You are visiting us from Virginia. You are located in HHS Region 3. Your Center is Central East ATTC.

Products and Resources Catalog

Center
Product Type
Target Audience
Language
Keywords
Date Range
eNewsletter or Blog
Trans Awareness Week, observed from November 13—19, is an opportunity to identify and become freshly aware of the unique challenges faced by the transgender community, particularly in relation to substance use disorder. We all have a crucial role to play in understanding and addressing these challenges. Behavioral health professionals, social workers, counselors, and educators play a crucial role in creating a supportive environment for transgender individuals. By recognizing the additional layers of stress and vulnerability they face, professionals can better tailor interventions and support systems that address the underlying issues contributing to substance use. The Central East ATTC is committed to equity and inclusion for ALL. In August, we provided a training titled “Creating Safety: Welcoming Approaches for LGBTQ Clients” for Health and Human Services Region 3 in which we explored how organizations can become safe spaces for LGBTQ clients and their families. To check out a recording and/or slides of that training, click HERE. We have the power and responsibility to shape a more inclusive and empathetic workforce and society. By fostering understanding, compassion, and support, we can work together to create a world where transgender individuals are not compelled to escape their pain through substance use but are empowered to face their challenges with resilience and dignity. Let Trans Awareness Week 2023 be a stepping stone toward a more inclusive, empathetic, and supportive future for us all. To learn more about Trans Awareness Week, check out https://glaad.org/transweek.
Published: November 7, 2024
Print Media
Xylazine (or “tranq”) is a non-opioid sedative and tranquilizer only approved for use in veterinary medicine. However, over the past several years, human consumption of xylazine has begun rapidly increasing. Although initially only identified in illicit drug supplies in limited areas, xylazine has been found in 48 states as of April 2023. Xylazine is frequently, though not exclusively, used in conjunction with opioids, particularly fentanyl—due to xylazine’s ability to prolong their effects. Xylazine use presents many potential dangers to people, including an increased risk of overdose and the development of necrotizing tissue damage. This factsheet details key concerns, overdose responses, harm reduction techniques, and more.   To download the factsheet in English, please click the  "Understanding Xylazine" button on the right side of the page.   This factsheet is now available in Spanish. Translation services by the National Hispanic and Latino Behavioral Health Center of Excellence. Traducido por: To download the full version of the Spanish factsheet, please click the "Comprender la xilacina" button on the right side of the page.  
Published: March 15, 2024
Print Media
DESCRIPTION Though trauma is linked with Substance Use Disorder for people from all walks of life, LGBTQ communities experience unique sources and dynamics of trauma, as well as distinct influences and social consequences that impact the prevalence of Substance Use Disorders within the population. These may include family rejection and estrangement, increased incidence of childhood sexual abuse, identity discernment stress and faith-related shame, survivor’s guilt for those who lost dozens of friends in the early days of the AIDS epidemic, and many other special situations. This webinar will highlight some of the dimensions of trauma specific to LGBTQ individuals, substance use behaviors linked to those events, and some of the unique sites of resilience and support available within LGBTQ communities. Please use the download attachment 1 button on the right side of the page to to view the entire  English factsheet.       This factsheet is now available in Spanish. Translation services by the National Hispanic and Latino Behavioral Health Center of Excellence. Traducido por:   To download the full version of the Spanish factsheet, use the Download Attachment 2 button on the right side of the page.
Published: March 15, 2024
Print Media
The Central East ATTC is committed to fostering a positive and affirming environment that acknowledges LGBTQ identities and realities. Though nearly every care provider expresses the intention of creating a welcoming environment for LGBTQ clients, good intentions alone are not enough to maintain a practice free of prejudice, repair poor office forms and protocols, minimize microaggressions, and eradicate disrespect for the lived experiences of sexual and gender minority community members. When a member of any marginalized group enters your setting, they are scanning for potential threats, hazards, and disappointments with their care as a reflexive gesture of self-protection. This factsheet provides an overview of indicators for creating safety and engagement techniques that can help build trust and reassurance for your LGBTQ clients. Download this factsheet to learn more.   To download the factsheet in English, please use the download attachment 1 on the right side of the page. This factsheet is now available in Spanish. Translation services by the National Hispanic and Latino Behavioral Health Center of Excellence. Traducido por: To download the full version of the Spanish factsheet, use the Download Attachment 2 button on the right side of the page.  
