staff, as well as professional staff. PRESENTERS: Anthony Estreet, Ph.D., LCSW-C, LCADC Executive Director, Next Step Treatment Center. Anthony is an Associate Professor at Morgan State University and is an experienced client-centered therapist with strength in developing and delivering effective training.
Published: June 12, 2020
Multimedia
Description: This 5-hour virtual conference focused on the integration efforts that support a collaborative healthcare approach. Professionals working in these areas were able to increase their knowledge of new updates in an interprofessional environment. These clinical updates are designed to assist in creating comprehensive screening protocols in primary care, substance use treatment, and infectious disease and sexual health clinics. Sessions: Enhancing Sexual Health History Taking HIV Biomedical Prevention: PrEP and PEP Screening Protocols Introduction to Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT): Clinical and Stigma Update   Intended Audience: Physicians, physicians assistants, nurses, nurse practitioners, case managers, social workers, students of health professions, and other members of the healthcare team. Professionals and students in infectious disease, sexual health and family planning, substance use, behavioral health, mental health, and primary care are welcome and encouraged to attend. This training is a collaboration between the Mid-Atlantic Education and Training Center, The Danya Institute, the Central East TTCs (ATTC, MHTTC, PTTC), and the STD/HIV Prevention Training Center at Johns Hopkins.
Published: June 9, 2020
Multimedia
The National CLAS Standards are intended to advance health equity, improve quality, and help eliminate health care disparities. This webinar will discuss how health care organizations need to ensure that awareness, adoption, and implementation of the National CLAS Standards are incorporated to have a more inclusive definition of culture in order to better serve transgender individuals. OBJECTIVES: Define CLAS standards, themes, and recommendations Understand strategies for addressing ‘real-life issues’ and health equity impact among transgender and intersex populations Learn about providing quality and compassionate care for adults, adolescents, and children who identify as transgender or gender-diverse or questioning their gender identity Explore gender minority stress treatment principles and support strategies Address behavioral health care and related CLAS standards for service to transgender and intersex populations   PRESENTERS: Jacqueline Coleman, MEd, MSM, BA, CPC, certified professional coach with extensive experience as a senior program manager. Jacqueline has expertise in workforce development, organizational development and contract management. She is a cultivator and trainer of professionals in multiple sectors.  Jacqueline provides strategic consultation on LEADERVATION (gender-tailored programs, equity and diversity initiatives, and systems change processes).   Brady Freitas, MSW, LCSW-C, ACHP-SW, is a clinical social worker specializing in palliative care at the University of Maryland’s Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center. He has extensive training in motivational interviewing, trauma-informed care and Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy. He provides LGBT cultural competency training for the cancer center staff and seeks to raise awareness for the importance of cancer screening amongst the Transgender population.
Published: March 25, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
The March 2020 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: The Value of Social Work | Mental Health: Brain Awareness | Prevention: Substance Use Prevention and Preventing Problem Gambling | ORN: Partnering with Schools to Impact Addiction | Region 3 Spotlight: 185aDay and Mental Health and Intimacy. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox.
Published: March 3, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
The February 2020 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Black History Month | Mental Health: Resources to Prepare Educators | Prevention: Substance Use Prevention and Stopping the Spread of HIV/AIDS | ORN: One-year Extension | Region 3 Spotlight: CLOUD. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox.
Published: February 4, 2020
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The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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