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eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The May 2024 issue features content celebrating Mental Health Awareness Month, Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Hepatitis C Awareness Month, and National Prevention Week. You will also find links to upcoming trainings focused on the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery, prevention efforts in rural communities, and trauma-informed care for transition-age youth. Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!  
Published: May 10, 2024
Curriculum Package
Discover the Benefits of DBT for Individuals in Substance Use Disorder Recovery   Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) has emerged as a powerful evidence-based approach to addressing the complexities of substance use disorders, offering a comprehensive toolkit that extends beyond conventional methods. In this six-hour training, participants will delve into the core principles and techniques of DBT, exploring how they enrich SUD treatment by fostering mindfulness, enhancing interpersonal skills, regulating emotions, and bolstering distress tolerance. This training package includes a 6-hour PowerPoint presentation (full curriculum) and a 13-page handout packet. There are various options for presenting the 6 hours of content, including through a 1, 2, or 3-hour workshop, a single full-day (6-hour) training session, or two 3-hour sessions, which allows for convenient scheduling while maintaining satisfactory coverage of the material. All materials contained in this training package are 508 compliant.   Learning Objectives: At the end of this training, participants will be able to: Distinguish two (2) specific behaviors that DBT is designed to treat and the origins of DBT Describe the four (4) groups of skills utilized in DBT (Mindfulness, Interpersonal Effectiveness, Emotion Regulation, and Distress Tolerance) Identify two (2) ways in which DBT skills can be useful for substance use disorders Apply one (1) specific DBT Skill pertaining to one of the four (4) DBT skills Explain two (2) specific ways in which DBT can be integrated into an SUD treatment setting In-Depth Description of Training:  Originally developed to address chronic suicidal ideation and borderline personality disorder (BPD), DBT blends cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with a dialectical philosophy, emphasizing acceptance and change simultaneously. Over time, research has shown its effectiveness in treating a spectrum of mood disorders including depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), eating disorders, and importantly, substance use disorders. This training explores how DBT goes beyond its original purpose, becoming a pivotal intervention in reshaping behavioral patterns and becoming a crucial tool in reshaping behaviors, particularly concerning substance misuse. Through this structured curriculum, participants will gain insights into the four core skill sets (modules) of DBT: Mindfulness, Interpersonal Effectiveness, Emotion Regulation, and Distress Tolerance. Throughout this training, participants will examine the nuanced ways in which each skill set intertwines with SUD treatment, promoting a holistic approach toward recovery. Mindfulness, as the cornerstone of DBT, encourages individuals to embrace the present moment, detaching from harmful thought patterns and impulses. Interpersonal Effectiveness skills equip individuals with strategies for building healthy relationships, crucial in navigating support networks during recovery journeys. Emotion Regulation skills teach mechanisms for managing intense feelings, providing tools to modulate emotional responses without resorting to substance use, while distress tolerance skills empower individuals to withstand cravings and urge to use, fostering resilience in recovery. Moreover, this training underscores the importance of DBT in addressing co-occurring mental health disorders, breaking down barriers to recovery, and promoting sustained abstinence from substances. By fostering engagement, trust, and collaboration, DBT sets the stage for long-term success, enabling individuals to reclaim agency over their lives and forge a path toward lasting wellness. In summary, this six-hour training serves as a roadmap towards integrating DBT principles into SUD treatment, equipping participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to effect transformative change in the lives of those grappling with substance misuse.
Published: April 30, 2024
Multimedia
Data sources estimate that between 25 to 75% of people who survive different forms of abuse and/or a violent trauma develop issues related to substance use. Despite the prevalence of trauma, it often goes undetected particularly in people already dealing with life challenges and at high risk of substance use, misuse, and mental health problems.  This interactive training will review variations of trauma and potential impacts on the mind, and how self-regulation techniques can help address traumatic reactions. The content will further discuss practice specific opportunities for integration of trauma-informed care principles and during various points of client interactions. Providers will learn how trauma-informed care provides a preventive approach to engagement and supports person-centered care. This training was approved for three renewal hours (CASAC, CPP, CPS) and three initial hours (CPP, CPS) through New York State’s Office of Addiction Services and Supports (NYS OASAS). As an IC & RC member board, OASAS-accredited courses were granted reciprocal approval by the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee. Many other states offered reciprocity.
