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Products and Resources Catalog

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eNewsletter or Blog
Great Lakes Current January 2020  Monthly e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. 
Published: August 10, 2020
Print Media
This document provides clinicians/counselors useful tips based on guidelines for delivering services virtually.  
Published: July 10, 2020
Print Media
This workshop is designed to highlight and explore the needs of substance use treatment professionals working with culturally diverse individuals, organizations, and communities.  The participants will be able to understand the role cultural competency in clinical settings and will learn proven techniques and strategies for engagement.  The training includes didactic as well as interactive exercises designed to engage participants and elicit their input.  The training is intended for entry to advanced level.
Published: June 18, 2020
Multimedia
This is a conversation in Motivational Interviewing,(MI), to illustrate the power of one person in the lives of the people we serve. During this healthcare crisis, providers are transmitting all the goodness conveyed to them in their lives by influential people and experiences. The evidence of one harsh comment can undo a person's sense of exploration and connection to creative problem solving. Today, we will make a choice in how we want to be memorable in the workplace. Motivational Interviewing awakens one's inner sense of purpose and enthusiasm for the hard work being done during this health care crisis. Objectives: Describe the characteristics of influential people; Become aware of compassionate listening and its impact on suffering; and Discuss the impact of difficult judgement of others
Published: June 18, 2020
Multimedia
Contingency management (CM) is an effective behavioral intervention that provides tangible reinforcement when target behaviors are completed and objectively verified. A large body of literature supports the use of CM for the treatment of persons with substance use disorders (SUDs). Many applications of CM in treating SUDs focus on abstinence, providing monetary rewards or prizes when clients provide objective evidence of abstinence from drugs (e.g., urine samples). Contingency management has also been adapted successfully to reinforce other behaviors, including treatment attendance, medication adherence, and treatment-related activities (e.g., submitting job applications, attending medical appointments). Despite this strong empirical foundation, CM has only been widely disseminated within large self-contained healthcare systems (e.g., Veterans Affairs).  This workshop will review the application of CM to promote positive behavior change in substance use disorder treatment settings.  Attendees will learn how to design and implement an effective CM program. Specifically, 1) the theoretical underpinnings and supporting empirical literature, 2) different types of CM programs (i.e., voucher, prize), 3) effective design features, 4) most common deviations from evidence-based protocols and how to avoid them, 5) common barriers, 6) how to calculate costs of delivering CM incentives themselves and 7) strategies for designing your own protocol. After the webinar, participants will be able to understand CM theory and the supporting empirical literature; recognize different types of CM programs; recognize effective  features of CM Interventions and reinforcement schedules; and understand common deviations from evidence-based protocols and how to avoid them.
Published: June 12, 2020
Multimedia
Mat Roosa, LCSW-R, was a founding member of NIATx and has been a NIATx coach on numerous projects. In this episode, Mat gives an overview of NIATx and process improvement in behavioral health. 
Published: June 3, 2020
Print Media
In response to the COVID19 pandemic, the New England ATTC team has developed products in partnership with the South Africa ATTC to support our partners and constituents.  Our ATTC is well positioned to continue supporting people with off-the-shelf products and our virtual trainings and technical assistance remain available. In this time of increased online engagement – meetings, trainings, technical assistance, and more – it is important for facilitators to be prepared when hosting online meetings. This one-page guide helps facilitators physically set up for online meetings including video conferencing and includes tips for audience engagement.
Published: May 27, 2020
Multimedia
This final session briefly reviews the prior training content and gets into more detail about caring for the substance exposed newborn and infant. In this session there was more time for discussion, Q&A, and problem solving based on actual cases, which was provided by the attendees.
Published: May 18, 2020
Print Media
The information provided on this guide will improve your ability to be fully engaged in a virtual meeting. Main focus: 1. Participate fully and critically in online learning. This means coming prepared with thoughtful questions, using the technology available to you, and making sure you do the individual work in order to get the most out of the group time. 2. Be patient when engaging in new online meeting platforms. There is a learning curve, and it is okay! Do your best to engage with the technology. 3. Be intentional about tapping into the knowledge of the online community.
