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Multimedia
This is a recording of the webinar held June 11, 2024. It provided training to give participants a broad understanding of LGBTQ+ culture, demographic terms, the data on population experiences, and tools that can be used in patient care and within an organization as a whole. Presented by Faye Seidler.
Published: June 11, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The June 2024 issue features content celebrating Pride Month, PTSD Awareness Month, and Intersection of Addiction and Racism: A Curated Bibliography‒a new comprehensive resource created by AMERSA, the ATTC NCO, and the PTTC NCO. You will also find links to upcoming trainings focused on the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery, prevention efforts in rural communities, and trauma-informed care for transition-age youth. Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!  
Published: June 6, 2024
Multimedia
This is a recording of the webinar presented May 16th, 2024, by Craig Uthe, MD Significant challenges exist in providing safe and adequate care to the patient with co-occurring chronic pain and opioid use disorder. Establishing trust with and empowering this patient to be an active participant in their health is a difficult but necessary step. During this session, we will identify specific polarizing factors of chronic pain and OUD that make this work difficult and discuss strategies to enhance collaboration between patient and caregiver/prescriber that focus on the risk/benefit ratio in longitudinal care.
Published: May 16, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The May 2024 issue features content celebrating Mental Health Awareness Month, Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Hepatitis C Awareness Month, and National Prevention Week. You will also find links to upcoming trainings focused on the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery, prevention efforts in rural communities, and trauma-informed care for transition-age youth. Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!  
Published: May 10, 2024
Curriculum Package
Discover the Benefits of DBT for Individuals in Substance Use Disorder Recovery   Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) has emerged as a powerful evidence-based approach to addressing the complexities of substance use disorders, offering a comprehensive toolkit that extends beyond conventional methods. In this six-hour training, participants will delve into the core principles and techniques of DBT, exploring how they enrich SUD treatment by fostering mindfulness, enhancing interpersonal skills, regulating emotions, and bolstering distress tolerance. This training package includes a 6-hour PowerPoint presentation (full curriculum) and a 13-page handout packet. There are various options for presenting the 6 hours of content, including through a 1, 2, or 3-hour workshop, a single full-day (6-hour) training session, or two 3-hour sessions, which allows for convenient scheduling while maintaining satisfactory coverage of the material. All materials contained in this training package are 508 compliant.   Learning Objectives: At the end of this training, participants will be able to: Distinguish two (2) specific behaviors that DBT is designed to treat and the origins of DBT Describe the four (4) groups of skills utilized in DBT (Mindfulness, Interpersonal Effectiveness, Emotion Regulation, and Distress Tolerance) Identify two (2) ways in which DBT skills can be useful for substance use disorders Apply one (1) specific DBT Skill pertaining to one of the four (4) DBT skills Explain two (2) specific ways in which DBT can be integrated into an SUD treatment setting In-Depth Description of Training:  Originally developed to address chronic suicidal ideation and borderline personality disorder (BPD), DBT blends cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with a dialectical philosophy, emphasizing acceptance and change simultaneously. Over time, research has shown its effectiveness in treating a spectrum of mood disorders including depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), eating disorders, and importantly, substance use disorders. This training explores how DBT goes beyond its original purpose, becoming a pivotal intervention in reshaping behavioral patterns and becoming a crucial tool in reshaping behaviors, particularly concerning substance misuse. Through this structured curriculum, participants will gain insights into the four core skill sets (modules) of DBT: Mindfulness, Interpersonal Effectiveness, Emotion Regulation, and Distress Tolerance. Throughout this training, participants will examine the nuanced ways in which each skill set intertwines with SUD treatment, promoting a holistic approach toward recovery. Mindfulness, as the cornerstone of DBT, encourages individuals to embrace the present moment, detaching from harmful thought patterns and impulses. Interpersonal Effectiveness skills equip individuals with strategies for building healthy relationships, crucial in navigating support networks during recovery journeys. Emotion Regulation skills teach mechanisms for managing intense feelings, providing tools to modulate emotional responses without resorting to substance use, while distress tolerance skills empower individuals to withstand cravings and urge to use, fostering resilience in recovery. Moreover, this training underscores the importance of DBT in addressing co-occurring mental health disorders, breaking down barriers to recovery, and promoting sustained abstinence from substances. By fostering engagement, trust, and collaboration, DBT sets the stage for long-term success, enabling individuals to reclaim agency over their lives and forge a path toward lasting wellness. In summary, this six-hour training serves as a roadmap towards integrating DBT principles into SUD treatment, equipping participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to effect transformative change in the lives of those grappling with substance misuse.
