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Products and Resources Catalog

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Online Course, Website
In 2019, an estimated 1 in 59 adults in the U.S. was under community supervision. Researchers estimate that 60 to 80% of individuals on probation have a substance use disorder. Many people on community supervision who have an opioid use disorder never get the high-quality care needed to recover. There are many reasons for this - logistical barriers, lack of access to evidence-based treatments, stigma... But as a professional working with people on probation/ parole, you can change that. This learning series is designed specifically for community supervision officers and community treatment providers working with justice-involved individuals. Whether you're supervising someone with an OUD under community supervision or providing their treatment, every interaction is an opportunity to achieve better outcomes. This course consists of six modules. The resources and videos throughout this course: Provide probation officers and community treatment providers with the knowledge, tools, and resources to respond to the treatment needs of individuals under supervision, and Improve access and linkage to evidence-based treatment in the community for individuals with opioid use disorders who are under supervision. It is important for probation officers and community providers to review all modules in order to align role clarity and expectations. Please note that you will see the following acronyms used throughout this course: PO - Probation Officer CP - Community Provider SUD - Substance Use Disorder MOUD - Medications for Opioid Use Disorder Access this course here.  
Published: July 1, 2024
Other
The attached practitioner-friendly report highlights findings from a national scan of probation and parole offices and staff was developed by New England ATTC Director, Rosemarie Martin, and the New England Region Opioid Response Network team in partnership with the American Correctional Association. Findings outlined in the attached report directly impacted the development of the HealtheKnowledge eLearning course, “Improving Outcomes for Individuals on Community-based Supervision with Opioid Use Disorders (OUD)” designed specifically for community supervision professionals and providers working with individuals with opioid and substance use under community supervision.
Published: July 1, 2024
Website
The New England ATTC, in partnership with the IAMSBIRT Study (Implementing Alcohol Misuse SBIRT), has created a suite of SBIRT training and technical assistance resources for pediatric trauma center staff. Resources include separate webinars about screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment, motivational interviewing in adolescents, and IAMSBIRT oversight. In addition, there are worksheets in English and Spanish about safe administration and disposal of opioids, and materials to monitor SBIRT fidelity. Resources can be found here: https://sites.brown.edu/iamsbirt/previous-cohorts/
Published: June 28, 2024
Website
The New England ATTC, in partnership with Project MIMIC (Maximizing Implementation of Motivational Incentives in Clinics), has created a suite of contingency management training and technical assistance resources. The resources are broadly applicable, though likely to be especially relevant to opioid treatment programs. Specific resources include an overview of contingency management resources, an example contingency management session, a demonstration of how to track contingency management fidelity, and a discussion of how to design a contingency management protocol. Resources can be found here: https://sites.brown.edu/projectmimic/training-materials/
Published: June 21, 2024
Website
The New England ATTC Co-Director, Dr. Sara Becker, has a Commentary out in Addiction titled, “Contingency Management Needs Implementation Science.”  Dr. Becker was invited to contribute this commentary in recognition of her – and by extension the New England ATTC’s - reputation as a national leader in efforts to increase access to contingency management in specialty addiction treatment settings. This commentary asserts that efforts to increase access to contingency management must be informed by rigorous methods of implementation science. Click here for access to the full text. 
Published: June 17, 2024
Other
The JCOIN Steering Committee met June 11th - June 13th. Attached is a poster that was presented to the committee. Objectives: Engage key stakeholders to identify target concepts for education/training for community supervision professionals (CSPs) Develop a brief, digestible, evidence-based toolkit for CSPs focused on OUD and medications to treat OUD (MOUD) Provide a sustainable training and workforce development tool for CSPs to better serve clients with OUD
Published: June 13, 2024
Presentation Slides
The New England ATTC, in partnership with AdCare Educational Institute of New England, hosted this session at the New England Summer School of Addiction Studies with subject matter expert Michele Stewart-Copes. This presentation explored the impact of structural racism and  intergenerational trauma on BIPOC and special populations, including  pregnant women with opioid/substance use addiction. A copy of the presentation slides is available for download.
Published: June 11, 2024
Toolkit
The New England ATTC, in partnership with AdCare Educational Institute of New England hosted this session at the New England Summer School  with subject matter expert Brenda Westberry. Copies of the materials from this session are available for download.
Published: June 10, 2024
Other
The New England ATTC held a Regional Advisory Board Meeting on 6/7/24 to share highlights over the reporting period and identify emergent areas of needs. Priority topics included advancing harm reduction throughout New England. The meeting minutes are available for download.
