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Products and Resources Catalog

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Multimedia
Presented By: Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC Recorded on June 30, 2020  |  Module 8/8
Published: July 14, 2020
Print Media
This workshop is designed to highlight and explore the needs of substance use treatment professionals working with culturally diverse individuals, organizations, and communities.  The participants will be able to understand the role cultural competency in clinical settings and will learn proven techniques and strategies for engagement.  The training includes didactic as well as interactive exercises designed to engage participants and elicit their input.  The training is intended for entry to advanced level.
Published: June 18, 2020
Multimedia
While racism and classism are not exclusive to the United States, the American paradigm is unique due to its history of slavery, conquest, and immigration.  Each new wave of immigrants to America has experienced systematic inequality in a system based on ethnic and racial oppression. The pressure of conforming and confronting this system produces stress and mental anguish, which primarily afflicts minority communities.  In the recorded presentation Liberty Humiliation, and Identity: Race and the Suffering of America, Albert Thompson will cover how to engage in a dialogue about physical and mental health that encompasses societal morbidity. We will examine how particular events in our history demonstrate the consequences of racial views and our need to listen and engage. Behavioral health providers must consider race and the impact it has on leadership. Change leaders need to be politically and socially knowledgeable, listen, and understand a broader perspective of historical foreign and domestic policy related to race, ethnicity, and culture. To gain the agility necessary to navigate within an ever-growing diverse population in need of mental health and addiction services in our country, we must consider elevating skills that transcend culture and human-made racial boundaries.
Published: June 17, 2020
Multimedia
The National CLAS Standards are intended to advance health equity, improve quality, and help eliminate health care disparities. This webinar will discuss how health care organizations need to ensure that awareness, adoption, and implementation of the National CLAS Standards are incorporated to have a more inclusive definition of culture in order to better serve persons living with HIV/AIDS. OBJECTIVES: Learn about quality and compassionate care services for persons living with HIV (PLWH) Discuss impact of stigma and discrimination on the overall wellness of PLWH Analyze emotional, physical and psychological needs of PLWH Explore trauma-informed principles and holistic health support Address behavioral health care and related HIV care services   PRESENTERS: Jacqueline Coleman, MEd, MSM, BA, CPC, certified professional coach with extensive experience as a senior program manager. Jacqueline has expertise in workforce development, organizational development and contract management. She is a cultivator and trainer of professionals in multiple sectors.  Jacqueline provides strategic consultation on LEADERVATION (gender-tailored programs, equity and diversity initiatives, and systems change processes).   Michelle Lopez, CASAC. BA, Healthy Aging Specialist at GMHC. Ms. Lopez serves the HIV Positive LGBT client population. Her services include individual mental health and substance use screenings, brief interventions, and referrals; and educational workshops relevant to the health of aging LGBT clients with HIV including physical, dental, and mental health. As a private consultant, Michelle was able to implement HIV care and services at a private primary care facility under the Medical Practice of Brooklyn Family Medical Center.
Published: June 17, 2020
Print Media
The Region 7 Mid-America Technology Transfer Centers (TTCs) recognize that Black communities in our country are hurting as the result of violence, bigotry and racism. Racism and discrimination are associated with dire behavioral and physical health issues, including depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and substance use disorders. We know that disparities in equitable access to services and resources perpetuate these issues. Across the Mid-America region, we commit to collectively increasing our efforts to develop a collaborative plan with our community partners to be part of a solution to promote equity, safety and health for our communities. As a start to our efforts to promote behavioral health equity for all, we have compiled some resources that may support you in your work. Download the document here.
Published: June 16, 2020
Multimedia
Dr. Haner Hernandez reflects on the 2018 National Recovery Month theme, Join the Voices for Recovery: Invest in Health, Home, Purpose, and Community, and offers recommendations on ways that treatment organizations can meet the needs of their Hispanic and Latino clients. 
Published: June 3, 2020
Multimedia
Dr. Tom Freese, co-director of the Pacific Southwest ATTC, shares insights on treatment and recovery in the LGBTQ population and offers recommendations on ways treatment organizations can meet the needs of their LGBTQ clients. 
Published: June 3, 2020
Multimedia
Our Recovery Month 2019 podcast features an interview with Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, a behavioral health trainer and consultant whose work has reached thousands across the United States and beyond. In this episode, Mark discusses the many pathways to recovery in the African American Community. 