Published: March 15, 2024
Print Media
 DESCRIPTION The COVID-19 pandemic fundamentally shifted the health and wellbeing of every human on planet Earth. LGBTQ community members were impacted early in the crisis, and continue to show disparities in contracting the virus, as well as higher rates of death, disability, substance use disorders, and suicide related to pandemic distress. These impacts were not evenly distributed across all LGBTQ people, however, but were concentrated among queer and transgender of color and gender diverse people in general. New research is emerging that points to both expected and surprising impacts of the disease unique to LGBTQ people. This webinar will explore LGBTQ population dynamics, needs, and ways to support vulnerable community members as the world population emerges into the post-COVID reality.   Please use the download attachment 1 button on the right side of the page to view the entire factsheet in English.     This factsheet is now available in Spanish. Translation services by the National Hispanic and Latino Behavioral Health Center of Excellence. Traducido por: To download the full version of the Spanish factsheet, use the Download Attachment 2 button on the right side of the page.  
Published: March 15, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
Dr. Nora Volkow is the Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health. Her research sheds light on one of the most important indicators that someone will or will not reach out for support for their substance use: stigma.[1] She states that: "The words we use to describe mental illnesses and substance use disorders (addiction to alcohol and other legal and illegal drugs) can impact the likelihood that people will seek help and the quality of the help they receive. Research indicates that stigma—negative attitudes toward people based on distinguishing characteristics—contributes in multiple ways to poorer health outcomes; consequently, it has been identified as a critical focus for research and interventions."[2] Addiction, along with mental health challenges, have long been some of the most stigmatized conditions. Countless research studies show that when there are stigmatizing attitudes, fewer people reach out for help. This is especially concerning considering the percentages of people who don’t receive the treatment they need (nearly 90% of the people who need support for their substance use challenges or addiction do not get it).[3] The Words We Use Matter How we talk about addiction and recovery matters. Not just because of the words we say, but because of the words we hear—and what our loved ones hear and in turn, can internalize. Research from 2019 shows that nearly 20% of people who needed help didn’t get it because they were concerned about what their neighbors or community would think.[4] There are things that we can do as loved ones to learn how to talk about addiction and also why this matters—and how it can help end addiction stigma. Understanding the science of addiction and recovery is a first step. You may be like me (not a neuroscientist) and that’s okay. There’s a way to understand what happens on a physical level when we experience substance use disorder or substance misuse challenges. Flo Hilliard, MSH, founding member of Faces & Voices of Recovery and expert in the field of addiction science explains it this way: "Many medical conditions, like Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular disease, are linked to not only a genetic predisposition but also to patterns or habits that can lead to "turning on" the gene for that condition. Substance use disorders often follow the same pattern, yet there is often stigma and shame attached to the normal progression of the medical condition. Understanding the basic brain science of addiction and recovery is a fundamental step in eliminating stigma and treating those suffering from this disorder as respected human beings. Research shows that with the proper treatment and support people can and do recover from addiction to alcohol and other drugs to have successful professional and personal lives." When we understand that addiction is a normal part of the human experience, it loses its ability to be framed as something requiring punitive measures. Something that causes shame. It lacks the power to divide into “us vs. them.” Addiction or substance use disorders are worthy of our understanding and compassion. There are some excellent resources out there, including ones through the ATTC network, including their Addiction Science Made Easy Series, that share information about the science of addiction and recovery so we not only understand it but understand how to talk about it. How We Talk About Addiction Recovery Matters There are simple ways that you can talk about addiction and recovery that decrease stigma. The National Institute on Drug Abuse or NIDA shares these helpful ways to talk about addiction recovery:[5],[6] Use person-first language Promote community education about addiction Share recovery stories Education programs for folks who work with those of us in or seeking recovery like doctors, nurses, treatment providers, counselors, and church leaders Here is another helpful resource from SAMHSA: Overcoming Stigma Ending Discrimination. Check out this helpful chart from NIDA: Words Matter - Terms to Use and Avoid When Talking About Addiction. Women and Addiction Stigma Stigma is even more prevalent for women, especially mothers, and women of color, and this has been known for decades.