Published: April 12, 2024
Multimedia
  While men’s addiction and mental health treatment has been quite successful, there is great room for improvement. This new framework, developed by Mr. Griffin and colleagues, integrates the latest thinking on addiction and recovery, relational cultural theory, male psychological development, and trauma. Current treatment models and theories fail to adequately consider the relational needs of men; often omit a clear understanding of the impact of the socialization process on men; fall short of adequately addressing the impact of abuse and trauma that is so strongly linked with addiction and the life of the male addict; and often ignore any social context and/or the consequences of political, social, and economic power.     TRAINER:   Dan Griffin, MA, is an internationally recognized author, thought leader, and expert on men’s relationships and masculinity. Dan has dedicated his life and work to exploring and redefining what it means to be a man in the 21st century. He is committed to helping men be better men by understanding the impact of the Man Rules on their lives. Dan also helps men find the success in their personal lives they are striving for in their professional ones. Griffin’s books and curricula are all focused on helping men and dads live their best lives. Dan served as a senior fellow at The Meadows, world-renowned experts treating addictive disorders and trauma, from 2015 to 2017. Dan earned a Master’s degree in Sociology from the University of Kansas. For his graduate work, Dan completed the first qualitative study centered on the social construction of masculinity in the culture of Alcoholics Anonymous. Dan is in long-term recovery and lives with his family in Los Angeles   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: March 29, 2024
Multimedia
Humor has long been recognized as a powerful tool in therapy, capable of breaking down barriers, fostering rapport, and promoting healing. This interactive session presented by Mallori DeSalle, MA, LMHC, NCC, CMHC, CHP, delves into the art and science of using therapeutic humor to support clients in their therapeutic journey. Participants will explore the multifaceted benefits of humor in therapy, including its ability to reduce stress, enhance resilience, and facilitate emotional processing. Through case studies, role-playing exercises, and group discussions, attendees will learn practical strategies for incorporating humor into their therapeutic practice in a safe and ethical manner. Whether you're a seasoned therapist looking to refresh your approach or a new practitioner eager to expand your therapeutic toolkit, this session offers valuable insights and practical techniques for harnessing the power of humor to support your clients on their path to healing and growth. Join us and discover how humor can be a transformative force in the therapeutic process. Download slides | View recording
Published: March 27, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
Dr. Nora Volkow is the Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health. Her research sheds light on one of the most important indicators that someone will or will not reach out for support for their substance use: stigma.[1] She states that: "The words we use to describe mental illnesses and substance use disorders (addiction to alcohol and other legal and illegal drugs) can impact the likelihood that people will seek help and the quality of the help they receive. Research indicates that stigma—negative attitudes toward people based on distinguishing characteristics—contributes in multiple ways to poorer health outcomes; consequently, it has been identified as a critical focus for research and interventions."[2] Addiction, along with mental health challenges, have long been some of the most stigmatized conditions. Countless research studies show that when there are stigmatizing attitudes, fewer people reach out for help. This is especially concerning considering the percentages of people who don’t receive the treatment they need (nearly 90% of the people who need support for their substance use challenges or addiction do not get it).[3] The Words We Use Matter How we talk about addiction and recovery matters. Not just because of the words we say, but because of the words we hear—and what our loved ones hear and in turn, can internalize. Research from 2019 shows that nearly 20% of people who needed help didn’t get it because they were concerned about what their neighbors or community would think.[4] There are things that we can do as loved ones to learn how to talk about addiction and also why this matters—and how it can help end addiction stigma. Understanding the science of addiction and recovery is a first step. You may be like me (not a neuroscientist) and that’s okay. There’s a way to understand what happens on a physical level when we experience substance use disorder or substance misuse challenges. Flo Hilliard, MSH, founding member of Faces & Voices of Recovery and expert in the field of addiction science explains it this way: "Many medical conditions, like Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular disease, are linked to not only a genetic predisposition but also to patterns or habits that can lead to "turning on" the gene for that condition. Substance use disorders often follow the same pattern, yet there is often stigma and shame attached to the normal progression of the medical condition. Understanding the basic brain science of addiction and recovery is a fundamental step in eliminating