Published: April 30, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The April 2024 issue spotlights content celebrating National Minority Health Month and Alcohol Awareness Month. It also features links to upcoming trainings focused on supporting Black students experiencing racial trauma, harnessing AI for substance misuse prevention, and process improvement. Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!  
Published: April 12, 2024
Multimedia
Data sources estimate that between 25 to 75% of people who survive different forms of abuse and/or a violent trauma develop issues related to substance use. Despite the prevalence of trauma, it often goes undetected particularly in people already dealing with life challenges and at high risk of substance use, misuse, and mental health problems.  This interactive training will review variations of trauma and potential impacts on the mind, and how self-regulation techniques can help address traumatic reactions. The content will further discuss practice specific opportunities for integration of trauma-informed care principles and during various points of client interactions. Providers will learn how trauma-informed care provides a preventive approach to engagement and supports person-centered care. This training was approved for three renewal hours (CASAC, CPP, CPS) and three initial hours (CPP, CPS) through New York State’s Office of Addiction Services and Supports (NYS OASAS). As an IC & RC member board, OASAS-accredited courses were granted reciprocal approval by the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee. Many other states offered reciprocity.
Published: April 12, 2024
Multimedia
This brief, interactive learning community conversation is for those participants who are new to the evidence-based practice of Motivational Interviewing (MI). Individuals beginning their MI exploration will receive a foundational overview of this often misunderstood method of communication. Although brief, participants will conclude this introduction ready for their next step in what can grow into a fulfilling MI adventure.  This training was approved for one renewal hour (CASAC, CPP, CPS) and one initial hour (CPP, CPS) through New York State’s Office of Addiction Services and Supports (NYS OASAS). As an IC & RC member board, OASAS-accredited courses were granted reciprocal approval by the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee. Many other states offered reciprocity.
Published: April 12, 2024
Multimedia
Most trainings on Motivational Interviewing (MI) convey the "concept" of "Change Talk" as essential to the practice and stop there. This interactive Learning Community Conversation will review the "types" of Change Talk and provide opportunities to practice identifying this truly essential part of the language of ambivalence; along with it's often vilified counterpart, Sustain Talk. A prior working knowledge of MI is helpful if you choose to join this conversation. This training was approved for two renewal hours (CASAC, CPP, CPS) and two initial hours (CPP, CPS) through New York State’s Office of Addiction Services and Supports (NYS OASAS). As an IC & RC member board, OASAS-accredited courses were granted reciprocal approval by the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee. Many other states offered.  
Published: April 12, 2024
Multimedia
"Change Talk" is the solid GOLD motor that builds motivation for behavior change when practicing Motivational Interviewing (MI); without it the change-train is going nowhere and you're not practicing MI. During this Learning Community Conversation (LCC), we will review how to evoke Change Talk and how to employ it, once it's spoken by the client/patient. The LCC "Change Talk" Is Motivational GOLD, a suggested prerequisite to join this conversation. This training was approved for two renewal hours (CASAC, CPP, CPS) and two initial hours (CPP, CPS) through New York State’s Office of Addiction Services and Supports (NYS OASAS). As an IC & RC member board, OASAS accredited courses were granted reciprocal approval by the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee. Many other states offered reciprocity.
