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Multimedia
Stigma of substance use can impede appropriate and preventive care that is critical for older adults and their wellness. Biased perceptions of substance use can often dismiss health related impacts of substance use and impede prevention efforts with the aging community. The webinar will explore how stigma of substance use with older adults underscores the lack of screening and tailored prevention. Content will further inform and educate on age-related challenges that increase substance misuse, medication adherence, and person-centered brief intervention approaches. This training was approved for two renewal hours (CASAC, CPP, CPS) and two initial hours (CPP, CPS) through New York State’s Office of Addiction Services and Supports (NYS OASAS). As an IC & RC member board, OASAS accredited courses were granted reciprocal approval by the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee. Many other states offered reciprocity
Published: July 10, 2024
Multimedia
Presented by: Rebecca Rossom, MD, MS and Stephanie Hooker, PhD, MPH In this session, Drs. Rossom and Hooker discussed the design and implementation of Opioid Wizard, a clinical decision support tool embedded in the EHR for primary care clinicians and developed as part of NIDA Clinical Trials Network protocol CTN-0095. The goal of the tool is to help clinicians identify, screen, diagnose and treat opioid use disorder (OUD). They also discussed one of the supplements to CTN-0095, which tested a training to reduce stigma towards people with OUD among primary care clinicians. This session was sponsored by the Northwest and Pacific Southwest ATTCs and the Western States Node of the NIDA Clinical Trials Network. Download the slides | Watch the recording
Published: June 26, 2024
Print Media
The Invitation to Change (ITC) is a holistic helping model for families affected by substance use, drawing from concepts also found in CRAFT, MI, and ACT. Participants will leave the training with a complete set of tools for empowering families to support their loved ones effectively. More about the approach here. The deadline to apply is April 19, 2024. This training is a collaboration with the Great Lakes ATTC, South Southwest ATTC, Mountain Plains ATTC, Northwest ATTC, South Southeast ATTC, Mid America ATTC, and the ATTC Network Coordinating Office.
Published: April 2, 2024
Multimedia
  While men’s addiction and mental health treatment has been quite successful, there is great room for improvement. This new framework, developed by Mr. Griffin and colleagues, integrates the latest thinking on addiction and recovery, relational cultural theory, male psychological development, and trauma. Current treatment models and theories fail to adequately consider the relational needs of men; often omit a clear understanding of the impact of the socialization process on men; fall short of adequately addressing the impact of abuse and trauma that is so strongly linked with addiction and the life of the male addict; and often ignore any social context and/or the consequences of political, social, and economic power.     TRAINER:   Dan Griffin, MA, is an internationally recognized author, thought leader, and expert on men’s relationships and masculinity. Dan has dedicated his life and work to exploring and redefining what it means to be a man in the 21st century. He is committed to helping men be better men by understanding the impact of the Man Rules on their lives. Dan also helps men find the success in their personal lives they are striving for in their professional ones. Griffin’s books and curricula are all focused on helping men and dads live their best lives. Dan served as a senior fellow at The Meadows, world-renowned experts treating addictive disorders and trauma, from 2015 to 2017. Dan earned a Master’s degree in Sociology from the University of Kansas. For his graduate work, Dan completed the first qualitative study centered on the social construction of masculinity in the culture of Alcoholics Anonymous. Dan is in long-term recovery and lives with his family in Los Angeles   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: March 29, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
Dr. Nora Volkow is the Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health. Her research sheds light on one of the most important indicators that someone will or will not reach out for support for their substance use: stigma.[1] She states that: "The words we use to describe mental illnesses and substance use disorders (addiction to alcohol and other legal and illegal drugs) can impact the likelihood that people will seek help and the quality of the help they receive. Research indicates that stigma—negative attitudes toward people based on distinguishing characteristics—contributes in multiple ways to poorer health outcomes; consequently, it has been identified as a critical focus for research and interventions."[2] Addiction, along with mental health challenges, have long been some of the most stigmatized conditions. Countless research studies show that when there are stigmatizing attitudes, fewer people reach out for help. This is especially concerning considering the percentages of people who don’t receive the treatment they need (nearly 90% of the people who need support for their substance use challenges or addiction do not get it).[3] The Words We Use Matter How we talk about addiction and recovery matters. Not just because of the words we say, but because of the words we hear—and what our loved ones hear and in turn, can internalize. Research from 2019 shows that nearly 20% of people who needed help didn’t get it because they were concerned about what their neighbors or community would think.