stigma and treating those suffering from this disorder as respected human beings. Research shows that with the proper treatment and support people can and do recover from addiction to alcohol and other drugs to have successful professional and personal lives." When we understand that addiction is a normal part of the human experience, it loses its ability to be framed as something requiring punitive measures. Something that causes shame. It lacks the power to divide into “us vs. them.” Addiction or substance use disorders are worthy of our understanding and compassion. There are some excellent resources out there, including ones through the ATTC network, including their Addiction Science Made Easy Series, that share information about the science of addiction and recovery so we not only understand it but understand how to talk about it. How We Talk About Addiction Recovery Matters There are simple ways that you can talk about addiction and recovery that decrease stigma. The National Institute on Drug Abuse or NIDA shares these helpful ways to talk about addiction recovery:[5],[6] Use person-first language Promote community education about addiction Share recovery stories Education programs for folks who work with those of us in or seeking recovery like doctors, nurses, treatment providers, counselors, and church leaders Here is another helpful resource from SAMHSA: Overcoming Stigma Ending Discrimination. Check out this helpful chart from NIDA: Words Matter - Terms to Use and Avoid When Talking About Addiction. Women and Addiction Stigma Stigma is even more prevalent for women, especially mothers, and women of color, and this has been known for decades.[7] It's part of why I founded and host the annual event with the SHE RECOVERS foundation that highlights and celebrates women’s recovery during Women’s History Month on International Women’s Day every year. This year, we are focusing on highlighting the next generation and why it’s important to not only share stories of recovery but also share what works in terms of recovery support services. Gathering as a global community of supporters of recovery is not only an incredible experience, it has a purpose: to help reduce the addiction recovery stigma that women face.[8] Since women, especially from under-resourced and underserved communities, experience higher levels of addiction stigma and are thus, less likely to seek support, we all must work to address this issue that impacts millions. When we share our stories of recovery in the light, it can illuminate hope for others and show that recovery is possible. When we use supportive and hope-filled language, we can be a part of eradicating the stigma and discrimination that has no place in our recovery-oriented world today. Join us this March and celebrate. For more information and to register for free visit: https://sherecovers.org/international-womens-day-2024/ Time and date don’t work for you? No problem! Register for a link to watch on demand any time or plan your own watch party.   Caroline Beidler, MSW is an author, recovery advocate, and founder of the storytelling platform Circle of Chairs. With almost 20 years in leadership within social work and ministry, she is currently a consultant with JBS International, along with the founder and host of the annual International Women’s Day Global Recovery Event presented by the SHE RECOVERS Foundation. Connect with her @carolinebeidler_official and  https://www.facebook.com/carolinebeidlermsw   [1] Volkow, N.D., Gordon, J.A. & Koob, G.F. Choosing appropriate language to reduce the stigma around mental illness and substance use disorders. Neuropsychopharmacol. 46, 2230–2232 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-021-01069-4 [2] National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Ending Discrimination Against People with Mental and Substance Use Disorders: the Evidence for Stigma Change. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2016. https://doi.org/10.17226/23442. [3] Hammarlund R, Crapanzano KA, Luce L, Mulligan L, Ward KM. Review of the effects of self-stigma and perceived social stigma on the treatment-seeking decisions of individuals with drug- and alcohol-use disorders. Subst Abus Rehabil. 2018;9:115–36. https://doi.org/10.2147/SAR.S183256. Published 2018 Nov 23. [4] Han B. Key substance use and mental health indicators in the United States: results from the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (HHS Publication No. PEP20-07-01-001, NSDUH Series H-55). Rockville, MD: Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; 2020. [5] Volkow, N.D., Gordon, J.A. & Koob, G.F. Choosing appropriate language to reduce the stigma around mental illness and substance use disorders. Neuropsychopharmacol. 46, 2230–2232 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-021-01069-4 [6] Livingston, J. D., Milne, T., Fang, M. L., & Amari, E. (2012). The effectiveness of interventions for reducing stigma related to substance use disorders: a systematic review. Addiction (Abingdon, England), 107(1), 39–50. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2011.03601.x [7] Radcliffe P. Motherhood, Pregnancy, and the Negotiation of Identity: The Moral Career of Drug Treatment. Social Science & Medicine. 2011;72:984–991. [8] Page, S., Fedorowicz, S., McCormack, F., Whitehead, S. (2024). Women, Addictions, Mental Health, Dishonesty, and Crime Stigma: Solutions to Reduce the Social Harms of Stigma. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 21(1):63. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21010063