[7] It's part of why I founded and host the annual event with the SHE RECOVERS foundation that highlights and celebrates women’s recovery during Women’s History Month on International Women’s Day every year. This year, we are focusing on highlighting the next generation and why it’s important to not only share stories of recovery but also share what works in terms of recovery support services. Gathering as a global community of supporters of recovery is not only an incredible experience, it has a purpose: to help reduce the addiction recovery stigma that women face.[8] Since women, especially from under-resourced and underserved communities, experience higher levels of addiction stigma and are thus, less likely to seek support, we all must work to address this issue that impacts millions. When we share our stories of recovery in the light, it can illuminate hope for others and show that recovery is possible. When we use supportive and hope-filled language, we can be a part of eradicating the stigma and discrimination that has no place in our recovery-oriented world today. Join us this March and celebrate. For more information and to register for free visit: https://sherecovers.org/international-womens-day-2024/ Time and date don’t work for you? No problem! Register for a link to watch on demand any time or plan your own watch party.   Caroline Beidler, MSW is an author, recovery advocate, and founder of the storytelling platform Circle of Chairs. With almost 20 years in leadership within social work and ministry, she is currently a consultant with JBS International, along with the founder and host of the annual International Women’s Day Global Recovery Event presented by the SHE RECOVERS Foundation. Connect with her @carolinebeidler_official and  https://www.facebook.com/carolinebeidlermsw   [1] Volkow, N.D., Gordon, J.A. & Koob, G.F. Choosing appropriate language to reduce the stigma around mental illness and substance use disorders. Neuropsychopharmacol. 46, 2230–2232 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-021-01069-4 [2] National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Ending Discrimination Against People with Mental and Substance Use Disorders: the Evidence for Stigma Change. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2016. https://doi.org/10.17226/23442. [3] Hammarlund R, Crapanzano KA, Luce L, Mulligan L, Ward KM. Review of the effects of self-stigma and perceived social stigma on the treatment-seeking decisions of individuals with drug- and alcohol-use disorders. Subst Abus Rehabil. 2018;9:115–36. https://doi.org/10.2147/SAR.S183256. Published 2018 Nov 23. [4] Han B. Key substance use and mental health indicators in the United States: results from the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (HHS Publication No. PEP20-07-01-001, NSDUH Series H-55). Rockville, MD: Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; 2020. [5] Volkow, N.D., Gordon, J.A. & Koob, G.F. Choosing appropriate language to reduce the stigma around mental illness and substance use disorders. Neuropsychopharmacol. 46, 2230–2232 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-021-01069-4 [6] Livingston, J. D., Milne, T., Fang, M. L., & Amari, E. (2012). The effectiveness of interventions for reducing stigma related to substance use disorders: a systematic review. Addiction (Abingdon, England), 107(1), 39–50. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2011.03601.x [7] Radcliffe P. Motherhood, Pregnancy, and the Negotiation of Identity: The Moral Career of Drug Treatment. Social Science & Medicine. 2011;72:984–991. [8] Page, S., Fedorowicz, S., McCormack, F., Whitehead, S. (2024). Women, Addictions, Mental Health, Dishonesty, and Crime Stigma: Solutions to Reduce the Social Harms of Stigma. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 21(1):63. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21010063
Published: March 5, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
by Raymond Crowel, PsyD, Clinical Director, The Danya Institute  In March 2020, COVID-19 made its presence felt literally around the world. Within weeks, our lives were upended, as businesses shuttered their doors, schools closed, and our social connections were severed. The same was true for substance use and recovery programs when outpatient addiction treatment, medication-assisted treatment, and residential treatment programs closed. In the early months, both face-to-face services and AA/NA support networks were nonexistent. Successful substance use recovery requires access to treatment, connection to people, and a strong community that supports recovery. Limited access to treatment and services, paired with isolation, anxiety, and depression caused by the pandemic, proved to be devastating for many people in recovery. Relapse and overdose rates jumped in the first year of the pandemic, destroying the progress that was beginning to be made in combating the opioid abuse epidemic. In addition, many vulnerable people turned to drugs and alcohol to cope with the chronic stress, loneliness, loss of work, and grief. Lastly, the drug trade in fentanyl exploded. The result was a dramatic spike in overdoses and substance use-related emergency department visits. <em>Image by Enrique from Pixabay</em> While the COVID-19 pandemic has become less deadly, substance abuse has not. The ongoing trauma from the pandemic, untreated relapses in recovery, limited treatment capacity, and increasing potency and availability of illegal drugs contributed to more than 100,000 deaths in 2022 (NIDA). The pandemic forced substance use treatment systems to think of creative ways to continue to support recovery. Peer Recovery Specialists, trained in outreach and connecting with persons ready to begin their recovery process, shifted to disposable cell phones and virtual support services and support groups. Flexible Federal and state government policies allowed medication-assisted treatment programs to provide more walk-up and take-home dosing. The entire substance abuse and mental health service system migrated to telehealth services to provide safe access to ongoing treatment. Online networks and virtual referral processes made identifying and matching treatment providers with those seeking treatment easier.  