Published: April 12, 2024
Multimedia
This 16-hour training (12 hours of live interactive training through Zoom + 4 hours of professional development plan assignments), combined with the 14-hour online “Clinical Supervision Foundations I” training, will meet the 30-hour Clinical Supervision training requirement for the Advanced Counselor and Master Counselor status, as referenced in the OASAS Substance Use Disorder Scope of Practice. This training recognizes the crucial role that Clinical Supervision holds as the cornerstone of performance improvement at both the program and client level. Clinical Supervision, when properly implemented by competent Clinical Supervisors, improves client care, develops clinical skills, and improves the knowledge and professionalism of clinical personnel. It is also paramount in imparting and maintaining ethical standards in the addictions profession. This training met the requirements for 16 renewal hours (CASAC, CPP, CPS) and 16 initial hours (CPP, CPS) through New York State’s Office of Addiction Services and Supports (NYS OASAS). As an IC & RC member board, OASAS accredited courses were granted reciprocal approval by the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee. Many other states offered reciprocity.
Published: April 12, 2024
Multimedia
This 16-hour training (12 hours of live interactive training through Zoom + 4 hours of professional development plan assignments), combined with the 14-hour online “Clinical Supervision Foundations I” training, will meet the 30-hour Clinical Supervision training requirement for the Advanced Counselor and Master Counselor status, as referenced in the OASAS Substance Use Disorder Scope of Practice. This training recognizes the crucial role that Clinical Supervision holds as the cornerstone of performance improvement at both the program and client level. Clinical Supervision, when properly implemented by competent Clinical Supervisors, improves client care, develops clinical skills, and improves the knowledge and professionalism of clinical personnel. It is also paramount in imparting and maintaining ethical standards in the addictions profession. This training met the requirements for 16 renewal hours (CASAC, CPP, CPS) and 16 initial hours (CPP, CPS) through New York State’s Office of Addiction Services and Supports (NYS OASAS). As an IC & RC member board, OASAS accredited courses were granted reciprocal approval by the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee. Many other states offered reciprocity.
Published: April 12, 2024
Multimedia
This 16-hour training (12 hours of live interactive training through Zoom + 4 hours of professional development plan assignments), combined with the 14-hour online “Clinical Supervision Foundations I” training, will meet the 30-hour Clinical Supervision training requirement for the Advanced Counselor and Master Counselor status, as referenced in the OASAS Substance Use Disorder Scope of Practice. This training recognizes the crucial role that Clinical Supervision holds as the cornerstone of performance improvement at both the program and client level. Clinical Supervision, when properly implemented by competent Clinical Supervisors, improves client care, develops clinical skills, and improves the knowledge and professionalism of clinical personnel. It is also paramount in imparting and maintaining ethical standards in the addictions profession. This training met the requirements for 16 renewal hours (CASAC, CPP, CPS) and 16 initial hours (CPP, CPS) through New York State’s Office of Addiction Services and Supports (NYS OASAS). As an IC & RC member board, OASAS accredited courses were granted reciprocal approval by the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee. Many other states offered reciprocity.
Published: April 12, 2024
Toolkit
Over the last six months the ATTC Network Workforce Development, Recruitment, and Retention Workgroup collaborated to create a report titled Strategic Response to Behavioral Workforce Shortages, focusing primarily on barriers to recruitment and retention in the field of behavioral health. This report highlighted three areas of focus: recruitment of new employees to the field, competitive pay, and portability of licenses and certifications. In addition to the brief-style report, the workgroup created three shorter one-pager versions to be printed and used for tabling events. The report highlights identified barriers under each focus, recommended responses to address these barriers, real-world examples of organizations and states that have attempted to remedy these barriers, and action steps for addressing the barriers looking ahead. The intended use for this report is to provide concrete steps for ATTC regional offices to inform future initiatives, as well as initiating conversations at the national level to address the behavioral health workforce shortage.
Published: March 31, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The March 2024 issue spotlights content celebrating Women's History Month and National Social Work Month. It also features updated versions of the Sustainability Planning in Prevention Guidebook and Sustainability Planning in Prevention Toolkit, as well as upcoming trainings focused on provider well-being and culturally responsive services for Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) clients. As always, you will also find links to all scheduled events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC! Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!  
Published: March 18, 2024
Presentation Slides
The New England ATTC, in partnership with the New England Association of Recovery Court Professionals, provided a basic/universal TA webinar titled, "Myth Busters - Dispelling Drug Testing Myths" with subject matter expert Paul Cary. The slides are available for download.