Published: March 5, 2024
Multimedia
This webinar, hosted by the Northwest ATTC, PTTC, and MHTTC, provided an overview of the seven vital conditions for well-being and illustrated how the framework can be useful for conceptualizing holistic individual and community well-being.  The presenters, Chris Kelleher (consultant) and Jennifer Johnson (Skagit County Deputy County Administrator), demonstrated how the framework can help address issues related to a community response to mental health and well-being, substance use disorder, and substance misuse prevention in Skagit County, WA, with the North Star Initiative. The framework is used by multiple state and federal agencies, including The Federal Plan for Equitable Long-Term Recovery and Resilience as a guiding framework to organize and take action on social determinants of health. Watch the recording here.  
Published: February 20, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The December 2023 issue shares recorded content on wound care and xylazine, social media basics for preventionists, an infographic on providing behavioral healthcare to people living with HIV, and SAMHSA's tips for supporting your mental health through the holidays. As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!   Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list, so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter and thank you for reading!
Published: December 7, 2023
Multimedia
Talking To Change: A Motivational Interviewing Podcast, hosted by Glenn Hinds and Sebastian Kaplan, is a series of conversations exploring Motivational Interviewing (MI) and its influence on supporting individuals and groups as they make positive health and lifestyle changes. Talking to Change: An MI Podcast. Episode 70: MI in the Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, with Dr. Jim Carter In this episode, hosts Glenn and Sebastian talk to Dr. Jim Carter, a licensed clinical psychologist who recently founded a specialized online clinic called OCD123. Dr. Carter talks about what obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is, how to help people with OCD, and how our minds work and alternatives for when we get stuck. The episode ends with the group performing and then debriefing a role play focused on helping a new father with fears of contamination/germs.
Published: November 22, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
November 2023 Dialogue: ATTC: Trans Awareness Week | MHTTC: School Well-Being Learning Community | PTTC: Fostering Inclusivity and Substance Use Prevention | ORN: Finding a Voice. Additional sections include behavioral health observances, virtual training and webinar events, and new resources. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the HHS Region 3/Central East region. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected].   Sign up to receive the Dialogue and our weekly training bulletin in your mailbox.   Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: November 7, 2023
Multimedia
Please find the slides and the video for the Substance Use Disorder and the LGBTQ+ Community: Assessing the Impact of Compounded Stigma and Treatment Considerations on October 30 and November 6 from 1 pm - 2:30 (CST). Substance use is a complex issue that affects individuals from all walks of life, including the LGBTQ+ community. Members of this community face unique challenges when seeking help for addiction. Stigma, shame, and a lack of family support can all make it difficult for LGBTQ individuals to access the resources they need to overcome substance use disorders. Additionally, growing anti-LBGTQ legislation can further exacerbate these issues, creating a hostile environment for individuals struggling with addiction.   Session 1: Click here to watch the video Session 2: Click here to watch the video Click the button above to download the slides Objectives: Educate Substance Use Disorder (SUD)  providers on the unique challenges faced by LGBTQ+ individuals with SUD Increase awareness of the compounded stigma and discrimination the LGBTQ+ community may experience Learn to provide effective and culturally competent treatment to the LGBTQ+ population   Presenter Information: Darla Belflower has worked in substance use disorder and behavioral health for over three decades. She started a training and consultation business in 2022. She is a member of The Missouri Behavioral Health Council’s Culture, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (CEDI) Committee. She is also Vice Chair of the Kansas City Recovery Coalition and is active in the Kansas City Recovery Community. Being in long-term recovery from a substance use disorder inspired her to write her memoir, I Am Not Anonymous. She has also authored two booklets and is writing a workbook on Substance Use Disorder and Trauma that will be released in the spring of 2025. Ms. Belflower is a Clinically Licensed Social Worker in both Missouri and Kansas, a Licensed Addiction Counselor in Kansas, a Certified Reciprocal Advanced Alcohol and Drug Counselor in Missouri, a Certified Peer Specialist, a Certified Tobacco Treatment Specialist, a Certified Harm Reduction Specialist, and a trainer and educator of Narcan distribution. Darla and her wife live in Kansas City, Missouri, and enjoy spending time with their daughter. She is passionate about teaching and training so that others may learn how to help those most vulnerable individuals she has enjoyed working with. CEUs are pending. Please email Bree at [email protected] for any questions.
