You are visiting us from Virginia. You are located in HHS Region 3. Your Center is Central East ATTC.

Products and Resources Catalog

Center
Product Type
Target Audience
Language
Keywords
Date Range
Multimedia
Presented By: Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC Recorded on June 23, 2020  |  Module 7/8
Published: July 14, 2020
Multimedia
Presented By: Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC Recorded on June 30, 2020  |  Module 8/8
Published: July 14, 2020
Print Media
This workshop is designed to highlight and explore the needs of substance use treatment professionals working with culturally diverse individuals, organizations, and communities.  The participants will be able to understand the role cultural competency in clinical settings and will learn proven techniques and strategies for engagement.  The training includes didactic as well as interactive exercises designed to engage participants and elicit their input.  The training is intended for entry to advanced level.
Published: June 18, 2020
Multimedia
This is a conversation in Motivational Interviewing,(MI), to illustrate the power of one person in the lives of the people we serve. During this healthcare crisis, providers are transmitting all the goodness conveyed to them in their lives by influential people and experiences. The evidence of one harsh comment can undo a person's sense of exploration and connection to creative problem solving. Today, we will make a choice in how we want to be memorable in the workplace. Motivational Interviewing awakens one's inner sense of purpose and enthusiasm for the hard work being done during this health care crisis. Objectives: Describe the characteristics of influential people; Become aware of compassionate listening and its impact on suffering; and Discuss the impact of difficult judgement of others
Published: June 18, 2020
Print Media
The Region 7 Mid-America Technology Transfer Centers (TTCs) recognize that Black communities in our country are hurting as the result of violence, bigotry and racism. Racism and discrimination are associated with dire behavioral and physical health issues, including depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and substance use disorders. We know that disparities in equitable access to services and resources perpetuate these issues. Across the Mid-America region, we commit to collectively increasing our efforts to develop a collaborative plan with our community partners to be part of a solution to promote equity, safety and health for our communities. As a start to our efforts to promote behavioral health equity for all, we have compiled some resources that may support you in your work. Download the document here.
Published: June 16, 2020
Multimedia
Contingency management (CM) is an effective behavioral intervention that provides tangible reinforcement when target behaviors are completed and objectively verified. A large body of literature supports the use of CM for the treatment of persons with substance use disorders (SUDs). Many applications of CM in treating SUDs focus on abstinence, providing monetary rewards or prizes when clients provide objective evidence of abstinence from drugs (e.g., urine samples). Contingency management has also been adapted successfully to reinforce other behaviors, including treatment attendance, medication adherence, and treatment-related activities (e.g., submitting job applications, attending medical appointments). Despite this strong empirical foundation, CM has only been widely disseminated within large self-contained healthcare systems (e.g., Veterans Affairs).  This workshop will review the application of CM to promote positive behavior change in substance use disorder treatment settings.  Attendees will learn how to design and implement an effective CM program. Specifically, 1) the theoretical underpinnings and supporting empirical literature, 2) different types of CM programs (i.e., voucher, prize), 3) effective design features, 4) most common deviations from evidence-based protocols and how to avoid them, 5) common barriers, 6) how to calculate costs of delivering CM incentives themselves and 7) strategies for designing your own protocol. After the webinar, participants will be able to understand CM theory and the supporting empirical literature; recognize different types of CM programs; recognize effective  features of CM Interventions and reinforcement schedules; and understand common deviations from evidence-based protocols and how to avoid them.
Published: June 12, 2020
Multimedia
This Recovery Month 2019 podcast features an interview with Dr. Mike Flaherty, a clinical psychologist with more than 30 years' experience in prevention, intervention, treatment, research, and policy development related to substance use treatment and recovery. In this episode, Dr. Flaherty provides an overview of Recovery-Oriented Systems of Care.   
Published: June 3, 2020
Interactive Resource
This document entitled “Stimulant Resources” provides a list of resources for SUD providers including facts and statistics, resources for teens, online trainings and recorded webinars, and recent data specific to stimulant use disorders.