Published: March 16, 2024
Print Media
 DESCRIPTION The COVID-19 pandemic fundamentally shifted the health and wellbeing of every human on planet Earth. LGBTQ community members were impacted early in the crisis, and continue to show disparities in contracting the virus, as well as higher rates of death, disability, substance use disorders, and suicide related to pandemic distress. These impacts were not evenly distributed across all LGBTQ people, however, but were concentrated among queer and transgender of color and gender diverse people in general. New research is emerging that points to both expected and surprising impacts of the disease unique to LGBTQ people. This webinar will explore LGBTQ population dynamics, needs, and ways to support vulnerable community members as the world population emerges into the post-COVID reality.   Please use the download attachment 1 button on the right side of the page to view the entire factsheet in English.     This factsheet is now available in Spanish. Translation services by the National Hispanic and Latino Behavioral Health Center of Excellence. Traducido por: To download the full version of the Spanish factsheet, use the Download Attachment 2 button on the right side of the page.  
Published: March 15, 2024
Print Media
The Central East ATTC is committed to fostering a positive and affirming environment that acknowledges LGBTQ identities and realities. Though nearly every care provider expresses the intention of creating a welcoming environment for LGBTQ clients, good intentions alone are not enough to maintain a practice free of prejudice, repair poor office forms and protocols, minimize microaggressions, and eradicate disrespect for the lived experiences of sexual and gender minority community members. When a member of any marginalized group enters your setting, they are scanning for potential threats, hazards, and disappointments with their care as a reflexive gesture of self-protection. This factsheet provides an overview of indicators for creating safety and engagement techniques that can help build trust and reassurance for your LGBTQ clients. Download this factsheet to learn more.   To download the factsheet in English, please use the download attachment 1 on the right side of the page. This factsheet is now available in Spanish. Translation services by the National Hispanic and Latino Behavioral Health Center of Excellence. Traducido por: To download the full version of the Spanish factsheet, use the Download Attachment 2 button on the right side of the page.  
Published: March 15, 2024
Print Media
DESCRIPTION Though trauma is linked with Substance Use Disorder for people from all walks of life, LGBTQ communities experience unique sources and dynamics of trauma, as well as distinct influences and social consequences that impact the prevalence of Substance Use Disorders within the population. These may include family rejection and estrangement, increased incidence of childhood sexual abuse, identity discernment stress and faith-related shame, survivor’s guilt for those who lost dozens of friends in the early days of the AIDS epidemic, and many other special situations. This webinar will highlight some of the dimensions of trauma specific to LGBTQ individuals, substance use behaviors linked to those events, and some of the unique sites of resilience and support available within LGBTQ communities. Please use the download attachment 1 button on the right side of the page to to view the entire  English factsheet.       This factsheet is now available in Spanish. Translation services by the National Hispanic and Latino Behavioral Health Center of Excellence. Traducido por:   To download the full version of the Spanish factsheet, use the Download Attachment 2 button on the right side of the page.
Published: March 15, 2024
Interactive Resource
This annotated bibliography is a collection of resources related to racism, anti-racism and advancing health equity for Black, Indigenous and other People of Color and other marginalized communities affected by unhealthy substance use and SUD/SUD treatment using a DEI (Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion) framework. It includes recent and classic/landmark papers on racism and SUD/SUD treatment, anti-racist strategies and approaches, advancement of health equity, issues relevant to particular racial groupings, and issues related to various disciplines/roles in healthcare (medical, nursing, social work, etc.). It also includes resources related to health disparities, SDOH, and DEI in the provision of substance use disorder prevention, treatment, and recovery. This project is a collaboration between AMERSA, the Prevention Technology Transfer Center Network Coordinating Office (PTTC NCO), and the Addiction Technology Transfer Center Network Coordinating Office (ATTC NCO).