Published: June 3, 2020
Multimedia
The Great Lakes Wave podcast channel is available on all of the top podcasting platforms, including Anchor, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, and Breaker. New episodes and podcast series are added regularly!  
Published: June 3, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
Monthly electronic newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.  
Published: May 27, 2020
Multimedia
The National CLAS Standards are intended to advance health equity, improve quality, and help eliminate health care disparities. This webinar will discuss how health care organizations need to ensure that awareness, adoption, and implementation of the National CLAS Standards are incorporated to have a more inclusive definition of culture in order to better serve transgender individuals. OBJECTIVES: Define CLAS standards, themes, and recommendations Understand strategies for addressing ‘real-life issues’ and health equity impact among transgender and intersex populations Learn about providing quality and compassionate care for adults, adolescents, and children who identify as transgender or gender-diverse or questioning their gender identity Explore gender minority stress treatment principles and support strategies Address behavioral health care and related CLAS standards for service to transgender and intersex populations   PRESENTERS: Jacqueline Coleman, MEd, MSM, BA, CPC, certified professional coach with extensive experience as a senior program manager. Jacqueline has expertise in workforce development, organizational development and contract management. She is a cultivator and trainer of professionals in multiple sectors.  Jacqueline provides strategic consultation on LEADERVATION (gender-tailored programs, equity and diversity initiatives, and systems change processes).   Brady Freitas, MSW, LCSW-C, ACHP-SW, is a clinical social worker specializing in palliative care at the University of Maryland’s Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center. He has extensive training in motivational interviewing, trauma-informed care and Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy. He provides LGBT cultural competency training for the cancer center staff and seeks to raise awareness for the importance of cancer screening amongst the Transgender population.
Published: March 25, 2020
Curriculum Package
This 5-part Curriculum Infusion Package (CIP) on Compassion Fatigue and the Behavioral Health Workforce was developed in 2020 by the Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center (PSATTC). The main developers included Nancy Roget, MS, Joyce Hartje, PhD, and Terra Hamblin, MA, with additional guidance and editing support provided by Beth Rutkowski, MPH, Thomas E. Freese, PhD, and Michael Shafer, PhD. The Compassion Fatigue CIP was created to help college and university faculty infuse brief, science-based content into existing substance use disorder-related course syllabi (e.g., foundation of addiction courses, ethics, counseling courses, etc.). Instructors can select the specific content to infuse throughout the duration of the course depending on specific needs of the learners. Each slide contains notes for the instructor to provide guidance as necessary. References are included for each slide and handouts when possible. Part 1 provides a brief overview of the behavioral health workforce and associated shortages, and introduces the demands on the workforce. Part 2 focuses on compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress. Part 3 provides a brief overview of how organizations can help individuals avoid experiencing burnout. Part 4 focuses on actions that behavioral health professionals can take to prevent compassion fatigue. And Part 5 focuses on self-care as an ethical duty in order to manage compassion fatigue.  The slide decks are designed to be used by academic faculty in behavioral health programs, trainers, behavioral health providers, and state/county agency staff members for a variety of audiences. If you require further information on this topic, please do not hesitate to contact the Pacific Southwest ATTC (http://www.psattc.org). You are free to use these slides and the pictures, but please give credit to the Pacific Southwest ATTC when using them by keeping the logo on each slide and referencing the Pacific Southwest ATTC at the beginning of your presentation. The Pacific Southwest ATTC (HHS Region 9) is part of the SAMHSA-funded ATTC network that offers training/technical assistance (TA) services through a partnership with UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, Arizona State University School of Social Work , and University of Nevada-Reno Center for the Application of Substance Abuse Technologies. HHS Region 9 is comprised of Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, and the six U.S.-affiliated Pacific Jurisdictions (American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and Republic of Palau). For additional information, please access its website at http://www.psattc.org.  
Published: March 20, 2020
Presentation Slides
Mid-America ATTC, in partnership with Truman Medical Center’s Center for Trauma-Informed Innovation (TIC in BH), is piloting an intensive technical assistance (TA) project with Osawatomie State Hospital (OSH) in Kansas. The goal of this project is to work closely with OSH leadership and staff to provide training and actively support a transformation in organizational culture to implement trauma-informed care (TIC) practices in all services.  Over the next year, the TIC in BH team will use the insights they glean from this intensive TA to finalize a TIC TA guide for TTC's and behavioral health providers.The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of the TIC TA guide.
