You are visiting us from Virginia. You are located in HHS Region 3. Your Center is Central East ATTC.

Products and Resources Catalog

Center
Product Type
Target Audience
Language
Keywords
Date Range
Multimedia
This webinar, hosted by the Northwest ATTC, PTTC, and MHTTC, provided an overview of the seven vital conditions for well-being and illustrated how the framework can be useful for conceptualizing holistic individual and community well-being.  The presenters, Chris Kelleher (consultant) and Jennifer Johnson (Skagit County Deputy County Administrator), demonstrated how the framework can help address issues related to a community response to mental health and well-being, substance use disorder, and substance misuse prevention in Skagit County, WA, with the North Star Initiative. The framework is used by multiple state and federal agencies, including The Federal Plan for Equitable Long-Term Recovery and Resilience as a guiding framework to organize and take action on social determinants of health. Watch the recording here.  
Published: February 20, 2024
Multimedia
The audio recording from the webinar, “Peer Support: Why Your Program Needs It” (described above) is also available for download.
Published: February 1, 2024
Interactive Resource
  The South Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center (SSW ATTC) collaborates with Faith Partners, Inc. a non-profit 501©3, which was founded in 1995 by religious leaders seeking ways to mobilize faith communities’ resources to address alcohol and drug issues in their communities. Faith Partners provides the leadership, training, educational materials and consultation to initiate, develop and sustain a faith communities’ efforts to address drugs and alcohol and its impact on their members. Faith Partners provides an individualized plan to start an effective team effort to address the needs of the whole faith community. As part of the process of building capacity and identifying the unique needs and goals of each faith community around the development of their ministry, Faith Partners utilizes community surveys at several points in time. Following is a practical guide developed by the South Southwest ATTC with best practices for engaging the entire faith community in the survey process.
Published: December 18, 2023
Multimedia
CRTIC: Pour a Cup of Tea and Sit With It    Episode 4, with Erika Holliday and Lauren Ragan Wilkerson   This episode features Erika Holliday, Substance Use Coordinator for the Unified Government (Kansas City, KS) Public Health Department, and Lauren Ragan Wilkerson, Board-Certified Music Therapist at the University of California-San Francisco Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland. In this conversation, we challenged ourselves with questions that rarely have clear answers, and our guests offered both macro- and micro-level strategies for effecting change and maintaining well-being through it.  
Published: May 5, 2023
Multimedia
This presentation reviewed the philosophy of harm reduction as an intervention for substance use disorder and will examine the trajectory of harm reduction programming in Idaho since the legalization of syringe services in 2019.  A few learning objectives:  Be able to identify multiple forms of harm reduction as it pertains to a variety of potentially risky behaviors. Be able to reframe substance use from a harm reduction model. Be able to identify the benefits of a syringe service program and other harm reduction interventions to an individual and a community. Increase knowledge about the implementation and growth of harm reduction programs in Idaho. About the presenter: Marjorie Wilson, LMSW, MPH, is the Executive Director and co-founder of Idaho Harm Reduction Project (IHRP). IHRP is a drug user health program offering a syringe service program, naloxone distribution program, and HIV/HCV testing. Since 2019, IHRP has served the whole state through its mail-based services and has distributed supplies into all of Idaho's 44 counties. Download slides | Watch recording
Published: October 24, 2022
Multimedia
This is part 2 of the Northwest ATTC's 3-part summer webinar series: Innovative and Successful Approaches to Staff Recruitment and Retention. Find information on all 3 parts here. The current behavioral health workforce emergency is nothing new in the culturally and linguistically specific communities in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest. Traditional recruitment strategies by dominant culture organizations often fail due to a variety of systemic and cultural barriers that are largely invisible to the established behavioral health systems. Executive Director Fernando Peña with NW Instituto Latino operates a culturally specific SUD Recovery Community Organization that despite the ongoing behavioral health workforce emergency is fully staffed with culturally and linguistically specific staff and routinely has multiple applicants for each open position as one becomes available. In this session, Fernando shared his understanding of the systemic barriers that impact Latinx communities when it comes to the behavioral health workforce as well as some strategies he has used to recruit, retain and support their respective teams. Watch recording (no slides were presented with this session)
Published: September 1, 2022
Print Media