[4] There are things that we can do as loved ones to learn how to talk about addiction and also why this matters—and how it can help end addiction stigma. Understanding the science of addiction and recovery is a first step. You may be like me (not a neuroscientist) and that’s okay. There’s a way to understand what happens on a physical level when we experience substance use disorder or substance misuse challenges. Flo Hilliard, MSH, founding member of Faces & Voices of Recovery and expert in the field of addiction science explains it this way: "Many medical conditions, like Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular disease, are linked to not only a genetic predisposition but also to patterns or habits that can lead to "turning on" the gene for that condition. Substance use disorders often follow the same pattern, yet there is often stigma and shame attached to the normal progression of the medical condition. Understanding the basic brain science of addiction and recovery is a fundamental step in eliminating stigma and treating those suffering from this disorder as respected human beings. Research shows that with the proper treatment and support people can and do recover from addiction to alcohol and other drugs to have successful professional and personal lives." When we understand that addiction is a normal part of the human experience, it loses its ability to be framed as something requiring punitive measures. Something that causes shame. It lacks the power to divide into “us vs. them.” Addiction or substance use disorders are worthy of our understanding and compassion. There are some excellent resources out there, including ones through the ATTC network, including their Addiction Science Made Easy Series, that share information about the science of addiction and recovery so we not only understand it but understand how to talk about it. How We Talk About Addiction Recovery Matters There are simple ways that you can talk about addiction and recovery that decrease stigma. The National Institute on Drug Abuse or NIDA shares these helpful ways to talk about addiction recovery:[5],[6] Use person-first language Promote community education about addiction Share recovery stories Education programs for folks who work with those of us in or seeking recovery like doctors, nurses, treatment providers, counselors, and church leaders Here is another helpful resource from SAMHSA: Overcoming Stigma Ending Discrimination. Check out this helpful chart from NIDA: Words Matter - Terms to Use and Avoid When Talking About Addiction. Women and Addiction Stigma Stigma is even more prevalent for women, especially mothers, and women of color, and this has been known for decades.[7] It's part of why I founded and host the annual event with the SHE RECOVERS foundation that highlights and celebrates women’s recovery during Women’s History Month on International Women’s Day every year. This year, we are focusing on highlighting the next generation and why it’s important to not only share stories of recovery but also share what works in terms of recovery support services. Gathering as a global community of supporters of recovery is not only an incredible experience, it has a purpose: to help reduce the addiction recovery stigma that women face.[8] Since women, especially from under-resourced and underserved communities, experience higher levels of addiction stigma and are thus, less likely to seek support, we all must work to address this issue that impacts millions. When we share our stories of recovery in the light, it can illuminate hope for others and show that recovery is possible. When we use supportive and hope-filled language, we can be a part of eradicating the stigma and discrimination that has no place in our recovery-oriented world today. Join us this March and celebrate. For more information and to register for free visit: https://sherecovers.org/international-womens-day-2024/ Time and date don’t work for you? No problem! Register for a link to watch on demand any time or plan your own watch party.   Caroline Beidler, MSW is an author, recovery advocate, and founder of the storytelling platform Circle of Chairs. With almost 20 years in leadership within social work and ministry, she is currently a consultant with JBS International, along with the founder and host of the annual International Women’s Day Global Recovery Event presented by the SHE RECOVERS Foundation. Connect with her @carolinebeidler_official and  https://www.facebook.com/carolinebeidlermsw   [1] Volkow, N.D., Gordon, J.A. & Koob, G.F. Choosing appropriate language to reduce the stigma around mental illness and substance use disorders. Neuropsychopharmacol. 46, 2230–2232 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-021-01069-4 [2] National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Ending Discrimination Against People with Mental and Substance Use Disorders: the Evidence for Stigma Change. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2016. https://doi.org/10.17226/23442. [3] Hammarlund R, Crapanzano KA, Luce L, Mulligan L, Ward KM. Review of the effects of self-stigma and perceived social stigma on the treatment-seeking decisions of individuals with drug- and alcohol-use disorders. Subst Abus Rehabil. 2018;9:115–36. https://doi.org/10.2147/SAR.S183256. Published 2018 Nov 23. [4] Han B. Key substance use and mental health indicators in the United States: results from the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (HHS Publication No. PEP20-07-01-001, NSDUH Series H-55). Rockville, MD: Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; 2020. [5] Volkow, N.D., Gordon, J.A. & Koob, G.F. Choosing appropriate language to reduce the stigma around mental illness and substance use disorders. Neuropsychopharmacol. 