As residential programs reopened, providers implemented masking, testing, safe distancing, and sanitation processes to protect residents and staff from COVID-19. Many such practices put into place during the height of the pandemic have remained in place, permanently altering how services are delivered.  Sadly, our rates of addiction, overdose, and death by overdose remain high. Although education, prevention, and treatment efforts are back to near pre-pandemic levels, still more needs to be done to save the lives of the many still struggling with addiction. At a minimum, we need: More treatment professionals, including Peer Recovery Specialists and credentialed foreign-trained professionals. Integrated approaches to healthcare that consider both mental health and substance, along with social determinants of health. Increased adoption of harm reduction efforts, including the widespread distribution of Naloxone, needle exchanges, and fentanyl test kits, as well as supervised consumption sites.   COVID-19’s legacy is one of suffering and rising to the challenge. We are hopeful that the enduring legacy will be a stronger system of care for behavioral health, built with the same determination brought to combatting COVID-19.
Published: January 2, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
November 2023 Dialogue: ATTC: Trans Awareness Week | MHTTC: School Well-Being Learning Community | PTTC: Fostering Inclusivity and Substance Use Prevention | ORN: Finding a Voice. Additional sections include behavioral health observances, virtual training and webinar events, and new resources. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the HHS Region 3/Central East region. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected].   Sign up to receive the Dialogue and our weekly training bulletin in your mailbox.   Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: November 7, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
September 2023 Dialogue – Addiction: Nurturing Purpose in Recovery: Unveiling Passions and Living Intentionally | MHTTC: Improving Suicide Prevention Strategies in Maryland | Prevention: National Suicide Prevention Month | ORN: Addressing Regional Needs. Additional sections include behavioral health observances, virtual training and webinar events, Region 3 news, and new publications/resources. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the HHS Region 3/Central East region. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected].   Sign up to receive the Dialogue and our weekly training bulletin in your mailbox.   Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: September 5, 2023
Multimedia
DESCRIPTION Xylazine (or “tranq”) is a non-opioid sedative and tranquilizer only approved for use in veterinary medicine. However, over the past several years, human consumption of xylazine has begun rapidly increasing. Although initially only identified in illicit drug supplies in limited areas, xylazine has been found in 48 states as of April 2023. Xylazine is frequently, though not exclusively, used in conjunction with opioids, particularly fentanyl—due to xylazine’s ability to prolong their effects. Xylazine use presents many potential dangers to people, including an increased risk of overdose and the development of necrotizing tissue damage. This webinar will bring together experts from across disciplines to discuss the history of xylazine use, what is known about its current scope of use and consequences, the effects of xylazine on people, and wound care and other harm reduction strategies. It will also offer an opportunity for participants to ask questions in a roundtable panel discussion format. OBJECTIVES Describe Xylazine and its history of use and consequences. Explain how harm reduction strategies need to be adapted for complications in Xylazine use. Describe the current trends that detail the scope and the extent of the Xylazine issue. PRESENTERS Jason Bienert, RN, CWCN Josh Esrick, MPP   DRUG ENFORCEMENT AGENCY (DEA) GUEST:  Gail Poirier, Section Chief, Strategic Intelligence Section (NIT) Jaclyn Iera, Program Manager, Office of Forensic Sciences   SAMHSA Jeanne Tuono, Assistant Regional Director (Region 3)
Published: July 25, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
July 2023 Dialogue – Addiction: We Live it Every Day (DEI) | MHTTC: Improving LGBTQIA2S+ Youth Outcomes | Prevention: National BIPOC Mental Health Month: Culture, Community, & Connection | ORN: BIPOC Communities and Families | Regional Spotlight: 2023 Syndemic Solutions Summit. Additional sections include behavioral health observances, virtual training and webinar events, Region 3 news, and new publications/resources. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the HHS Region 3/Central East region. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected].   Sign up to receive the Dialogue and our weekly training bulletin in your mailbox.   Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: July 5, 2023