Published: April 30, 2020
Print Media
A report brought to you by the South Southwest ATTC and NFARtec about the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services efforts to expand behavioral health treatment and recovery services through telehealth and Grand Lake Mental Health Center Collaborative Program Model.This version includes an Executive Summary.
Published: April 29, 2020
Print Media
A report brought to you by the South Southwest ATTC and NFARtec about the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services efforts to expand behavioral health treatment and recovery services through telehealth and Grand Lake Mental Health Center Collaborative Program Model.  
Published: April 29, 2020
Toolkit
In this time of increased online engagement – meetings, trainings, technical assistance, and more – it is important for facilitators to be prepared when hosting in online meetings. The South Africa HIV ATTC has developed a series of 1-page guides to provide guidance for online engagement. These products were adapted from the larger resource developed by the Pacific Southwest Mental Health TTC to ensure cultural relevance. This one-page guide helps facilitators to physically set up for online meetings including video conferencing.   Related Items:  General Guidelines for Virtual Meetings (found here) Group Norms for Online Engagement (found here) Facilitator Guidance for Online Engagement (found here)  
Published: April 23, 2020
Toolkit
In this time of increased online engagement – meetings, trainings, technical assistance, and more – it is important for facilitators to be prepared when hosting in online meetings. The South Africa HIV ATTC has developed a series of 1-page guides to provide guidance for online engagement. These products were adapted from the larger resource developed by the Pacific Southwest Mental Health TTC to ensure cultural relevance. This guide helps facilitators to prepare, set up, and host engaging online sessions.   This product is available in English and Afrikaans. Additional languages are coming soon!   Related Items: Guidance for Setting Up Online Meetings (found here) General Guidelines for Virtual Meetings (found here) Group Norms for Online Engagement (found here)  
Published: April 23, 2020
Toolkit
In this time of increased online engagement – meetings, trainings, technical assistance, and more – it is important for facilitators and participants to practice good etiquette when participating in video conferencing. The South Africa HIV ATTC has developed this one-sheet guide highlighting the norms and practices for online engagement.   This product is available in English and Afrikaans. Additional languages are coming soon!   Related Items: Guidance for Setting Up Online Meetings (found here) Facilitator Guidance for Online Engagement (found here) General Guidelines for Virtual Meetings (found here)
Published: April 23, 2020
Multimedia
This comprehensive online course, developed by the Northwest ATTC, features separate modules for each of four common personnel roles in healthcare organizations: decision-makers, clinical supervisors, direct care staff, and administrative support staff. Healthcare organizations may utilize these training modules as means of an initial introduction to CM principles and practices for their staff; however, the primary intent of this online course is as a bridge to more intensive technical assistance—as outlined by Hartzler and colleagues in this article in the Journal of Substance Use and Addiction Treatment (2023) (free online). All four modules include an introduction to contingency management (CM) describing: its core elements, 3 scientifically-supported systems, how it can be used in healthcare settings to have a positive impact on clients.   Each module also offers unique content on how each role can successfully integrate CM into their program.  Note: The Administrative Support Staff module is currently available here. It will be added to HealtheKnowledge (along with 1.0 CE credit) later in spring 2023. CEU Available! 1.0 Decision Makers, 2.5 Clinical Supervisors, 2.0 Direct Care Staff.  In response to SAMHSA instruction provided to State Opioid Response grantees (in FY 22 SOR Grants TI-22-005, Appendix J: Contingency Management), a set of four supplemental brief information guides have been created on targeted topics to complement the material included in this online course. These information guides provide further information on: Discussing Client Eligibility, Allowable Rewards, Drug Screening Methods, and Documentation Practices. (*Note:  The View Resource link will take you to the HealtheKnowledge platform, where the training is housed. If you do not already have an account on HealtheKnowledge, you will be prompted to set one up before you can continue on to the course site. If you register and it doesn't take you back to the course page, click "Home" in the menu and look for it under the category "Special Topics in Behavioral Health" or return to this page and click the link again. For more assistance, visit the How to Use HealtheKnowledge site or contact their support staff.)
