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Multimedia
  While men’s addiction and mental health treatment has been quite successful, there is great room for improvement. This new framework, developed by Mr. Griffin and colleagues, integrates the latest thinking on addiction and recovery, relational cultural theory, male psychological development, and trauma. Current treatment models and theories fail to adequately consider the relational needs of men; often omit a clear understanding of the impact of the socialization process on men; fall short of adequately addressing the impact of abuse and trauma that is so strongly linked with addiction and the life of the male addict; and often ignore any social context and/or the consequences of political, social, and economic power.     TRAINER:   Dan Griffin, MA, is an internationally recognized author, thought leader, and expert on men’s relationships and masculinity. Dan has dedicated his life and work to exploring and redefining what it means to be a man in the 21st century. He is committed to helping men be better men by understanding the impact of the Man Rules on their lives. Dan also helps men find the success in their personal lives they are striving for in their professional ones. Griffin’s books and curricula are all focused on helping men and dads live their best lives. Dan served as a senior fellow at The Meadows, world-renowned experts treating addictive disorders and trauma, from 2015 to 2017. Dan earned a Master’s degree in Sociology from the University of Kansas. For his graduate work, Dan completed the first qualitative study centered on the social construction of masculinity in the culture of Alcoholics Anonymous. Dan is in long-term recovery and lives with his family in Los Angeles   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: March 29, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The June 2023 issue honors National Pride Month, National PTSD Awareness Month, and Men's Health Month by sharing events and resources on these topics. As always, you will find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!  
Published: June 5, 2023
Multimedia
Click Here to Download Webinar Handouts  Translations Spanish Portuguese   Webinar Handouts Spanish Portuguese This was Part 1 of a 3-Session Virtual Learning Community. This series on Understanding, Going Through, and Managing Loss, Grief, and Bereavement takes a critical look at how Latino men manage and go through loss, grief, and bereavement during this Covid-19 pandemic. Learning Objectives: Understand the overall impact of loss and differentiate between grief and bereavement Describe the pandemic in regard to the type of deaths (unattended, for example), social changes, the sheer volume, and displacement (new roles imposed on people due to loss) Understand the specific ways that Latino men are affected by death and loss in the context of cultural expectations that they must be strong and evaluate their own (or loved ones) behavior in this regard Having a different perspective on the “the fear of death” Integrate the possibility that Latino men can apply lessons from understanding their own grief journeys in order to play a proactive role (and find heroic meaning) by becoming grief leaders for their families, loved ones, friends, and society at large. Draw from the information given, options to identifying their personal losses and identify options on how to manage their experience.   About the Presenter: Elizabeth Robles, LPC, CT, EOLD Elizabeth Robles works in the El Paso region as a behavioral health care professional specializing in life changes, trauma, grief, and loss. Elizabeth is Certified in Thanatology: Death, Dying & Bereavement through the Association of Death Education Counseling (ADEC). Her treatment approach offers patients the hope and strategies to facilitate continuous emotional renewal in the face of life’s constant changes. In addition to her private practice, Elizabeth serves as Clinical Director for the MYC Institute of Integrative Health, an El Paso nonprofit organization which advocates for body/mind/spirit approaches to wellbeing. In 2020, Elizabeth became a Certified End of Life Doula.