The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on January 20, 2022 from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM. This discussion reviewed the article, “Interaction and conflict between outreach workers and research officers in implementing collaborative action research in the field of harm reduction: a qualitative study.”  View the January 2022 RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: January 20, 2022
Print Media
The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on October 21, 2021 from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM. This discussion reviewed the article, “We are the researched, the researchers, and the discounted: The experiences of drug user activists as researchers.”  View the October 2021 RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: October 21, 2021
Multimedia
  This event took place virtually on Tuesday, October 5th, 2021 from 1:00 PM to 2:30 PM (ET).    The New England ATTC hosted the inaugural SAMHSA Region 1 Diversity Inclusion Project Showcase (DIPS): Promoting Recovery-Oriented Organizations! This showcase was introduced by Assistant Regional Administrator Taylor Bryan Turner, with remarks by national and state leaders Tom Coderre, Deidre Calvert, and Nancy Navaretta. Moderators Dr. Haner Hernandez, Michele Stewart-Copes, and Daryl McGraw introduced four recovery-oriented community-based organizations that serve historically marginalized communities: Recovery Support Services; New Life II Ministries; Stairway to Recovery; and STEPRox Recovery Support Center. Learn more about the showcase here. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________   The video recording of this session may be accessed by clicking on the "view resource" button above. Please click here to access the event agenda and here to access each community-based organization's presentation slides, which shared their organization’s mission statement, services, successes, challenges, and contact information.    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________   For more information about the history of the DIPS initiative, please contact SAMHSA's Public Health Fellow Tim Jean at [email protected].    
Published: October 7, 2021
Presentation Slides
  This event took place virtually on Tuesday, October 5th, 2021 from 1:00 PM to 2:30 PM (ET).    The New England ATTC hosted the inaugural SAMHSA Region 1 Diversity Inclusion Project Showcase (DIPS): Promoting Recovery-Oriented Organizations! This showcase was introduced by Assistant Regional Administrator Taylor Bryan Turner, with remarks by national and state leaders Tom Coderre, Deidre Calvert, and Nancy Navaretta. Moderators Dr. Haner Hernandez, Michele Stewart-Copes, and Daryl McGraw introduced four recovery-oriented community-based organizations that serve historically marginalized communities: Recovery Support Services; New Life II Ministries; Stairway to Recovery; and STEPRox Recovery Support Center. Learn more about the showcase here. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________   The event agenda and each community-based organization's presentation slides of this session may be accessed by clicking on the "view resource" button above. Please click here to access the showcase recording.   ________________________________________________________________________________________________________   For more information about the history of the DIPS initiative, please contact SAMHSA's Public Health Fellow Tim Jean at [email protected].    
Published: October 6, 2021
Multimedia
Presenter: Jenna van Draanen, PhD, MPH, University of Washington July 2021 This one-hour webinar discussed the role of harm reduction in addiction treatment and how it fits with other systems of care. In addition to covering recent service use patterns in the Northwest, Dr. van Draanen shared evidence and lessons learned from her work with overdose prevention sites (a model of peer-run safe consumption sites) in Vancouver, Canada. The session covered changes in overdose prevention site utilization during COVID-19, the importance of peer involvement in service delivery, and outcomes associated with overdose prevention site utilization. Download slides
Published: July 29, 2021
Multimedia
      This virtual presentation is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will focus on the reasons addiction is considered a disease, challenge some of the ideas about substance use disorders that are prevalent in many faith communities, and also honor some of the many wonderful, effective ways that faith communities can help individuals on their path towards recovery in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina. Treatment providers, peer support communities, and community-based organizations in Region 4 are encouraged to register for free.   1.    Verbalize the prevalence of substance use disorders in the general United States population,  2.    Identify four criteria of any disease, 3.    Articulate two reasons choice and will power alone are not an effective strategy for recovery, 4.    Describe two ways faith communities can help support recovery. ======================================     James E. Campbell, LPC, LAC, MAC, CACII has worked professionally in the human services field for over twenty-five years in a wide range of clinical settings, currently serving as the Training and Technical Assistance Manager for Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center.  His passion is helping individuals and families heal and build on the strengths they possess.  He’s a member of both NAADAC and ACA and is a past president of APSC/SCAADAC.  James is a nationally recognized, author and speaker. 