46, 2230–2232 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-021-01069-4 [6] Livingston, J. D., Milne, T., Fang, M. L., & Amari, E. (2012). The effectiveness of interventions for reducing stigma related to substance use disorders: a systematic review. Addiction (Abingdon, England), 107(1), 39–50. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2011.03601.x [7] Radcliffe P. Motherhood, Pregnancy, and the Negotiation of Identity: The Moral Career of Drug Treatment. Social Science & Medicine. 2011;72:984–991. [8] Page, S., Fedorowicz, S., McCormack, F., Whitehead, S. (2024). Women, Addictions, Mental Health, Dishonesty, and Crime Stigma: Solutions to Reduce the Social Harms of Stigma. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 21(1):63. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21010063
Published: March 5, 2024
Multimedia
    In this virtual panel presentation, the 2024 Hall of Fame Award Recipients from the Museum of African American Addictions, Treatment, and Recovery will participate in a panel presentation discussing the importance of providing culturally-responsive care and ways practitioners can be more effective when working with African American clients.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By the end of this presentation, you will be able to: Work more effectively with African American clients Better provide cross-cultural care when working with African American clients Be guided by research on best practices when providing culturally-responsive care in your work with African American clients Articulate effective harm reduction strategies for African Americans with substance use disorders     PANELISTS:    Corrie Vilsaint, PhD Dr. Vilsaint is the associate director of recovery health equity at the Recovery Research Institute and an instructor at Harvard Medical School. Her research focuses on addiction recovery capital, reducing discrimination among individuals in recovery, and racial health equity in remission and recovery. Dr. Vilsaint’s research is supported by the National Institute of Drug Abuse and the National Institute on Alcohol abuse and Alcoholism, and her work as a community psychologist has been awarded by the American Psychological Association.     Fred Dyer, PhD, LADC Dr. Dyer is a practitioner, presenter, consultant, and writer specializing in providing culturally responsive treatment for African American adolescents, emerging adults, and emerging adult refugees. Dr. Dyer has over 100 scholarly publications on the treatment of mental health, substance use disorders, and co-occurring disorders for African American adolescents and emerging adults. He is also the executive director of Hope Recovery Center and a recipient of the key to the city for Laurel, Mississippi—an honor award to him by the city’s mayor in recognition of his innovative consultations and trainings on culturally responsive services for African American teenage girls in the justice system.     Chyrell Bellamy, PhD, MSW Dr. Bellamy is a professor at Yale University's Department of Psychiatry, and she also serves as director of the Yale Program for Recovery and Community Health, director of the Peer Support Services and Research, director of the Yale Lived Experience Transformational Leadership Academy, director of the Yale Program for Recovery and Community Health. Dr. Bellamy also co-designs and conducts community-based participatory research with communities of color and people living with psychiatric Illness, substance use disorders, HIV, homelessness, and incarceration histories. Her research also focuses on healthcare disparities, sociocultural pathways of recovery, and the development of culturally responsive interventions.   Representative La Shawn Ford Representative Ford is the representative of the 8th District of Illinois. He is founder of The Westside Heroin and Opioid Taskforce which serves as an innovative strategic model for creating recovery-oriented systems of care in underserved communities across the nation. The taskforce has mobilized over 33 organizations to work together in the community to reduce overdose and promote recovery on the west side of Chicago. These partners include persons with lived experience; the formerly incarcerated; recovery community organizations, substance use disorders and mental health treatment providers; mobile treatment providers; hospitals; and harm reduction specialists. Last year, the taskforce's work resulted in 2,000 fewer emergency calls for overdose thanks to the training it provided to over 3,300 community residents on the distribution and use of Narcan. The Westside Heroin and Opioid Taskforce was awarded the winner of the 2023 SAMHSA Behavioral Health Equity Challenge. Thanks to his dedicated service and contributions to the behavioral healthcare field, Representative Ford was named as the recipient of the Illinois Chapter of NAADAC's Advocate of the Year award and the Nelson Mandela Award for Justice.    Dr. Felecia Pullen Dr. Pullen is a qualitative researcher exploring structural racism's impact on attaining recovery capital for people of color with histories of drug use. Her research has resulted in the creation of MRCAT, an assessment tool for professionals who develop recovery plans in partnership with clients. Dr. Pullen is also the president and CEO of three organizations: Let's Talk Safety, a not-for profit teen led prevention program; The Pillars, Manhattan's first OASIS-funded recovery community and outreach center; and The SAFETY Net, a teen-designed club house in Harlem. Dr. Pullen's policy advocacy and activism has been widely recognized. She has also delivered numerous workshops on culturally responsive recovery.         