Published: April 3, 2020
Curriculum Package
Pacific Behavioral Health Collaborating Council (PBHCC) IC&RC Alcohol and Drug Counselor (ADC) Academy Curriculum Developed by the Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center and UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs The IC&RC Alcohol and Drug Counselor (ADC) Academy curriculum is a weeklong training designed to prepare individuals based in the six U.S.-affiliated Pacific Jurisdictions to successfully pass the IC&RC ADC certification exam. The duration of the ADC Academy is forty hours of content spread across five full days of training. Funding for the development of the ADC Academy was provided by the Pacific Behavioral Health Collaborating Council (PBHCC). The curriculum is broken into five modules/days, which include: • Day 1: Introduction to the IC&RC ADC Performance Domains and Review of Psychoactive Drugs • Day 2: Core Competencies of Addiction Counselors – Knowledge and Skill Acquisition of Screening, Intake, Orientation, Assessment, Treatment Planning, and Counseling • Day 3: Core Competencies of Addiction Counselors – Knowledge and Skill Acquisition of Case Management, Crisis Intervention, Client and Family Education, Referral, Report and Record Keeping, and Consultation • Day 4: Core Competencies of Addiction Counselors – Prevention and Treatment of HIV/AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections • Day 5: Course Review and Test-Taking Strategies To view and download the IC&RC ADC Academy Curriculum, please visit: http://uclaisap.org/slides/icrc-adc-academy-curriculum.html Acknowledgements: This training was developed by Dr. Thomas E. Freese, PhD (Director of Training of UCLA ISAP and Director of the Pacific Southwest ATTC), Alex R. Ngiraingas, MEd, CSAC II, ICADC, ICPS, and Dr. Christopher C. C. Rocchio, PhD, LCSW, CSAC, ICADC (Clinical Specialist, UCLA) in August of 2018 under contract number 2018-002 by the University of California Los Angeles, Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (UCLA ISAP) and the Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Center (PSATTC) for the Pacific Behavioral Health Collaborating Council (PBHCC). Additional resource provided by SAMHSA, grant number UR1TI080211. *All PowerPoint presentations and trainer guides are 508 compliant.
Published: April 2, 2020
Presentation Slides
This is a training on Trauma Integrated Addiction Treatment.  
Published: March 25, 2020
Multimedia
Providing SUD services during a pandemic requires a mix of disaster preparedness, safety precautions, telehealth, and ethics. During her tenure as a leader in SUD treatment, Sheila Weix has been involved with emergencies related to the HIV epidemic, 9/11, and the 2008 economic collapse. She is currently applying this experience in an outpatient treatment service that includes medication-assisted treatment in rural Wisconsin during the COVID19 pandemic. Webinar participants will learn about: Safety precautions How to move all services to telehealth Reimbursement contingencies Leadership actions underway to address this rapidly changing situation    Additional Resources: Transcript_SUD in a Pandemic_Bigger Boat Part 1  
Published: March 21, 2020
Curriculum Package
This 5-part Curriculum Infusion Package (CIP) on Compassion Fatigue and the Behavioral Health Workforce was developed in 2020 by the Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center (PSATTC). The main developers included Nancy Roget, MS, Joyce Hartje, PhD, and Terra Hamblin, MA, with additional guidance and editing support provided by Beth Rutkowski, MPH, Thomas E. Freese, PhD, and Michael Shafer, PhD. The Compassion Fatigue CIP was created to help college and university faculty infuse brief, science-based content into existing substance use disorder-related course syllabi (e.g., foundation of addiction courses, ethics, counseling courses, etc.). Instructors can select the specific content to infuse throughout the duration of the course depending on specific needs of the learners. Each slide contains notes for the instructor to provide guidance as necessary. References are included for each slide and handouts when possible. Part 1 provides a brief overview of the behavioral health workforce and associated shortages, and introduces the demands on the workforce. Part 2 focuses on compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress. Part 3 provides a brief overview of how organizations can help individuals avoid experiencing burnout. Part 4 focuses on actions that behavioral health professionals can take to prevent compassion fatigue. And Part 5 focuses on self-care as an ethical duty in order to manage compassion fatigue.  