Published: November 2, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The October 2023 issue honors National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, National Youth Substance Use Prevention Month, Hispanic Heritage Month, World Mental Health Day (October 10), and the newest installment of the NIATx in New Places blog series on the ATTC/NIATx Service Improvement Blog! As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!
Published: October 5, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The September 2023 issue honors National Recovery Month, National Hispanic Heritage Month, Addiction Professionals Appreciation Day (September 20), and the 10th anniversary of the ATTC/NIATx Service Improvement Blog! As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!
Published: September 7, 2023
Print Media
A reflection on Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Month and Hispanic Heritage Month will be featured in this issue by Dr. Susie Villalobos. This newsletter highlights the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, which promotes awareness about suicide and suicide prevention among Hispanic and Latino populations. Please read to learn more about the resources we are highlighting this quarter, our upcoming events and projects, and more. THIS ISSUE 1 Dicho of the Quarter 2 A Reflection by Dr. Susie Villalobos 5 Highlighting the Experts American Foundation for Suicide Prevention 7 Quarterly Highlights, and Celebrations 8 Media Corner   9 Staff Contact Information Español En esta edición, la Dra. Susie Villalobos presentará una reflexión sobre el Mes de la Salud Mental y la Prevención del Suicidio y el Mes de la Herencia Hispana. Este boletín destaca la Fundación Americana para la Prevención del Suicidio, que promueve la concientización sobre el suicidio y la prevención del suicidio entre las poblaciones hispana y latina. Lea para obtener más información sobre los recursos que destacamos este trimestre, nuestros próximos eventos y proyectos, y más. EN ESTA EDICION 1 El “Dicho” del Trimestre 2 Una Reflexión de la Dra. Susie Villalobos 5 Destacando a los Expertos: American Foundation for Suicide Prevention 7 Puntos Destacados del Trimestre y Celebraciones 8 Rincón de los Medios   9 Información de Contacto del Personal
Published: September 6, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
September 2023 Dialogue – Addiction: Nurturing Purpose in Recovery: Unveiling Passions and Living Intentionally | MHTTC: Improving Suicide Prevention Strategies in Maryland | Prevention: National Suicide Prevention Month | ORN: Addressing Regional Needs. Additional sections include behavioral health observances, virtual training and webinar events, Region 3 news, and new publications/resources. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the HHS Region 3/Central East region. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected].   Sign up to receive the Dialogue and our weekly training bulletin in your mailbox.   Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: September 5, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The August 2023 issue honors International Overdose Awareness Day (August 31), opioid overdose prevention training on HealtheKnowledge, and the newest NIATx in New Places series blog post written by Lynn Madden, PhD, MPA.  And as always, you will find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!  
Published: August 3, 2023
Print Media
  The Technology Transfer Centers: Dissemination and Implementation Working Group, composed of representatives across the ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC, developed two infographics for the most common intensive technical assistance strategies used to help states, organizations, and front-line providers implement evidence-based services.   The three strategies are: Learning Collaboratives External Facilitation NIATx Organizational Change Model   These are two of many technical assistance strategies offered and deployed across the TTC Network. Additional infographics simply describing other strategies for consumers are in the planning stages. User-friendly infographics are expected to assist decision-makers in making more informed selections about the kinds of assistance or support they need.  