Published: March 11, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
The March 2020 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: The Value of Social Work | Mental Health: Brain Awareness | Prevention: Substance Use Prevention and Preventing Problem Gambling | ORN: Partnering with Schools to Impact Addiction | Region 3 Spotlight: 185aDay and Mental Health and Intimacy. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox.
Published: March 3, 2020
Print Media
The Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC are pleased to offer a menu of intensive technical assistance options to help organizations build and enhance their skills in working with clients from diverse backgrounds. Download a summary of the training options here.  Published February 11, 2020
Published: February 11, 2020
Multimedia
African Americans have lower rates of retention in substance use disorder treatment. In this one-hour webinar, Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, provides an overview of the factors that prevent African Americans from continuing in treatment, along with strategies that organizations can apply to improve engagement.  Presentation Slides Presented on February 5, 2020. 
Published: February 7, 2020
Presentation Slides
African Americans have lower rates of retention in substance use disorder treatment than the general population. In this one-hour webinar, Mark Sanders, LCSW, CSC, presents an overview of the factors that prevent African Americans from engaging in treatment, along with strategies that treatment organizations can use to increase engagement.  Presented on February 5, 2020.  Download the presentation slides. 
Published: February 6, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
The January 2020 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: New Year. New Journey. | Mental Health: National Mentoring Month | Prevention: Prevention and Recovery | ORN: Compassion Fatigue | Region 3 Spotlight: Medicaid Innovation Accelerator Program. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 latest news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox.
Published: January 7, 2020
Print Media
  A series of educational products, guidance, and technical assistance for mental health providers, substance abuse treatment providers and primary care physicians who seek to elevate cultural competence efforts to include an understanding of the presence and impact of implicit racial bias in health care and substance abuse treatment. This pamphlet defines implicit racial bias and microaggression, and offers evidence-based strategies for addressing both substance use treatment programs.  
Published: December 16, 2019
Print Media
 A series of educational products, guidance, and technical assistance for mental health providers, substance abuse treatment providers and primary care physicians who seek to elevate cultural competence efforts to include an understanding of the presence and impact of implicit racial bias in health care and substance abuse treatment. This pamphlet describes the evolution of the term African-American, and provides insight and guidance on how to use this information to improve retention among African-American individuals being referred to and receiving substance abuse treatment.
Published: December 16, 2019
Print Media
A series of educational products, guidance, and technical assistance for mental health providers, substance abuse treatment providers and primary care physicians who seek to elevate cultural competence efforts to include an understanding of the presence and impact of implicit racial bias in health care and substance abuse treatment. This pamphlet describes the evolution of the term African-American, and provides insight and guidance on how to use this information to improve retention among African-American individuals receiving substance abuse treatment. 
Published: December 16, 2019
Print Media
Studies show that racial discrimination influences clinical decision-making and affects clinician-patient interactions.Implicit racial bias is associated with reduced trust in physicians, decreased likelihood to follow treatment recommendations and lower satisfaction with care received among African-American adults suffering from chronic disease.  Racial discrimination can play a foundational role in worsening African-American retention in substance abuse treatment by aggravating factors such as those listed below: • BARRIERS TO TREATMENT • LACK OF ACCESS TO NEEDED ANCILLARY SERVICES • LOW SATISFACTION WITH TREATMENT
Published: December 16, 2019
eNewsletter or Blog
The December 2019 Dialogue features: Addiction: Recovery During the Holiday Season | Mental Health: Supporting Student Mental Health | Prevention: Prevention During the Holiday Season | ORN: Family Peer Recovery Specialists | Region 3 Spotlight: Central East PTTC's A Prevention Guide to Improving Cultural Competency: A Literature Review. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox.
Published: December 3, 2019
Presentation Slides
The one-day workshop is designed to highlight and explore the needs of treatment professionals working with culturally diverse individuals, organizations, and communities.  The participants will learn about Health Disparities, Cultural Intelligence, CLAS Standards and proven techniques and strategies for engagement and improving outcomes.
Published: September 19, 2019
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The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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