MODERATORS:   Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC Mark Sanders is the Illinois state project manager for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC and PTTC. He is an international speaker and behavioral health consultant whose presentations and publications have reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, West Indies, Lithuania, and Guam. Mark is the recipient of four lifetime achievement awards, including NAADAC’s prestigious Enlightenment Award, the National Association for Addiction Professionals’ 50th Anniversary Legends Award, the Illinois Certification Board's Professional of the Year Award and Jessica Hayes Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Barbara Bacon Award for outstanding contributions to the social work profession as an alumnus of Loyola University of Chicago.    Kisha Freed, BA Kisha serves as an outreach program coordinator with CHESS BHE-TAC and has co-authored multiple blog series with Mark Sanders for the Great Lakes ATTC’s Counselors Corner blog. She is a certified professional coach with a special emphasis in emotional intelligence and mindful leadership. Utilizing her Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Alabama-Birmingham, Kisha has worked in her community helping people to get in touch with suppressed emotions through the creative arts, such as poetry writing, storytelling and hip hop and emotional intelligence online workshops. She is also an event host, public speaker, and performing spoken word poetry. She resides in Huntsville, AL with her two sons and two-year old granddaughter.     The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: February 13, 2024
Multimedia
Each person who enters recovery is as unique as their story. And this month, in honor of recovery month, we are bringing you recovery stories from people in diverse populations. Hear what people in these communities want providers to know. Episode 5: Lisa got sober at fifteen, and now, at 34 people often discount her experience.  Lisa has many labels: a person in recovery, a queer lesbian, multi-religious, and a single mom who created her family through international adoption. She continues to work on her recovery daily and is grateful to be sober.    
Published: October 5, 2023
Multimedia
Each person who enters recovery is as unique as their story. And this month, in honor of recovery month, we are bringing you recovery stories from people in diverse populations. Hear what people in these communities want providers to know. Bonus Episode: Norma is an 88-year-old woman who entered recovery in her 50’s. As an older lady friends and family have a hard time believing she ever had a drinking problem. She educates her doctors and friends about what alcoholism is.    
Published: October 5, 2023
Multimedia
Each person who enters recovery is as unique as their story. And this month, in honor of recovery month, we are bringing you recovery stories from people in diverse populations. Hear what people in these communities want providers to know. Episode 4: Jazie is a non-binary person who is coming up on their 2nd sober anniversary. Jazie recognizes the older version of themselves taught them many things and acknowledges that they would not be the best version of themselves without that former self.    
Published: September 21, 2023
Multimedia
Each person who enters recovery is as unique as their story. And this month, in honor of recovery month, we are bringing you recovery stories from people in diverse populations. Hear what people in these communities want providers to know. Episode 3: Casey explains that recovery does not have to be abstinence only.  She discusses her thoughts on why she practices abstinence only now, but she may not always. She discusses why she may use substances in spiritual practices or rituals that her culture has used for centuries, and that does not contradict being in recovery. Casey uses her voice to stand up for who she stands on.     
Published: September 21, 2023
Multimedia
Each person who enters recovery is as unique as their story. And this month, in honor of recovery month, we are bringing you recovery stories from people in diverse populations. Hear what people in these communities want providers to know.   Episode 1: Laura celebrates her recovery and the person she has become as a result. When her daughter was battling her own addiction, this veteran, divorced, gay mom had to advocate to get her daughter's other mom to be recognized in the healthcare setting.  Laura and her ex-partner were the first parents in MO to have a same-sex partner adoption, but even that legal distinction did not stop the discrimination this queer family faced when seeking medical care for their daughter.      
Published: September 7, 2023
Multimedia
Each person who enters recovery is as unique as their story. And this month, in honor of recovery month, we are bringing you recovery stories from people in diverse populations. Hear what people in these communities want providers to know. Episode 2: Hector looked at his family and chose not to repeat those patterns.  Hector practiced abstinence into his young adulthood.  When he did start using, he practiced harm reduction.  As a queer, first-generation Hispanic immigrant, he has been able to put a voice to what so many in his culture could not do.    