Published: August 11, 2022
Multimedia
Click Here to Download Webinar Handouts This was Part 2 of a 3-Session Virtual Learning Community. This series on Understanding, Going Through, and Managing Loss, Grief, and Bereavement takes a critical look at how Latino men manage and go through loss, grief, and bereavement during this Covid-19 pandemic. Learning Objectives: Understand the overall impact of loss and differentiate between grief and bereavement Describe the pandemic in regard to the type of deaths (unattended, for example), social changes, the sheer volume, and displacement (new roles imposed on people due to loss) Understand the specific ways that Latino men are affected by death and loss in the context of cultural expectations that they must be strong and evaluate their own (or loved ones) behavior in this regard Having a different perspective on the “the fear of death” Integrate the possibility that Latino men can apply lessons from understanding their own grief journeys in order to play a proactive role (and find heroic meaning) by becoming grief leaders for their families, loved ones, friends, and society at large. Draw from the information given, options to identifying their personal losses and identify options on how to manage their experience.   Additional Resources Spanish Translation Portuguese Translation About the Presenter: Elizabeth Robles, LPC, CT, EOLD Elizabeth Robles works in the El Paso region as a behavioral health care professional specializing in life changes, trauma, grief, and loss. Elizabeth is Certified in Thanatology: Death, Dying & Bereavement through the Association of Death Education Counseling (ADEC). Her treatment approach offers patients the hope and strategies to facilitate continuous emotional renewal in the face of life’s constant changes. In addition to her private practice, Elizabeth serves as Clinical Director for the MYC Institute of Integrative Health, an El Paso nonprofit organization which advocates for body/mind/spirit approaches to wellbeing. In 2020, Elizabeth became a Certified End of Life Doula.
Published: August 11, 2022
Multimedia
Click Here to Download Webinar Handouts This was Part 3 of a 3-Session Virtual Learning Community. This series on Understanding, Going Through, and Managing Loss, Grief, and Bereavement takes a critical look at how Latino men manage and go through loss, grief, and bereavement during this Covid-19 pandemic. Learning Objectives: Understand the overall impact of loss and differentiate between grief and bereavement Describe the pandemic in regard to the type of deaths (unattended, for example), social changes, the sheer volume, and displacement (new roles imposed on people due to loss) Understand the specific ways that Latino men are affected by death and loss in the context of cultural expectations that they must be strong and evaluate their own (or loved ones) behavior in this regard Having a different perspective on the “the fear of death” Integrate the possibility that Latino men can apply lessons from understanding their own grief journeys in order to play a proactive role (and find heroic meaning) by becoming grief leaders for their families, loved ones, friends, and society at large. Draw from the information given, options to identifying their personal losses and identify options on how to manage their experience.   Additional Resources Spanish Translation Portuguese Translation About the Presenter: Elizabeth Robles, LPC, CT, EOLD Elizabeth Robles works in the El Paso region as a behavioral health care professional specializing in life changes, trauma, grief, and loss. Elizabeth is Certified in Thanatology: Death, Dying & Bereavement through the Association of Death Education Counseling (ADEC). Her treatment approach offers patients the hope and strategies to facilitate continuous emotional renewal in the face of life’s constant changes. In addition to her private practice, Elizabeth serves as Clinical Director for the MYC Institute of Integrative Health, an El Paso nonprofit organization which advocates for body/mind/spirit approaches to wellbeing. In 2020, Elizabeth became a Certified End of Life Doula.
Published: August 11, 2022
Print Media
  The National Hispanic and Latino ATTC and PTTC are proud to share this infographic, bringing awareness to Men's Health Month. Please take a look on this information that was carefully prepared by our centers and learn more about Hispanic Men's Health And Hispanic Men's Mental Health, the challenges, the strengths, risk and protective factors, cultural considerations, tips to live healthier and longer lives and several resources. We encourage you to share with your family, friends and colleagues. Thank you! Español Los Centros Nacionales Hispanos y Latinos ATTC y PTTC se enorgullecen de compartir esta infografía, creando conciencia sobre el Mes de la Salud del Hombre. Por favor lea esta información que fue preparada cuidadosamente por nuestros centros y aprenda más sobre la Salud de los Hombres Hispanos y la Salud Mental de los Hombres Hispanos, los desafíos, las fortalezas, los factores de riesgo y de protección, las consideraciones culturales, los consejos para vivir una vida más larga y saludable y varios recursos. Te animamos a compartir con tu familia, amigos y compañeros. ¡Gracias! Português Os Centros Nacionais Hispânico-Latino ATTC e PTTC têm o orgulho de compartilhar este infográfico, trazendo conscientização sobre o Mês da Saúde do Homem. Por favor, dê uma olhada nestas informações que foram cuidadosamente preparadas pelos nossos centros e saiba mais sobre Saúde do Homem Hispânico e Saúde Mental do Homem Hispânico, os desafios, pontos fortes, fatores de risco e proteção, considerações culturais, dicas para viver uma vida mais saudável mais longa e vários recursos. Nós encorajamos você a compartilhar com sua família, amigos e colegas.