Multimedia
DESCRIPTION SAMHSA Region III, in partnership with the Central East Addiction Technology Transfer Center, is hosting a 90 minute virtual interactive training event to focus on workforce recruitment and retention. The featured speakers are the same content experts from Advocates for Human Potential who developed a Recruiting and Retention Toolkit for SAMHSA. The most relevant practical principles from the toolkit that have been updated will be presented. The speakers will showcase workforce planning and implementation strategies based on their extensive experience serving states, counties, providers and stakeholders. GUEST SPEAKERS  ADVOCATES FOR HUMAN POTENTIAL WORKFORCE EXPERTS: Richard Landis, MSW Co-Director, Training and Technical Assistance Fran Basche, MA Senior Program Director Susan Lange, MEd Senior Program Manager   SAMHSA SPEAKERS: Jean Bennett, PhD SAMHSA Regional Director Larke Huang, PhD Director, Office of Behavioral Health Equity
Published: June 2, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
May 2023 Dialogue – Addiction: Deadly Impact of Fentanyl | MHTTC: Mental Health Awareness Month | Prevention: SAMHSA’s National Prevention Week: Promoting Health and Wellness | ORN: Make Possibilities a Reality | Regional Spotlight: ORN Xylazine Regional Summit. Additional sections include behavioral health observances, virtual training and webinar events, Region 3 news, and new publications/resources. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the HHS Region 3/Central East region. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected].   Sign up to receive the Dialogue and our weekly training bulletin in your mailbox.   Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: May 2, 2023
Print Media
This infographic discusses xylazine, a non-opioid animal sedative and tranquilizer, also known as "tranq," that is being used as an additive to the illicit opioid supply, particularly fentanyl. It covers key concerns including overdose risk, heart and blood pressure problems, necrotic tissue damage, treatment challenges, and harm reduction barriers. It also contains suggested actions for prevention and treatment professionals.     *Originally published April 27, 2023, revised June 5, 2023
Published: April 27, 2023
Print Media
The use of electronic vaporizing devices (“vaping”) has skyrocketed in popularity since their widespread introduction across the United States. Through these devices, consumers inhale an aerosolized liquid compound, most commonly liquid nicotine or cannabis-derived chemicals (both CBD and THC). Risks stemming from vaping present an important public health challenge, particularly for youth, but also among adults. While significant research gaps remain, a growing number of evidence-based practices are available to behavioral health practitioners.  
Published: March 21, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
Due to the length of the articles written by our authors, the March 2023 Dialogue newsletter was split into two parts. Part 1 was published March 7 and Part 2 was published March 14. Part 2 of the March newsletter contains articles: MHTTC: Celebrating Women in Medicine | Regional Spotlight: Sean's House. Additional sections include behavioral health observances and virtual training and webinar events. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the HHS Region 3/Central East region. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected].   Sign up to receive the Dialogue and our weekly training bulletin in your mailbox.   Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: March 14, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
Due to the length of the articles written by our authors, the March 2023 Dialogue newsletter was split into two parts. Part 1 was published March 7 and Part 2 was published March 14. Part 1 of the March newsletter contains articles: Addiction: Celebrating Women and their Contributions to Medicine | Prevention: From Claw Machines to Video Gaming to Sports Betting, Is it Possible to Eliminate Gambling Activities from Youth? | ORN: Adolescent Health. Additional sections include behavioral health observances, virtual training and webinar events, Region 3 news, and new resources. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the HHS Region 3/Central East region. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected].   Sign up to receive the Dialogue and our weekly training bulletin in your mailbox.   Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: March 7, 2023
Toolkit
A toolkit for behavioral health prevention and treatment providers, recovery community organizations, and individuals in recovery with practical information and tools to enhance their capacity to engage in effective stigma reduction efforts. This guide provides practical information about a variety of approaches to prevent and mitigate behavioral health-related stigma. Some approaches are straightforward and can be initiated by individuals on their own. These approaches include tips on using stigma-free, positive person-first language and writing letters to the editor. Some approaches are comprehensive, such as developing a community action group and implementing a community-based messaging and media campaign. The revision of this toolkit was made in collaboration with the Central East MHTTC and the Central East PTTC.