Published: September 7, 2023
Print Media
This snapshot of information is intended to inform individuals, parents, professionals, and providers of how the stigma around Substance Use Disorder (SUD) impacts Hispanic & Latino populations in the US. Español - Discapacidad y Trastornopor Uso de Sustancias (TUS) El propósito de esta reseña informativa es informar a las personas, padres, profesionales y proveedores sobre como el estigma en torno a los Trastornos por el Uso de Sustancias (TUS) afecta a las poblaciones Hispanas y Latinas en los EE.UU.
Published: June 9, 2023
Multimedia
CRTIC: Pour a Cup of Tea and Sit With It    Episode 4, with Erika Holliday and Lauren Ragan Wilkerson   This episode features Erika Holliday, Substance Use Coordinator for the Unified Government (Kansas City, KS) Public Health Department, and Lauren Ragan Wilkerson, Board-Certified Music Therapist at the University of California-San Francisco Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland. In this conversation, we challenged ourselves with questions that rarely have clear answers, and our guests offered both macro- and micro-level strategies for effecting change and maintaining well-being through it.  
Published: May 5, 2023
Toolkit
A toolkit for behavioral health prevention and treatment providers, recovery community organizations, and individuals in recovery with practical information and tools to enhance their capacity to engage in effective stigma reduction efforts. This guide provides practical information about a variety of approaches to prevent and mitigate behavioral health-related stigma. Some approaches are straightforward and can be initiated by individuals on their own. These approaches include tips on using stigma-free, positive person-first language and writing letters to the editor. Some approaches are comprehensive, such as developing a community action group and implementing a community-based messaging and media campaign. The revision of this toolkit was made in collaboration with the Central East MHTTC and the Central East PTTC.
Published: March 3, 2023
Multimedia
Presenters: Ashton Marra and Jonathan Stoltman, Co-Directors of ReportingOnAddiction.org January 2023 Mainstream media perpetuates many problematic narratives about drug use and addiction that increase stigma, discrimination, and bad policy. One way to address these shortcomings is to increase the coverage of evidence-based approaches to addiction treatment and recovery. To do this, we need bridges between subject matter experts and the media. However, many experts are not trained to interact with journalists in today’s media environment. Thus, this workshop is designed to offer customized training to support interactions between the addiction workforce and the media. Topics covered include preparing for interviews and how to pitch ideas/op-eds to the media. Download slides | Watch recording
Published: January 26, 2023
Multimedia
In today’s video, we would like to discuss harm reduction and its importance and break down some of the stigma often associated with this topic.     Español  La reducción de daño En el video de hoy, vamos a platicar sobre la reducción de daño y su importancia al igual que desbaratar el estigma que comúnmente acompaña a este tema     Português Redução de danos No vídeo de hoje, gostaríamos de discutir a redução de danos, sua importância e quebrar um pouco do estigma frequentemente associado a esse tópico.
Published: August 16, 2022
Multimedia
The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.   Alcohol is STILL a Drug: An Exploratory Webinar Series (August 2, 2022) Recording       DESCRIPTION  Alcohol is STILL a drug.  The opioid crisis, increase in stimulant misuse, and marijuana legalization dominate the news— yet alcohol remains the number one substance causing health, social, legal and financial problems throughout the US.  While this series will focus on the hopefulness of recovery from alcohol use disorder, we’ll also take a deep dive into what we know about the full impact of alcohol overuse and the ways it affects every person in the US.     SERIES LEARNING OBJECTIVES These are the overall learning objectives for the full 10-session series:  Summarize the current impacts of problematic alcohol use in various/special populations, including pregnant women, youth, rural, and minority populations.  Assess and prioritize alcohol reduction efforts in targeted settings.  Describe the current efforts to curb problematic alcohol use, including best practices in providing treatment.      PRESENTER Kris Kelly, BS Kris Kelly is a project manager for the Great Lakes Addiction, Mental Health, and Prevention Technology Transfer Centers, a woman in long-term recovery, and subject matter expert on peer-based recovery support services. Kris is also leads the Recovery Community Organization Capacity Building core area for the Peer Recovery Center of Excellence. She has worked with state and local government, recovery community organizations, treatment courts, withdrawal management/detoxification, and clinical treatment developing best practices for integrating recovery supports into systems and services. As a former executive director and director of programs of a Minnesota-based recovery community organization, Kelly is a leader in the peer support movement in Minnesota. Kelly has presented at state and national conferences on topics ranging from supervision in peer-based recovery support services and integrating peer support services into behavioral health organizations to recovery-oriented systems of care.  