The slide decks are designed to be used by academic faculty in behavioral health programs, trainers, behavioral health providers, and state/county agency staff members for a variety of audiences. If you require further information on this topic, please do not hesitate to contact the Pacific Southwest ATTC (http://www.psattc.org). You are free to use these slides and the pictures, but please give credit to the Pacific Southwest ATTC when using them by keeping the logo on each slide and referencing the Pacific Southwest ATTC at the beginning of your presentation. The Pacific Southwest ATTC (HHS Region 9) is part of the SAMHSA-funded ATTC network that offers training/technical assistance (TA) services through a partnership with UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, Arizona State University School of Social Work , and University of Nevada-Reno Center for the Application of Substance Abuse Technologies. HHS Region 9 is comprised of Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, and the six U.S.-affiliated Pacific Jurisdictions (American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and Republic of Palau). For additional information, please access its website at http://www.psattc.org.  
Published: March 20, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
The February 2020 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Black History Month | Mental Health: Resources to Prepare Educators | Prevention: Substance Use Prevention and Stopping the Spread of HIV/AIDS | ORN: One-year Extension | Region 3 Spotlight: CLOUD. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox.
Published: February 4, 2020
Multimedia
In this webinar from January 2020, information specialist Meg Brunner, MLIS (University of Washington), talked about common barriers to finding valid science-based information online and recommended some best practices and tools for locating, vetting, and applying statistics, research, and other information related to substance use disorders and mental health. Download slides | Watch recording Webinar category: Other
Published: January 29, 2020
Multimedia
Dr. Randy Brown will review the history of the ECHO tele-educational model and the history particular to the University of Wisconsin Project ECHO ACCEPT clinic regarding substance use disorders and related complications. He will review the general content of the curriculum and the format for these educational sessions.  Presented on November 22, 2019. 
Published: January 7, 2020
Presentation Slides
This slide deck provides a brief overview of the role recovery capital plays in increasing assets and identifying barriers to recovery (Hennessey, 2017). It is designed to be used by behavioral health academic faculty, trainers, and state agency staff members for a variety of audiences. Each slide has notes for the presenter to provide guidance if necessary. References are included on the slides and in the notes. If you require further information on this topic, please contact the Mountain Plains Addiction Technology Transfer Center (MPATTC). You are free to use these slides and pictures but please give credit to the MPATTC when using them by keeping the branding and referencing the ATTC at the beginning of your presentation.      
Published: December 9, 2019
Website
The Mountain Plains ATTC partnered with University of North Dakota’s (UND) ECHO Clinic to create a seven-part ECHO series using an interdisciplinary approach to train health professionals on pain management and recovery titled, “Addressing Substance Use Disorder in 2019: An Interprofessional Approach to Pain Management and Recovery”. This seven-part ECHO Series provides a venue for a variety of health professionals to learn how to help patients/clients manage their pain without the use of opioids. Each month a different health professional presented on how to management pain from their professional perspectives (e.g., Occupational Therapist; Addiction Counselor; Nutritionist; Chiropractor; Physical Therapist; Music Therapist; and Psychiatrist) in order to promote interdisciplinary approaches especially as it relates to Opioid Use Disorders and preventing overdose. Finally, a rural perspective will be included in each session. A typical ECHO structure will be followed for the seven sessions including a 20 minute didactic followed by a case study and discussion. To view this 7-part series, other Project Echo presentations on the management of opioid use disorders (OUD), and/or get additional information visit UND’s Center for Rural Health Project Echo webpage. In addition, all Project ECHO teleECHO™ sessions are recorded and available for continuing medical education (CME) credit.
Published: September 30, 2019
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The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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