Published: May 21, 2020
Multimedia
This second session will go into detail about newborn opioid withdrawal, how the presentation may differ from other substance exposures, and the impact of poly-substance exposure. We will discuss care and treatment of the newborn after delivery and the potential impact on longer-term outcomes.
Published: May 1, 2020
Multimedia
Additional Resources Presentation Slides This webinar addresses what constitutes an “evidence-based treatment (EBT)” and an “evidence-based practice (EBP),” the difference between efficacy and effectiveness, and what we need to know about them in order to make more informed decisions in selecting EBTs and EBPs that are best suited to our agencies or clinics. Major concepts underlying EBTs will be discussed: 1) treatment integrity/fidelity, 2) external validity/generalizability, 3) operational definitions, and 4) statistically vs. clinically significant results. Factors related to the application of EBTs/EBP to culturally diverse populations will be examined: 1) samples on which EBTs are based, 2) use of ethnic vs. cultural groups, 3) “generic” vs. culturally specific EBTs, 4) cultural content vs. cultural context, 5) advantages and disadvantages of culturally adapted EBT, and 6) sustainability of EBTs/EBP. The webinar will present the contribution of meta-analyses to EBTs, the EBTs in the context of the factors that contribute to change in interventions (e.g., therapy relationship and client contribution), limitations of EBTs, common elements of EBTs, and the role of politics, power, and privilege in the scientific study of treatment outcome. Processual issues critical to moving from EBTs to EBP will be discussed. The webinar will describe alternative approaches to EBTs/EBP, such as those grounded on practice-based evidence and community-based evidence or those considered “promising practices,” and alternative concepts to external validity (generalizability), such as ecological validity and social validity. About the Presenter Luis A. Vargas, PhD Luis A. Vargas is a retired clinical psychologist and a member of the Board of Directors of the National Latino Behavioral Health Association. He was on the staff and faculty of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine (UNM-SOM) for 30 years. He worked part-time at Samaritan Counseling Center and its Spanish-speaking clinic, St. Joseph’s Center for Children and Families, following his retirement from UNM . He was the director of the UNM-SOM clinical psychology internship program for fourteen years and served six years as the Chair of the New Mexico Board of Psychologist Examiners. His clinical and scholarly work has focused on providing culturally responsive services to diverse children, adolescents, and families in Latino communities. He is committed to training mental health professionals to maintain a scientific mindedness in providing culturally responsive services in the context of evidence-based practice and global psychology.
Published: April 29, 2020
Multimedia
This comprehensive online course, developed by the Northwest ATTC, features separate modules for each of four common personnel roles in healthcare organizations: decision-makers, clinical supervisors, direct care staff, and administrative support staff. Healthcare organizations may utilize these training modules as means of an initial introduction to CM principles and practices for their staff; however, the primary intent of this online course is as a bridge to more intensive technical assistance—as outlined by Hartzler and colleagues in this article in the Journal of Substance Use and Addiction Treatment (2023) (free online). All four modules include an introduction to contingency management (CM) describing: its core elements, 3 scientifically-supported systems, how it can be used in healthcare settings to have a positive impact on clients.   Each module also offers unique content on how each role can successfully integrate CM into their program.  Note: The Administrative Support Staff module is currently available here. It will be added to HealtheKnowledge (along with 1.0 CE credit) later in spring 2023. CEU Available! 1.0 Decision Makers, 2.5 Clinical Supervisors, 2.0 Direct Care Staff.  In response to SAMHSA instruction provided to State Opioid Response grantees (in FY 22 SOR Grants TI-22-005, Appendix J: Contingency Management), a set of four supplemental brief information guides have been created on targeted topics to complement the material included in this online course. These information guides provide further information on: Discussing Client Eligibility, Allowable Rewards, Drug Screening Methods, and Documentation Practices. (*Note:  The View Resource link will take you to the HealtheKnowledge platform, where the training is housed. If you do not already have an account on HealtheKnowledge, you will be prompted to set one up before you can continue on to the course site. If you register and it doesn't take you back to the course page, click "Home" in the menu and look for it under the category "Special Topics in Behavioral Health" or return to this page and click the link again. For more assistance, visit the How to Use HealtheKnowledge site or contact their support staff.)
