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Products and Resources Catalog

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Multimedia
  The Danya Institute continues its collaborative efforts to develop and strengthen the specialized behavioral health and primary healthcare workforce to provide evidence-based and promising practices in the treatment and prevention of mental health and substance use disorders. The Danya Institute manages SAMHSA-funded Region 3 Technology Transfer Centers: Central East Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) Central East Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) Central East Prevention Technology Transfer Center (PTTC) Each center's director will provide an overview of their missions and goals. The TTCs are committed to helping the workforce achieve meaningful and lasting changes in policies, programs, and practices that will enhance services and improve outcomes for individuals and their families who have, or are at risk of developing, a behavioral health condition. In part, this is accomplished by providing no cost, individualized, locally-driven training and technical assistance (T/TA) to enhance the delivery of behavioral health prevention, treatment and recovery support services. OBJECTIVES: Orient attendees to the technology transfer model Inform attendees of T/TA opportunities Educate attendees of the process to request T/TA Inform attendees of joining an Advisory Boards Provide a Q/A forum to answer questions regarding your T/TA needs This webinar was made in collaboration between the Central East ATTC, the Central East MHTTC, and the Central East PTTC
Published: September 18, 2019
Presentation Slides
MIA:STEP is a training for those that supervise or mentor treatment providers in a clinical setting and are expected to give feedback and coaching to help practitioners improve their skills and effectiveness. This training for clinical supervisors provides practical tools to be used to enhance treatment providers' Motivational Interviewing (MI) skills. 
Published: May 31, 2019
Multimedia
This webinar introduced Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), showed how ACT is applied to treat addictions, and briefly surveyed the science supporting ACT for addictions. Numerous clinical examples to illustrate the treatment model were also presented in a highly engaging and informative way. Presented by Jonathan Bricker, MD, Health and Behavioral Innovations in Technology; Fred Hutchinson Center; UW Department of Psychology. Download slides | Watch recording Webinar category: Treatment - General
Published: May 22, 2019
Presentation Slides
Presenter James E Campbell, LPC, LAC, MAC, CACII Objectives  Be provided with information regarding the prevalence of Substance Use Disorders in the general population Enhance understanding of both points of tension and common themes of the faith and treatment/recovery communities And Explore potential ways the faith community helps to meet the needs of individuals with substance use disorders
Published: April 30, 2019
Presentation Slides
This training is an introduction to the evidence-based clinical method of Motivational Interviewing, an effective approach in the care of challenging clients, and will provide participants with an opportunity to explore creative ways of integrating these approaches. Motivational Interviewing is a client-centered, evidence-based, directive method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence. After orientation to the underlying spirit, structure, and principles of Motivational Interviewing, practical exercises will help participants strengthen empathy skills, recognize and elicit patient change talk, and roll with resistance.
Published: April 24, 2019
Multimedia
This webinar re-examined compassion fatigue and self-care in light of neuroscience research and offered practical tools for professionals to use to mitigate their own compassion fatigue and strengthen their resilience. Presenter: Troy Montserrat-Gonzales, LPC, LMHC, Multnomah County Health Department
Published: April 24, 2019
Website
In partnership with an NIAAA funded project awarded to researchers at Rhode Island Hospital, we developed an intensive TA curriculum to promote the implementation of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment into pediatric trauma centers. The curriculum includes an online orientation video, three self-paced webinars, self-paced submission of role plays with standardized case vignettes, and monthly coaching calls. Materials are currently being actively piloted and will be available in the ATTC Network once finalized.
Published: April 23, 2019
eNewsletter or Blog
Electronic newsletter featuring news and updates on events. April 2019 issue includes a feature article by Todd Molfenter and Matt Roosa on implementing evidence-based practices, resources for Alcohol Awareness Month, a recap of the NIATx Change Leader Academy in Minnesota. 
Published: April 15, 2019
Presentation Slides
This training provides information about the use of Medication Assisted Treatment for Opioid Use Disorders in the criminal justice system.
Published: April 9, 2019
Presentation Slides
This course consists of two interconnected components: an online course and a face-to-face training, and is intended for supervisors in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment and recovery settings. The course totals 30 contact hours and introduces clinical supervisors, along with persons preparing to become supervisors, to the knowledge and skills essential to the practice of supervision.The Clinical Supervision Foundations course is especially suited for: Beginning clinical supervisors; Clinical Supervisors who would like to enhance or review the fundamental skills needed to be a successful clinical supervisor; Counselors who are being groomed to become clinical supervisors; and Behavioral healthcare professionals who want to learn more about clinical supervision.
Published: March 13, 2019
Presentation Slides
This one-day workshop will provide a brief overview of the medical, psychological and behavioral aspects of opiate abuse/dependence. Agonist, partial agonist, antagonist and non-medication assisted therapy will be discussed and include:   a. Deciding factors between medication and non-medication assisted treatment b. Treatment protocols 
Published: March 3, 2019
Presentation Slides
Stigma is a major barrier preventing millions of people who are struggling with substance use from entering treatment today. This presentation is designed to help professionals break that stigma that creates an unnecessary barrier to treatment by understanding recovery oriented language and strategies that can be integrated into practice immediately. Participants will: Be able to identify use strengths based language to reduce stigma associated with substance use disorders. Be able to conceptualize the factors that influence stigma associated with substance use disorders and their consequences. Be able to discuss targets and interventions aimed at addressing stigma associated with substance use.