Published: July 5, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
July 2023 Dialogue – Addiction: We Live it Every Day (DEI) | MHTTC: Improving LGBTQIA2S+ Youth Outcomes | Prevention: National BIPOC Mental Health Month: Culture, Community, & Connection | ORN: BIPOC Communities and Families | Regional Spotlight: 2023 Syndemic Solutions Summit. Additional sections include behavioral health observances, virtual training and webinar events, Region 3 news, and new publications/resources. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the HHS Region 3/Central East region. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected].   Sign up to receive the Dialogue and our weekly training bulletin in your mailbox.   Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: July 5, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The July 2023 issue honors National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month and World Hepatitis Day (July 28) by sharing events and resources on these topics. This issue also features newly released episodes from the Checking-In Podcast that focus on PTSD treatment providers' self-care and a new HealtheKnowledge course developed by the Great Lakes ATTC: NIATx Change Leader Academy: Rapid-Cycle Change for Teams.    As always, you will find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!  
Published: July 3, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The June 2023 issue honors National Pride Month, National PTSD Awareness Month, and Men's Health Month by sharing events and resources on these topics. As always, you will find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!  
Published: June 5, 2023
Print Media
This Issue: LAYING GROUNDWORK FOR A HARVEST AND HEALTHY YEAR This issue will bring a reflection by our NHL ATTC Co-Director, celebrating Mental Health Awareness Month. Elisabeth Stelson discusses a Vicarious Trauma research study. Please read to learn more about the resources we are highlighting this quarter, our upcoming events and projects, and more. In This Issue 01 Dicho of the Quarter 02 A Reflection by Our NHL ATTC Co-Director 03 Article by Elisabeth Stelson, MSW, LSW, MPH (Ph.D. Candidate) 05 Quarterly Highlights, and Celebrations 06 Media Corner 07 Staff Contact Information Esta edición traerá una reflexión de nuestra Co-Directora del NHL ATTC, celebrando el Mes de Concientización sobre la Salud Mental. Elisabeth Stelson habla sobre un estudio de investigación sobre trauma vicario. Lea para obtener más información sobre los recursos que destacamos este trimestre, nuestros próximos eventos y proyectos, y más. EN ESTA EDICION 01 El “Dicho” del Trimestre 02 Una Reflexión de Nuestra Co-Directora del NHL-ATTC 03 Artículo de Elisabeth Stelson, MSW,LSW, MPH (Candidata al Doctorado) 05 Puntos Destacados del TrimestreyCelebraciones 06 Rincón de los Medios 07 Información de Contacto del Personal
Published: May 30, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
  The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The April-May 2023 issue honors National Mental Health Awareness Month, National Children's Mental Health Awareness Week, National Asian American and Pacific Islanders Heritage Month, and National Prevention Week by sharing events and resources on these topics. This issue also features an upcoming in-person conference and an exciting, new intensive technical assistance training series sponsored by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.    As always, you will find links to all the upcoming events and trainings for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC in The Great Lakes Current.   
Published: May 4, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
May 2023 Dialogue – Addiction: Deadly Impact of Fentanyl | MHTTC: Mental Health Awareness Month | Prevention: SAMHSA’s National Prevention Week: Promoting Health and Wellness | ORN: Make Possibilities a Reality | Regional Spotlight: ORN Xylazine Regional Summit. Additional sections include behavioral health observances, virtual training and webinar events, Region 3 news, and new publications/resources. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the HHS Region 3/Central East region. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected].   Sign up to receive the Dialogue and our weekly training bulletin in your mailbox.   Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: May 2, 2023
Print Media
****Available in English and Spanish**** This snapshot of information is intended to provide resources to individuals, parents, professionals, and providers regarding the peer recovery specialists' impact on behavioral health among Latinos in the United States.   ESPECIALISTAS EN RECUPERACIÓN ENTRE PARES PARA UNA SALUD MENTAL EQUITATIVA ENTRE HISPANOS Y LATINOS Esta reseña informativa tiene por objeto proporcionar recursos a individuos, padres, profesionales y proveedores sobre el impacto de los especialistas en recuperación entre pares en la salud mental de los Latinos en Estados Unidos.
Published: April 28, 2023
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The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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