Published: April 3, 2020
Presentation Slides
Mid-America ATTC, in partnership with Truman Medical Center’s Center for Trauma-Informed Innovation (TIC in BH), is piloting an intensive technical assistance (TA) project with Osawatomie State Hospital (OSH) in Kansas. The goal of this project is to work closely with OSH leadership and staff to provide training and actively support a transformation in organizational culture to implement trauma-informed care (TIC) practices in all services.  Over the next year, the TIC in BH team will use the insights they glean from this intensive TA to finalize a TIC TA guide for TTC's and behavioral health providers.The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of the TIC TA guide.
Published: March 11, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
Electronic newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   
Published: March 3, 2020
Multimedia
In this webinar in February 2020, Dr. Robrina Walker, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, described trends in the use of methamphetamine, presented about evidence-based treatments for methamphetamine use disorder, and summarized current research investigating new treatments for methamphetamine use disorder. This event was co-sponsored by the Western States Node of the NIDA Clinical Trials Network. Download slides | Watch recording
Published: February 25, 2020
Multimedia
Translations     --This was Part 2 of a 2-Part Webinar Series-- This presentation engaged participants in strategizing ways we as helping professionals can support continued healing, resilience and resistance within the Latinx communities we serve. This presentation explored racial battle fatigue, spotlighting and other workplace forms of oppression that impede our long-term engagement in this work. A final outcome was for participants to end this workshop with a plan for radical self-care and critical allyship to promote our well-being as helping professionals and sustain us in this work. Spanning two decades of research, trauma-informed (T-I) practice is seen as a new frontier in behavioral health and social services (National Council for Behavioral Health, n.d.), but more is needed to honor culturally-grounded sources for resilience and resistance when healing from substance use for Latinx individuals and communities. Building on the Critical Trauma model that addresses the role of oppression-based trauma in substance use and the unique, culturally-rooted resilience and resistance characteristics for Latinx, this presentation proposed a set of culturally sustaining practices in treating individuals impacted by substance use. Speaker Anna Nelson, LCSW College Assistant Professor @NMSU School of Social Work An educator for the previous decade and helping professional since 1996, Anna Nelson, LCSW, is a College Assistant Professor with NMSU School of Social Work and a Ph.D. Candidate in Educational Leadership and Administration. Ms. Nelson employs mixed-methods participatory action research grounded in Critical Race and Intersectionality theories to understand cultural, cumulative and collective trauma and its impact on communities with a strong focus on identity-driven resilience and resistance. From 2010- 2016, she served as Executive Director of the New Mexico Forum for Youth in Community, a statewide network intermediary that promoted racial, health, academic and economic justice for all youth statewide. Her professional practice emphases are youth, family and community engagement, violence prevention, trauma/healing informed culturally sustaining service systems development, and policy transformation, particularly for child welfare and juvenile justice systems.
Published: January 8, 2020
Print Media
A series of educational products, guidance, and technical assistance for mental health providers, substance abuse treatment providers and primary care physicians who seek to elevate cultural competence efforts to include an understanding of the presence and impact of implicit racial bias in health care and substance abuse treatment. This pamphlet focuses on evidence-based interventions that have been demonstrated to reduce the negative impact of implicit bias on healthcare outcomes. Systemic, organizational, and individual perspectives are presented.
Published: December 16, 2019
Print Media
A series of educational products, guidance, and technical assistance for mental health providers, substance abuse treatment providers and primary care physicians who seek to elevate cultural competence efforts to include an understanding of the presence and impact of implicit racial bias in health care and substance abuse treatment.  This pamphlet focuses on evidence-based strategies that have been demonstrated to reduce the negative impact of implicit bias on healthcare outcomes. Systemic, organizational, and individual perspectives are presented.
Published: December 16, 2019
Print Media
  A series of educational products, guidance, and technical assistance for mental health providers, substance abuse treatment providers and primary care physicians who seek to elevate cultural competence efforts to include an understanding of the presence and impact of implicit racial bias in health care and substance abuse treatment. This pamphlet describes the scope and impact of implicit racial bias in healthcare and substance abuse treatment.