Published: February 27, 2019
eNewsletter or Blog
News and events from the Great Lakes ATTC, February 2019. 
Published: February 12, 2019
Multimedia
Dr. Tom Freese shares insights on substance use disorder treatment and recovery issues that affect the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. Dr. Freese is the director of the Pacific Southwest ATTC and also served as co-director of the YMSM+LGBTCenter of Excellence. 
Published: January 18, 2019
eNewsletter or Blog
 Monthly electronic newsletter, Great Lakes ATTC, January 2019. 
Published: January 14, 2019
eNewsletter or Blog
Great Lakes ATTC Newsroom December 2018 This month's issue features an update on 2018, tips on staying in recovery over the holidays, an invitation to visit the new Great Lakes ATTC website, along with news from SAMHSA and the Network Coordinating Office and best wishes of the season from the Great Lakes ATTC staff.   
Published: January 2, 2019
Multimedia
This webinar, presented on December 19, 2018 by Mary Hatch-Maillette, PhD, described how and why SUD treatment counselors should strive for greater comfort and ease in talking to patients about their sexual risk behavior. This includes how counselors can improve their own skill and comfort, a description of the MI Spirit approach, and how they can better link sexual risk with substance use, treatment and recovery when talking with their patients. About the presenter: Mary Hatch-Maillette, PhD, is the co-director of the NIDA Clinical Trials Network's Pacific Northwest Node, and a researcher at the University of Washington Addictions, Drug & Alcohol Institute. She specializes in substance use treatment, HIV risk behavior, and counselor workforce issues. She is also in private psychotherapy practice in Seattle. Download slides | Watch recording  
Published: December 19, 2018
Print Media
Poster for health care providers to use to explain SBIRT. Size:11 x 17 poster English and Spanish
Published: November 28, 2018
Curriculum Package
Findings form the National Institute on Drug Abuse's Clinical Trials Network protocol documented that one Motivational Interviewing (MI) assessment interview resulted in higher retention rates during the first four MIA:STEP Brochure Coverweeks of treatment when compared to assessments as usual.The MIA:STEP Blending Team designed empirically supported mentoring products to enhance the MI skills of treatment providers, as well as supervisory tools to fortify a supervisor's ability to provide structured, focused, and effective clinical supervision. MIA:STEP introduces an effective strategy for observation-based clinical supervision, the use of which has potential to improve counselor skills beyond MI.            
Published: November 26, 2018
Curriculum Package
The Clinical Supervision Foundations course was developed by the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) Network as an introduction to the essential elements of supervisory practice. In response to the need for an educational program which helps supervisors qualify for credentialing, the course presents participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to assure quality of care and promote the professional development of addictions counselors. Knowing it is difficult for supervisors to be away from the worksite for extended periods, the course was intentionally designed utilizing a combination of online, face-to-face, and worksite formats to make up this 30-hour course. The 14-hour, ten module online course is self-paced, and can be taken as a standalone. It is intended to introduce basic concepts and resources, while providing a conceptual overview of the work of a clinical supervisor. The face-to-face segment, which requires the online course as a prerequisite, delves further into some of the more practical aspects of supervision and builds in opportunities for skills practice, offering a worksite aspect giving supervisors an opportunity to self-assess their knowledge and skills, as well as create a plan for continuing their professional development.    
Published: November 19, 2018
Presentation Slides
The Clinical Supervision Foundations course was developed by the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) Network as an introduction to the essential elements of supervisory practice. In response to the need for an educational program which helps supervisors qualify for credentialing, the course presents participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to assure quality of care and promote the professional development of addictions counselors. Knowing it is difficult for supervisors to be away from the worksite for extended periods, the course was intentionally designed utilizing a combination of online, face-to-face, and worksite formats to make up this 30-hour course. The 14-hour, ten module online course is self-paced, and can be taken as a standalone. It is intended to introduce basic concepts and resources, while providing a conceptual overview of the work of a clinical supervisor. The face-to-face segment, which requires the online course as a prerequisite, delves further into some of the more practical aspects of supervision and builds in opportunities for skills practice, offering a worksite aspect giving supervisors an opportunity to self-assess their knowledge and skills, as well as create a plan for continuing their professional development.    
Published: November 19, 2018
Print Media
Performance Assessment Rubrics for the Addiction Counseling Competencies. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), in cooperation with the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) Network, originally published Addiction Counseling Competencies: The Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes of Professional Practice as a Technical Assistance Publication (TAP 21) in 1988. In the years since, TAP 21 has become a standard for the development of addiction counseling curricula and the assessment of counseling proficiency. In 2005 the document underwent a thorough review and revision to align with evolving developments in the field. This document is a companion product to TAP 21. It describes counselor/clinician proficiency along a continuum marked by four distinct benchmark descriptions of counselor ability for each of the competencies. Such a continuum is referred to as a rubric. More will be said about the continuum later.   
Published: November 19, 2018
eNewsletter or Blog
Blog produced by the ATTC Network and NIATx. Features bimonthly posts on topics related to improving clinical services and business practices. Features posts by ATTC Network staff and guest bloggers.
Published: October 1, 2018
Presentation Slides
This presentation by Professor Bronwyn Myers discusses the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) training model in application to substance use disorders. Professor Bronwyn Myers is a Chief specialist scientist in the Alcohol Tobacco and Other Drug Use Research Unit at the South African Medical Research Council. Professor Myers also serves as an Expert Technical Assistance Advisor for the South Africa HIV ATTC.
Published: September 20, 2018
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The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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