Published: June 30, 2022
Multimedia
3-Session Virtual Learning Community Session 2 Please join us for our Detoxifying Machismo series that takes a critical look at how Latino fathers have often been ignored, forgotten and even vilified by behavioral health professionals and the system of care. Explore intersections of stigma/culturally relevant healing, care provision in mental health and substance use disorder, and in developing care for Latino fathers. Our three panelists and moderator will provide their personal and professional perspectives as Latino fathers working in behavioral health care providing fields. Participants will be engaged in meaningful dialogue on this dynamic topic and will leave the series with practical tools to implement culturally and linguistically appropriate standards in their behavioral health delivery services to better engage with, recruit and retain Latino males and fathers in their programs. Learning Objectives: Uncover and Address Myths about Latino Fathers. Address the Machismo Stigma: Unpacking then rebalancing how current narratives negative impact perceptions of Latino father. Present and Discuss Models for Care and Support of Latino Fathers/Latino Men Understand the bi-directional impact machismo has had on access to and perception of behavioral health service delivery. Pierluigi Mancini, PhD, MAC - Moderator Project Director for the National Hispanic and Latino Addiction Technology Transfer Center and the National Hispanic and Latino Prevention Technology Transfer Center. Roberto Gurza, LMFT - Panelist Over a 40-yr career, has worked as a public and nonprofit leader, focused on the individual, organizational, and systemic factors involved in the delivery of culturally and linguistically relevant care to un- and under-served communities. Juan Escobedo, MA - Panelist Experienced in strategic planning, program development, evaluation, implementation, and consultation for numerous agency initiatives, committees, and non-profits in the public sector. Currently a program officer working for Caring for Denver Foundation improving the mental health and substance misuse needs of all residents of the City and County of Denver. Brian Serna, LPCC, LADAC - Panelist CEO/Founder of Serna Solutions and a trainer and consultant in behavioral health issues related to Evidence Based Practices, Cultural Considerations and Ethical Issues. He is also the Director of the Addictions, Abuse and Recovery Certificate at Southwestern College in Santa Fe, NM and the current President of NAADAC New Mexico.
Published: June 24, 2021
Print Media
3-Session Virtual Learning Community Session 2 Please join us for our Detoxifying Machismo series that takes a critical look at how Latino fathers have often been ignored, forgotten and even vilified by behavioral health professionals and the system of care. Explore intersections of stigma/culturally relevant healing, care provision in mental health and substance use disorder, and in developing care for Latino fathers. Our three panelists and moderator will provide their personal and professional perspectives as Latino fathers working in behavioral health care providing fields. Participants will be engaged in meaningful dialogue on this dynamic topic and will leave the series with practical tools to implement culturally and linguistically appropriate standards in their behavioral health delivery services to better engage with, recruit and retain Latino males and fathers in their programs. Learning Objectives: Uncover and Address Myths about Latino Fathers. Address the Machismo Stigma: Unpacking then rebalancing how current narratives negative impact perceptions of Latino father. Present and Discuss Models for Care and Support of Latino Fathers/Latino Men Understand the bi-directional impact machismo has had on access to and perception of behavioral health service delivery. Pierluigi Mancini, PhD, MAC - Moderator Project Director for the National Hispanic and Latino Addiction Technology Transfer Center and the National Hispanic and Latino Prevention Technology Transfer Center. Roberto Gurza, LMFT - Panelist Over a 40-yr career, has worked as a public and nonprofit leader, focused on the individual, organizational, and systemic factors involved in the delivery of culturally and linguistically relevant care to un- and under-served communities. Juan Escobedo, MA - Panelist Experienced in strategic planning, program development, evaluation, implementation, and consultation for numerous agency initiatives, committees, and non-profits in the public sector. Currently a program officer working for Caring for Denver Foundation improving the mental health and substance misuse needs of all residents of the City and County of Denver. Brian Serna, LPCC, LADAC - Panelist CEO/Founder of Serna Solutions and a trainer and consultant in behavioral health issues related to Evidence Based Practices, Cultural Considerations and Ethical Issues. He is also the Director of the Addictions, Abuse and Recovery Certificate at Southwestern College in Santa Fe, NM and the current President of NAADAC New Mexico.