Published: December 16, 2019
eNewsletter or Blog
Monthly electronic newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.  Features news stories, upcoming events, and new products the Great Lakes programs. Also features updates from SAMHSA and the ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC Network Coordinating Offices. 
Published: November 14, 2019
Multimedia
Safe, stable, and affordable housing is increasingly recognized as a vital part of recovery. What role can substance use disorder treatment and recovery programs play in providing this essential need for their clients? Find out the basics of housing and how to get started in this 6-session virtual learning community series! By the end of session 6, participants will be able to: By the end of the session, participants will be able to: 1.  Describe the importance of beginning with the end in mind in housing development. 2.  Identify how the impact of housing development can be measured. 3.  Evaluate the first steps your agency can take toward housing development. This series is a collaboration among the HHS Region 7  Technology Transfer Centers (Mid-America Addiction Technology Transfer Center [ATTC], Prevention Technology Transfer Center [PTTC], and Mental Health Technology Transfer Center [MHTTC]).
Published: November 7, 2019
Multimedia
Safe, stable, and affordable housing is increasingly recognized as a vital part of recovery. What role can substance use disorder treatment and recovery programs play in providing this essential need for their clients? Find out the basics of housing and how to get started in this 6-session virtual learning community series! By the end of session 5, participants will be able to: 1. Understand the economic argument for housing as an intervention. 2. Describe landlord law and its relevance to housing development. 3. Identify the breadth of funding sources available for housing. This series is a collaboration among the HHS Region 7  Technology Transfer Centers (Mid-America Addiction Technology Transfer Center [ATTC], Prevention Technology Transfer Center [PTTC], and Mental Health Technology Transfer Center [MHTTC]).
Published: October 31, 2019
Multimedia
Safe, stable, and affordable housing is increasingly recognized as a vital part of recovery. What role can substance use disorder treatment and recovery programs play in providing this essential need for their clients? Find out the basics of housing and how to get started in this 6-session virtual learning community series! By the end of session 4, participants will be able to: 1. Identify at least three alternative housing types. 2. Compare the pros and cons of different alternative housing types. 3. Describe how alternative housing types benefit clients and the community. This series is a collaboration among the HHS Region 7  Technology Transfer Centers (Mid-America Addiction Technology Transfer Center [ATTC], Prevention Technology Transfer Center [PTTC], and Mental Health Technology Transfer Center [MHTTC]).
Published: October 11, 2019
Multimedia
Safe, stable, and affordable housing is increasingly recognized as a vital part of recovery. What role can substance use disorder treatment and recovery programs play in providing this essential need for their clients? Find out the basics of housing and how to get started in this 6-session virtual learning community series! By the end of session 3, participants will be able to: Understand the history of inequality in the housing system. Discuss special considerations in supportive housing for people experiencing homelessness, veterans, people with severe mental health issues, and older adults. Determine key stakeholders to collaborate with in supportive housing for people experiencing homelessness, veterans, people with severe mental health issues, and older adults. This series is a collaboration among the HHS Region 7  Technology Transfer Centers (Mid-America Addiction Technology Transfer Center [ATTC], Prevention Technology Transfer Center [PTTC], and Mental Health Technology Transfer Center [MHTTC]).
Published: October 2, 2019
Print Media
Exploring Models for the Implementation of Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder: Knowledge and Application At state and local levels, agencies have expressed a dire need for increased access to OUD treatment to encourage individuals to enter long-term recovery. Developed by the ATTC Network CLAS Standards Workgroup, this factsheet provides concise, practical guidance to facilitate decision-making for MAT expansion. It builds on the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) technical brief titled Medication-Assisted Treatment Models of Care for Opioid Use Disorder. This AHRQ technical brief describes background and research for promising and innovative MAT models in primary care settings; it provides an overview of the models and identifies gaps in the evidence base.    
Published: September 26, 2019
1 2 3 4 5 9

The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

map-markermagnifiercrossmenuchevron-down