Published: March 12, 2024
Multimedia
The Institute of Medicine describes person-centered care as the qualities of compassion, respect and responsiveness to the needs, values, and expressed desires of each individual patient. But how do we ensure that we as providers are working from ‘where the client is at’ instead of from our own agenda? Effective engagement strategies grounded in eliciting information, positive regard and empathetic understanding will be discussed. Further, the content will inform and highlight Cultural Humility key components as a means to person-centered care to enhance the opportunities that build trust and rapport. When people who seek services are heard and included in their treatment care, they are more likely to commit to their own recovery and wellness process.    This training was approved for three renewal hours (CASAC, CPP, CPS) and three initial hours (CPP, CPS) through New York State’s Office of Addiction Services and Supports (NYS OASAS). As an IC & RC member board, OASAS accredited courses were granted reciprocal approval by the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee. Many other states offered reciprocity.
Published: March 11, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
Dr. Nora Volkow is the Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health. Her research sheds light on one of the most important indicators that someone will or will not reach out for support for their substance use: stigma.[1] She states that: "The words we use to describe mental illnesses and substance use disorders (addiction to alcohol and other legal and illegal drugs) can impact the likelihood that people will seek help and the quality of the help they receive. Research indicates that stigma—negative attitudes toward people based on distinguishing characteristics—contributes in multiple ways to poorer health outcomes; consequently, it has been identified as a critical focus for research and interventions."[2] Addiction, along with mental health challenges, have long been some of the most stigmatized conditions. Countless research studies show that when there are stigmatizing attitudes, fewer people reach out for help. This is especially concerning considering the percentages of people who don’t receive the treatment they need (nearly 90% of the people who need support for their substance use challenges or addiction do not get it).[3] The Words We Use Matter How we talk about addiction and recovery matters. Not just because of the words we say, but because of the words we hear—and what our loved ones hear and in turn, can internalize. Research from 2019 shows that nearly 20% of people who needed help didn’t get it because they were concerned about what their neighbors or community would think.[4] There are things that we can do as loved ones to learn how to talk about addiction and also why this matters—and how it can help end addiction stigma. Understanding the science of addiction and recovery is a first step. You may be like me (not a neuroscientist) and that’s okay. There’s a way to understand what happens on a physical level when we experience substance use disorder or substance misuse challenges. Flo Hilliard, MSH, founding member of Faces & Voices of Recovery and expert in the field of addiction science explains it this way: "Many medical conditions, like Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular disease, are linked to not only a genetic predisposition but also to patterns or habits that can lead to "turning on" the gene for that condition. Substance use disorders often follow the same pattern, yet there is often stigma and shame attached to the normal progression of the medical condition. Understanding the basic brain science of addiction and recovery is a fundamental step in eliminating stigma and treating those suffering from this disorder as respected human beings. Research shows that with the proper treatment and support people can and do recover from addiction to alcohol and other drugs to have successful professional and personal lives." When we understand that addiction is a normal part of the human experience, it loses its ability to be framed as something requiring punitive measures. Something that causes shame. It lacks the power to divide into “us vs. them.” Addiction or substance use disorders are worthy of our understanding and compassion. There are some excellent resources out there, including ones through the ATTC network, including their Addiction Science Made Easy Series, that share information about the science of addiction and recovery so we not only understand it but understand how to talk about it. How We Talk About Addiction Recovery Matters There are simple ways that you can talk about addiction and recovery that decrease stigma. The National Institute on Drug Abuse or NIDA shares these helpful ways to talk about addiction recovery:[5],[6] Use person-first language Promote community education about addiction Share recovery stories Education programs for folks who work with those of us in or seeking recovery like doctors, nurses, treatment providers, counselors, and church leaders Here is another helpful resource from SAMHSA: Overcoming Stigma Ending Discrimination. Check out this helpful chart from NIDA: Words Matter - Terms to Use and Avoid When Talking About Addiction. Women and Addiction Stigma Stigma is even more prevalent for women, especially mothers, and women of color, and this has been known for decades.