Published: June 24, 2021
Multimedia
3-Session Virtual Learning Community Session 1 Please join us for our Detoxifying Machismo series that takes a critical look at how Latino fathers have often been ignored, forgotten and even vilified by behavioral health professionals and the system of care. Explore intersections of stigma/culturally relevant healing, care provision in mental health and substance use disorder, and in developing care for Latino fathers. Our three panelists and moderator will provide their personal and professional perspectives as Latino fathers working in behavioral health care providing fields. Participants will be engaged in meaningful dialogue on this dynamic topic and will leave the series with practical tools to implement culturally and linguistically appropriate standards in their behavioral health delivery services to better engage with, recruit and retain Latino males and fathers in their programs. Learning Objectives: Uncover and Address Myths about Latino Fathers. Address the Machismo Stigma: Unpacking then rebalancing how current narratives negative impact perceptions of Latino father. Present and Discuss Models for Care and Support of Latino Fathers/Latino Men Understand the bi-directional impact machismo has had on access to and perception of behavioral health service delivery. Pierluigi Mancini, PhD, MAC - Moderator Project Director for the National Hispanic and Latino Addiction Technology Transfer Center and the National Hispanic and Latino Prevention Technology Transfer Center. Roberto Gurza, LMFT - Panelist Over a 40-yr career, has worked as a public and nonprofit leader, focused on the individual, organizational, and systemic factors involved in the delivery of culturally and linguistically relevant care to un- and under-served communities. Juan Escobedo, MA - Panelist Experienced in strategic planning, program development, evaluation, implementation, and consultation for numerous agency initiatives, committees, and non-profits in the public sector. Currently a program officer working for Caring for Denver Foundation improving the mental health and substance misuse needs of all residents of the City and County of Denver. Brian Serna, LPCC, LADAC - Panelist CEO/Founder of Serna Solutions and a trainer and consultant in behavioral health issues related to Evidence Based Practices, Cultural Considerations and Ethical Issues. He is also the Director of the Addictions, Abuse and Recovery Certificate at Southwestern College in Santa Fe, NM and the current President of NAADAC New Mexico.
Published: June 17, 2021
Multimedia
The National CLAS Standards are intended to advance health equity, improve quality, and help eliminate health care disparities. This webinar will discuss how health care organizations need to ensure that awareness, adoption, and implementation of the National CLAS Standards are incorporated to have a more inclusive definition of culture in order to better adolescents. OBJECTIVES: Highlights of the enhanced CLAS Standards that contribute to positive health outcomes for Men who have sex with Men populations Increased awareness on Health, Healthcare and Intersectionality for Men who have sex with Men The impacts of health equity and demographics/societal issues on Men who have sex with Men A profile of innovative services and programming to support wellness for this population PRESENTERS: JACQUELINE COLEMAN MEd, MSM, BA, CPC Certified Professional Coach   ANTHONY FOX LGPC Division Chief for the Capacity Building, Housing and Community Partnerships Division within the HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD, and TB Administration for the District of Columbia Department of Health. 
Published: June 12, 2019
eNewsletter or Blog
The June 2019 Dialogue, contains articles on: Addiction: Men's Health and SUDs (#MensHealthMonth) | Mental Health: Data for Suicide Prevention | Prevention: Improving Prevention Outreach to Men | ORN: Faith Community Lunch & Learn | Region 3 Spotlight: Cultural and Linguistic Competency Seminar, and National Spotlight: Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. If you would like to be added to our mailing list to receive the Dialogue and news and training announcements, sign up here.
Published: June 4, 2019
Multimedia
Dr. Tom Freese shares insights on substance use disorder treatment and recovery issues that affect the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. Dr. Freese is the director of the Pacific Southwest ATTC and also served as co-director of the YMSM+LGBTCenter of Excellence. 
Published: January 18, 2019

The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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