Published: August 2, 2022
Curriculum Package
  SUD Keys to Education is a product for educators and clinical supervisors developed in 2022 by the Mountain Plains and Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (MPATTC and PSATTC). This product was developed to help community college/university faculty, as well as clinical supervisors and recovery support staff to have access to brief, science-based content with the goal of providing materials that can be easily infused into existing substance use disorder and related courses (e.g., social work, nursing, criminal justice, foundation of addiction courses, ethics, counseling courses, etc.) and for clinical and recovery staff use in in-service meetings. Individuals can select the specific content to infuse into existing curricula/materials depending on specific needs of their learners. Each slide in the slide decks contain notes to provide guidance on the topics along with references and handouts where appropriate. All of the stimulant-specific slide decks also have a video (MP4) of the content narrated by subject matter experts as an alternative way of presenting the materials. The main developers of the SUD Keys are: MPATTC, HHS Region 8: Cindy Juntenen, PhD, LP, Nancy Roget, MS, Trisha Dudkowski, BA, Kenneth Flanagan, PhD, Terra Hamblin, MA, Shannon McCarty, BS, Kim Miller, MS, Abby Roach-Moore, MSW, and Maridee Shogren, DNP PSATTC, HHS Region 9: Thomas E. Freese, PhD, and Beth Rutkowski, MPH.  
Published: July 27, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The July 2022 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Construction Work and Opioids | Mental Health: Mental Health in the BIPOC Community | Prevention: BIPOC Mental Health Month | ORN: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. Additional sections include behavioral health observances, virtual training and webinar events, Region 3 news, new resources, and Regional Spotlight: PPW Addiction Treatment Center – Claymont Center for Pregnant & Parenting Women. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected]. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox. Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: July 12, 2022
Multimedia
The Mountain Plains and Pacific Southwest ATTCs are pleased to offer a two-part recording focused on recovery support services as it relates to People With Stimulant Use Disorders (PWSUDs). In both recordings, a review of the current research is highlighted along with people with lived experience in stimulant use and recovery discussing the findings and relating it to their own experiences. The three panelists with lived experience, all currently work at well-established recovery community organizations (RCOs), one in Colorado- Advocates for Recovery and one in Utah- Utah Support Advocates for Recovery Awareness.  In Part 1 recovery support (e.g. definition of recovery, recovery capital, recovery benchmarks, etc.) and stimulant use (e.g., prevalence of use, impact on the brain, and craving) is discussed. While the Part 2 recording is focused on treatment and recovery services (e.g., treatment services, barriers to recovery, managing triggers and return to use, cessation triggers, 12 Step involvement, exercise, and involvement with RCOs). The overall goal of this two-part recording is to provide participants with a review of the latest science regarding stimulants within the context of people with lived experience highlighting the lessons learned from their recovery. Finally, promoting hope, community, and engagement as central/essential pieces to recovery from stimulant use disorders is a theme in both recordings with the panelists reinforcing that recovery is achievable for PWSUDs.   Recovery Support with Stimulant Use Disorders Part 1   Recovery Support with Stimulant Use Disorders Part 2        
Published: June 21, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The March 2022 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Consequences of Stigma | Mental Health: Older Americans and Mental Health | Prevention: National Prevention Week | ORN: Prevention Is Important | Regional Spotlight: The Tides that Bink, Inc. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated bi-monthly on the first Tuesday. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter, [email protected]. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox. Visit the Dialogue Archives.
Published: May 5, 2022
Print Media
The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on March 09, 2022 from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM. This discussion reviewed the article, “Hoots and harm reduction: a qualitative study identifying gaps in overdose prevention among women who smoke drugs.”  View the March 2022 RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: March 17, 2022
Multimedia
  Presenter: John Kelly, PhD, ABPP, Harvard University The goal of this webinar series from the CTN Western States Node and the Northwest and Pacific Southwest ATTCs is to help scholars and clinicians in the addiction field stay abreast of cutting edge science. In this session, John Kelly, PhD, ABPP of Harvard University discussed the fundamental causes of stigma and discrimination in relation to substance use disorder, reviewed some of the paradoxical findings from the latest stigma research, and suggested how stigma and discrimination might be more systematically addressed to enhance the clinical care and outcomes of individuals suffering from substance use disorder. Download slides | View recording    
Published: October 28, 2021
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The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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