Published: February 24, 2021
Multimedia
    S2 E4 | Addiction Equity X Policy Progression In this episode, we focus our attention on recognizing the 10th anniversary of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA) and the Kennedy-Satcher Center for Mental Health Equity in the Satcher Health Leadership Institute at Morehouse School of Medicine. The collaboration jointly released “Evaluating State Mental Health and Addiction Parity Statutes,” with 32 states receiving a failing grade for statues designed to ensure equal access to mental health and addiction treatment. We spoke to Megan on the next steps, broke down some jargon, and defined the basics of Addiction Equity. We promote and raise awareness on how to be involved in the addiction community to garner policy change in the Southeast.  Resources:  Evaluating State Mental Health and Addiction Parity Statutes: A Technical Report The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act YelloPain - My Vote Don't Count (A civics lesson via hip hop song)       Megan Douglas, JD is the Director of Health Policy for the National Center for Primary Care (NCPC) and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Community Health and Preventive Medicine at Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) in Atlanta, GA. Megan is a licensed attorney whose research focuses on studying how laws and policies can be used to improve health and eliminate health disparities. She has expertise in health information technology, Medicaid, primary care, behavioral health, and health equity. Megan is also the course director for the Health Policy and Advocacy rotation, offered to MSM medical students and residents, which teaches them about the policymaking process and ways to leverage clinical experience to inform policy.  Megan received her law degree from Georgia State University (GSU) College of Law, where she interned with the Supreme Court of Georgia, the Georgia Hospital Association, and the Health Law Partnership (HeLP), a medical-legal partnership assisting low-income patients of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta with legal needs that impacted their health. After graduation, Megan became a joint fellow with the Satcher Health Leadership Institute’s Health Policy Leadership Fellowship program at MSM and the Georgia Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disorders (LEND) program at GSU. Megan serves on the Advisory Council for HeLP and the Community Advisory Council for the Center for Leadership in Disability at GSU.    
Published: January 26, 2021
Multimedia
          This virtual dialogue is sponsored by the Southeast ATTC Regional Center and will focus on how partnerships between primary care and behavioral health and comprehensive strategy can lead to health equity in underserved communities that are experiencing SUDs in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina.     Dominic Mack is a Professor of Family Medicine at Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) and serves as Director of the National Center for Primary Care (NCPC). Dr. Mack provides oversight of NCPC’s portfolio of big data health equity, health services, and HIT research. He leads the promotion of health equity through research, training, and application of innovative technology solutions that advance primary care systems to improve population health. He is founding director of the Georgia Health Information Technology Center (GA-HITEC) and Georgia Health Connect (GaHC) health information exchange and also directs Health Policy within the NIH Transdisciplinary Collaborative Center at MSM. Dr. Mack spent over 20 years practicing medicine and providing medical leadership in metropolitan Atlanta with many years of service in the Federally Qualified Health Center system. He works to develop national partnerships in rural and urban communities and takes a team-based approach to implement and sustaining community-based interventions for better outcomes. Current programs focus on progressing collaborative partnerships across communities to impact Diabetes and Substance Abuse outcomes. He is the founder and past president of Mack Medical Consultants, a for-profit company dedicated to the improvement of business practices in medical organizations.
Published: December 3, 2020
Multimedia
At the New England ATTC Advisory Board Meeting, guest speaker Lisa Sockabasin, Director of Program & External Affairs at Wabanaki Public Health, presented an inspirational look into the Wabanaki Tribe. Lisa discussed the plans to build two indigenous wellness centers in Main to serve the indigenous population made up of four tribes in the most rural areas in Maine that would connect the population with their culture to support their recovery efforts while integrating their culture and language that is just as important to them as their connection to nature and outdoors.
Published: October 5, 2020
Multimedia
Hosted by Great Lakes, Mid America, Northwest and South Southwest ATTCs. August 20, 2020. A conversation with Precia Stuby, Executive Director of the Hancock County Board of Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services. Part 5 of a discussion series drawing on the experiences of multiple recovery communities to provide models for how successful community-based recovery programs can be fostered and sustained in times of change.