Published: June 7, 2024
Other
The New England ATTC, in partnership with RICARES, held the next monthly installment of the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction Reading Group series. We discussed a paper titled,“The State of the Research on Opioid Outcomes Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Other Sexuality- and Gender-Diverse Populations: A Scoping Review” by Paschen Wolff and colleagues. A summary of the discussion is available for download. Article link:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/11Z2D4vd6vjU6xv7NTFYR85KmrmT1M73f/view
Published: May 18, 2024
Other
The New England ATTC, in partnership with RICARES, held the next monthly installment of the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction Reading Group series. We discussed a paper titled, “Makeshift medicine is a response to US health system failures,” by Kelly and colleagues. A summary of the discussion is available for download. Article link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1YuIJ6aC9724GiD7_Umcu8QB5aY3Q5xLM/view
Published: April 20, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
Third & Fourth Quarter Updates: April 2023 - September 2023 The goals of this newsletter are to share Regional Best Practices with regard to training and technical assistance (TA) initiatives, provide updates on regional strategic initiatives and curriculum development, and facilitate ongoing collaboration among state partners and programs. Please click here to view our collaborators over the prior reporting period. View the Newsletter!
Published: March 31, 2024
Other
The New England ATTC, in partnership with RICARES, held the next monthly installment of the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction Reading Group series. We discussed a paper titled, “State-level homelessness and drug overdose mortality: Evidence from US panel data” by Cano and Oh. A summary of the discussion is available for download. Article link: www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0376871623011481?ref=pdf_download&fr=RR-2&rr=85fb4e876ef442b5 Please find the meeting summary here: ATTC ReadingGroup 03212024 Summary
Published: March 22, 2024
Presentation Slides
The New England ATTC, in partnership with the New England Association of Recovery Court Professionals, provided a basic/universal TA webinar titled, "Myth Busters - Dispelling Drug Testing Myths" with subject matter expert Paul Cary. The slides are available for download.
Published: March 16, 2024
Other
The New England ATTC, in partnership with RICARES, held the next monthly installment of the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction Reading Group series. We discussed a paper titled, “Hospitalizations for Alcohol and Opioid Use Disorders in Older Adults: Trends, Comorbidities, and Differences by Gender, Race, and Ethnicity,” by Acevedo and colleagues. A summary of the discussion is available for download. Article link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/epub/10.1177/11782218221116733 Please find the the meeting summary here: ATTC ReadingGroup 02222024 Summary
Published: February 23, 2024
Presentation Slides
In partnership with the New England Association of Recovery Court Professionals, the New England ATTC hosted a webinar titled, “Peer Support: Why Your Program Needs It” by subject matter expert Abby Frutchey. The slides are available for download.
Published: February 5, 2024
Multimedia
The audio recording from the webinar, “Peer Support: Why Your Program Needs It” (described above) is also available for download.
Published: February 1, 2024
Toolkit
New England ATTC Senior Trainer, Haner Hernandez, PhD, served on the development team for SAMHSA’s National Model Standards for Peer Support Certification. This Spanish version of the national model standards was prepared in response to President Biden's 2022 Unity Agenda and outlines model standards for substance use disorder, mental health, and family/youth peer support certification. The entire toolkit is available for download.
Published: November 30, 2023
Other
The New England ATTC, in partnership with RICARES, held the next monthly installment of the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction Reading Group series. We discussed a paper titled, “Predictors of Retention and Drug Use Among Patients With Opioid Use Disorder Transferred to a Specialty "Second Chance" Methadone Program” by Moses and colleagues. A summary of the discussion is available for download.
Published: November 30, 2023
Other
The New England ATTC, in partnership with RICARES, held the next monthly installment of the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction Reading Group series. We discussed a paper titled, “Mobile low-threshold buprenorphine integrated with infectious disease services” by Rosecrans and colleagues. A summary of the discussion is available for download.
Published: October 31, 2023
Multimedia
The New England ATTC, in partnership with the New England Association of Recovery Court Professionals, provided a basic/universal TA webinar titled, "How to Best Treat and Manage Methamphetamine Use" with subject matter experts Brian Meyer and Helen Harberts. The recording is available for download.
Published: October 4, 2023
Presentation Slides
The presentation slides from “How to Best Treat and Manage Methamphetamine Use” (described above) are also available for download.
Published: October 4, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
Third & Fourth Quarter Updates The goals of this newsletter are to share Regional Best Practices with regard to training and technical assistance (TA) initiatives, provide updates on regional strategic initiatives and curriculum development, and facilitate ongoing collaboration among state partners and programs. Please click here to view our collaborators over the prior reporting period. View the Newsletter!
Published: September 30, 2023
Presentation Slides
This presentation titled, "Addiction Technology Transfer: Bridging the Gap Between Science and Service for 30 Years" provides participants with an overview of the New England ATTC and key accomplishments over the past three decades.
Published: September 22, 2023
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The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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