[7] It's part of why I founded and host the annual event with the SHE RECOVERS foundation that highlights and celebrates women’s recovery during Women’s History Month on International Women’s Day every year. This year, we are focusing on highlighting the next generation and why it’s important to not only share stories of recovery but also share what works in terms of recovery support services. Gathering as a global community of supporters of recovery is not only an incredible experience, it has a purpose: to help reduce the addiction recovery stigma that women face.[8] Since women, especially from under-resourced and underserved communities, experience higher levels of addiction stigma and are thus, less likely to seek support, we all must work to address this issue that impacts millions. When we share our stories of recovery in the light, it can illuminate hope for others and show that recovery is possible. When we use supportive and hope-filled language, we can be a part of eradicating the stigma and discrimination that has no place in our recovery-oriented world today. Join us this March and celebrate. For more information and to register for free visit: https://sherecovers.org/international-womens-day-2024/ Time and date don’t work for you? No problem! Register for a link to watch on demand any time or plan your own watch party.   Caroline Beidler, MSW is an author, recovery advocate, and founder of the storytelling platform Circle of Chairs. With almost 20 years in leadership within social work and ministry, she is currently a consultant with JBS International, along with the founder and host of the annual International Women’s Day Global Recovery Event presented by the SHE RECOVERS Foundation. Connect with her @carolinebeidler_official and  https://www.facebook.com/carolinebeidlermsw   [1] Volkow, N.D., Gordon, J.A. & Koob, G.F. Choosing appropriate language to reduce the stigma around mental illness and substance use disorders. Neuropsychopharmacol. 46, 2230–2232 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-021-01069-4 [2] National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Ending Discrimination Against People with Mental and Substance Use Disorders: the Evidence for Stigma Change. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2016. https://doi.org/10.17226/23442. [3] Hammarlund R, Crapanzano KA, Luce L, Mulligan L, Ward KM. Review of the effects of self-stigma and perceived social stigma on the treatment-seeking decisions of individuals with drug- and alcohol-use disorders. Subst Abus Rehabil. 2018;9:115–36. https://doi.org/10.2147/SAR.S183256. Published 2018 Nov 23. [4] Han B. Key substance use and mental health indicators in the United States: results from the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (HHS Publication No. PEP20-07-01-001, NSDUH Series H-55). Rockville, MD: Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; 2020. [5] Volkow, N.D., Gordon, J.A. & Koob, G.F. Choosing appropriate language to reduce the stigma around mental illness and substance use disorders. Neuropsychopharmacol. 46, 2230–2232 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-021-01069-4 [6] Livingston, J. D., Milne, T., Fang, M. L., & Amari, E. (2012). The effectiveness of interventions for reducing stigma related to substance use disorders: a systematic review. Addiction (Abingdon, England), 107(1), 39–50. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2011.03601.x [7] Radcliffe P. Motherhood, Pregnancy, and the Negotiation of Identity: The Moral Career of Drug Treatment. Social Science & Medicine. 2011;72:984–991. [8] Page, S., Fedorowicz, S., McCormack, F., Whitehead, S. (2024). Women, Addictions, Mental Health, Dishonesty, and Crime Stigma: Solutions to Reduce the Social Harms of Stigma. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 21(1):63. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21010063
Published: March 5, 2024
Other
The New England ATTC, in partnership with RICARES, held the next monthly installment of the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction Reading Group series. We discussed a paper titled, “Hospitalizations for Alcohol and Opioid Use Disorders in Older Adults: Trends, Comorbidities, and Differences by Gender, Race, and Ethnicity,” by Acevedo and colleagues. A summary of the discussion is available for download. Article link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/epub/10.1177/11782218221116733 Please find the the meeting summary here: ATTC ReadingGroup 02222024 Summary
Published: February 23, 2024
Other
This  Black History Month, let's pause to recognize the remarkable achievements, unwavering strength, and outstanding triumphs of the Black community. It's also a time for us to recommit to cultivating an environment of inclusiveness, fairness, and opportunities for all. By recognizing and elevating diverse voices, we enrich our workplace and the vitality of our organizations, communities, and society. Take advantage of MATTC’s FREE Culturally & Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) training to improve your organization’s quality of services provided to all individuals, which will ultimately help reduce health disparities and achieve health equity. More information is found in the flyer attached! Please email [email protected] for additional information. 
Published: February 22, 2024
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The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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