Published: September 9, 2020
Multimedia
Hosted by Great Lakes, Mid America, Northwest and South Southwest ATTCs. July 23 2020. A conversation with Colin Cash, from the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe in Minnesota and founder of the Sober Squad Recovery Movement. Part 1 of a discussion series drawing on the experiences of multiple recovery communities to provide models for how successful community-based recovery programs can be fostered and sustained in times of change.
Published: September 9, 2020
Multimedia
Hosted by Great Lakes, Mid America, Northwest and South Southwest ATTCs. July 30, 2020. A conversation with Ruby Takushi, PhD, Director of Programs for the Recovery Café in Seattle, Washington. Part 2 of a discussion series drawing on the experiences of multiple recovery communities to provide models for how successful community-based recovery programs can be fostered and sustained in times of change.
Published: September 9, 2020
Multimedia
Hosted by Great Lakes, Mid America, Northwest and South Southwest ATTCs. August 6, 2020. A conversation with Andre Johnson President and CEO of the Detroit Recovery Project. Part 3 of a discussion series drawing on the experiences of multiple recovery communities to provide models for how successful community-based recovery programs can be fostered and sustained in times of change.
Published: September 9, 2020
Multimedia
Hosted by Great Lakes, Mid America, Northwest and South Southwest ATTCs. August 13, 2020. A conversation with Callan Howton, Director of the National Peer-Run Training and TA Center for Addiction Recovery Peer Support. Part 4 of a discussion series drawing on the experiences of multiple recovery communities to provide models for how successful community-based recovery programs can be fostered and sustained in times of change.
Published: September 9, 2020
Multimedia
Hosted by Great Lakes, Mid America, Northwest and South Southwest ATTCs. August 27, 2020. Part 6 of a discussion series drawing on the experiences of multiple recovery communities to provide models for how successful community-based recovery programs can be fostered and sustained in times of change. Series speakers join together for a final panel discussion.
Published: September 9, 2020
Interactive Resource
    A little about the product:  The investigator, co-author Dawn Tyus, sought to learn about the realities, needs, strengths, and challenges of African American women in treatment and recovery. And she did it by asking women in long-term recovery about their own experiences and observations in treatment and early recovery, and about the wisdom they had earned through the years. Those interviews yielded a wealth of knowledge, experience, and ideas for treatment and recovery support. They will form the backbone of a collection of guidelines for treatment and peer-based recovery support for African American women, to be published this year (2020) by the Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center (Southeast ATTC) at Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta. But first, this article introduces eleven extraordinary women and some of their early treatment and recovery experiences and lessons
Published: June 26, 2020
Multimedia
Julia Alexander, co-director of the Great Lakes PTTC,  shares her experience as a person in long-term recovery along with recommendations on starting a recovery community organization (RCO).   
Published: June 3, 2020
Curriculum Package
Staying in Touch: Using Caring Contacts to Sustain Connections with Your Clients is an online curriculum that describes a low-threshold, Caring Contacts intervention designed to help providers reduce client self-harm, increase feelings of self-efficacy, and fill treatment gaps due to health disparities or other challenges. A Caring Contact is a personalized written form of practitioner outreach to individual clients that expresses care and concern for their wellbeing. This simple, customizable intervention can be implemented at a distance during times of stress and isolation, making it a particularly useful addition to telehealth practices. This curriculum: is self-paced, with expected completion time of less than an hour; outlines the scientific support for this approach to reduce client isolation and potential self-harm; focuses, in part, on special circumstances and populations that can be hard to engage and retain in care; and includes concrete examples of Caring Contacts, as well as modifiable templates that can be downloaded and adapted for any organization’s use.   Additional Resources Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SAMHSA). Features information, tools, training, and more. CAMS-Care: Preventing Suicide. Training and certification for the CAMS suicide prevention assessment, intervention and treatment.  Now Matters Now (American Foundation for Suicide Prevention). Personal stories and research-based ways (DBT, e.g.) for managing suicidal thoughts and emotions.   
Published: June 2, 2020
1 2 3 4

The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

map-markermagnifiercrossmenuchevron-down