Published: March 3, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
The November 2022 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Multiple Pathways to Recovery | Mental Health: Coping After a Death by Suicide | Prevention: SAMHSA’s 19th Annual Prevention Day | ORN: African American History Month, and Regional Spotlight: Beyond Bars. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the HHS Region 3/Central East region. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected].   Sign up to receive the Dialogue and our weekly training bulletin in your mailbox.   Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: January 4, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
The November 2022 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Gaming Addiction | Mental Health: Helping Children Cope with Death & Grief | Prevention: Veterans and Substance Use Prevention | ORN: Native American Heritage Month, and Regional Spotlight: The Recovery Bank. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected].   Sign up to receive the Dialogue and our weekly training bulletin in your mailbox.   Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: November 1, 2022
Multimedia
Through the "One Pill Can Kill" campaign, the DEA is bringing awareness to the dangers of fentanyl, the threat of fake pills, and resources to keep people safe. The overarching goal was to provide participants with information about the "One Pill Can Kill" campaign and review a best practice communication strategy so participants felt confident in both their knowledge of the "One Pill Can Kill" campaign and in their ability to communicate it with others.   Learning Objectives Gain knowledge on the dangers of fentanyl Describe 3 key messages of the "One Pill Can Kill" awareness campaign Be familiar with resources to support the "One Pill Can Kill" campaign Review a best-practice communication strategy for sharing information Speakers Sean T. Fearns serves as the Chief of Community Outreach and Prevention Support for DEA since 2015.  In this capacity, Sean is responsible for guiding a diverse and creative staff to develop and implement strategic national partnerships with other organizations which help educate the public on the current drug threats facing the country, support the DEA field divisions, implement DEA’s Operation Engage, communicate key administration drug prevention messages, and help reduce the demand for those drugs.       Alex Waitt, MS, MSEd, LPC, is a licensed professional counselor and the Co-Project Director for the Central East ATTC where he is responsible for the programmatic and administrative coordination of all training and technical assistance for the CE ATTC Region. He is the spokesperson and liaison to stakeholders and supports the development of other training and workforce initiatives.           RESOURCES One Pill Can Kill DEA Campaign Webinar slides This webinar was provided by the Central East ATTC. The Central East ATTC is funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and managed by the Danya Institute.
Published: September 13, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The September 2022 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction:  Families in Recovery | Mental Health:  National Suicide Prevention Month | Prevention:  Suicide Prevention Awareness | ORN:  Mobilize Recovery, and Regional Spotlight: A Journey to Recovery, by Demetrie Garner. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected].   Sign up to receive the Dialogue and our weekly training bulletin in your mailbox.   Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: September 6, 2022
Print Media
The term “Gender Diverse” encompasses a broad universe of gender identities and expressions. “Transgender” is often used as an umbrella term for the community, though not all gender expansive individuals consider themselves to be Transgender. Other terms in common use include Nonbinary, 2Spirit (used by Indigenous people only) Enby, Genderqueer, Gender Fluid, Agender, and Pangender, among many others. This infographic factsheet provides statistics and prevalence of SUD diagnoses among U.S. Transgender and Cisgender adults, risk factors, steps organizations can take to be welcoming to gender diverse individuals, and recommendations for treatment programs.
Published: July 22, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The July 2022 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Construction Work and Opioids | Mental Health: Mental Health in the BIPOC Community | Prevention: BIPOC Mental Health Month | ORN: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. Additional sections include behavioral health observances, virtual training and webinar events, Region 3 news, new resources, and Regional Spotlight: PPW Addiction Treatment Center – Claymont Center for Pregnant & Parenting Women. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected]. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox. Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: July 12, 2022
1 2 3 4

The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

map-markermagnifiercrossmenuchevron-down