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Print Media
The Invitation to Change (ITC) is a holistic helping model for families affected by substance use, drawing from concepts also found in CRAFT, MI, and ACT. Participants will leave the training with a complete set of tools for empowering families to support their loved ones effectively. More about the approach here. The deadline to apply is April 19, 2024. This training is a collaboration with the Great Lakes ATTC, South Southwest ATTC, Mountain Plains ATTC, Northwest ATTC, South Southeast ATTC, Mid America ATTC, and the ATTC Network Coordinating Office.
Published: April 2, 2024
Print Media
Xylazine (or “tranq”) is a non-opioid sedative and tranquilizer only approved for use in veterinary medicine. However, over the past several years, human consumption of xylazine has begun rapidly increasing. Although initially only identified in illicit drug supplies in limited areas, xylazine has been found in 48 states as of April 2023. Xylazine is frequently, though not exclusively, used in conjunction with opioids, particularly fentanyl—due to xylazine’s ability to prolong their effects. Xylazine use presents many potential dangers to people, including an increased risk of overdose and the development of necrotizing tissue damage. This factsheet details key concerns, overdose responses, harm reduction techniques, and more.   To download the factsheet in English, please click the  "Understanding Xylazine" button on the right side of the page.   This factsheet is now available in Spanish. Translation services by the National Hispanic and Latino Behavioral Health Center of Excellence. Traducido por: To download the full version of the Spanish factsheet, please click the "Comprender la xilacina" button on the right side of the page.  
Published: March 15, 2024
Print Media
DESCRIPTION Though trauma is linked with Substance Use Disorder for people from all walks of life, LGBTQ communities experience unique sources and dynamics of trauma, as well as distinct influences and social consequences that impact the prevalence of Substance Use Disorders within the population. These may include family rejection and estrangement, increased incidence of childhood sexual abuse, identity discernment stress and faith-related shame, survivor’s guilt for those who lost dozens of friends in the early days of the AIDS epidemic, and many other special situations. This webinar will highlight some of the dimensions of trauma specific to LGBTQ individuals, substance use behaviors linked to those events, and some of the unique sites of resilience and support available within LGBTQ communities. Please use the download attachment 1 button on the right side of the page to to view the entire  English factsheet.       This factsheet is now available in Spanish. Translation services by the National Hispanic and Latino Behavioral Health Center of Excellence. Traducido por:   To download the full version of the Spanish factsheet, use the Download Attachment 2 button on the right side of the page.
Published: March 15, 2024
Print Media
The Central East ATTC is committed to fostering a positive and affirming environment that acknowledges LGBTQ identities and realities. Though nearly every care provider expresses the intention of creating a welcoming environment for LGBTQ clients, good intentions alone are not enough to maintain a practice free of prejudice, repair poor office forms and protocols, minimize microaggressions, and eradicate disrespect for the lived experiences of sexual and gender minority community members. When a member of any marginalized group enters your setting, they are scanning for potential threats, hazards, and disappointments with their care as a reflexive gesture of self-protection. This factsheet provides an overview of indicators for creating safety and engagement techniques that can help build trust and reassurance for your LGBTQ clients. Download this factsheet to learn more.   To download the factsheet in English, please use the download attachment 1 on the right side of the page. This factsheet is now available in Spanish. Translation services by the National Hispanic and Latino Behavioral Health Center of Excellence. Traducido por: To download the full version of the Spanish factsheet, use the Download Attachment 2 button on the right side of the page.  
Published: March 15, 2024
Print Media
 DESCRIPTION The COVID-19 pandemic fundamentally shifted the health and wellbeing of every human on planet Earth. LGBTQ community members were impacted early in the crisis, and continue to show disparities in contracting the virus, as well as higher rates of death, disability, substance use disorders, and suicide related to pandemic distress. These impacts were not evenly distributed across all LGBTQ people, however, but were concentrated among queer and transgender of color and gender diverse people in general. New research is emerging that points to both expected and surprising impacts of the disease unique to LGBTQ people. This webinar will explore LGBTQ population dynamics, needs, and ways to support vulnerable community members as the world population emerges into the post-COVID reality.   Please use the download attachment 1 button on the right side of the page to view the entire factsheet in English.     This factsheet is now available in Spanish. Translation services by the National Hispanic and Latino Behavioral Health Center of Excellence. Traducido por: To download the full version of the Spanish factsheet, use the Download Attachment 2 button on the right side of the page.  
Published: March 15, 2024
Print Media
La hoja informativa provee información sobre la importancia del servicio de navegación de pacientes y su propósito de guiar a la persona a través del sistema de salud. Se le apoya en la identificación del o los diagnósticos, tratamientos y seguimiento de condiciones médicas, incluyendo el trastorno por uso de sustancias. Proveyendo asistencia en la programación de citas, pruebas médicas y en obtener ayuda financiera, legal y social, de ser necesarias. La finalidad de la navegación de pacientes es la eliminación de barreras para lograr la atención adecuada en los servicios de salud que recibe la persona.
Published: January 16, 2024
Print Media
The purpose of the listening sessions was to gather information from family members and loved ones of people with substance use challenges to better understand family members’ experiences supporting and seeking support for their loved one who is using substances; to ask what questions family members have about supporting their loved one who is using substances; to ask who or what is providing support for family members; and the unmet needs for support for family members. Version 1 of this report in February 2023, which described the process and findings from the initial round of listening session in 2022. Version 2 of this report describes the process and findings of additional follow up community outreach in 2023 to enhance the first phase of this consultation process: including a new round of listening sessions with family members and loved ones of people who use substances.  This project is in collaboration with the African American Behavioral Health Center of Excellence and National Hispanic and Latino ATTC.
Published: January 5, 2024
Print Media
Mid-America ATTC partnered with Facente Consulting to launch a harm reduction consultation pilot program in early 2022.  The goal of this program was to act as a harm reduction resource to empower individuals and organizations seeking to implement or improve evidence-based practices within their systems to reduce stigma and promote the safety and well-being of people who use drugs. The poster outlines the findings of the pilot program.
Published: November 21, 2023
Print Media
In spring of 2023, Mountain Plains ATTC conducted a survey in an effort to better understand the training and technical assistance needs of individuals providing SUD treatment and recovery services in Region 8. The purpose of the survey was to determine providers’ perceptions, practices, and training/technical assistance needs, specifically in relation to harm reduction (HR) services/activities for SUDs. An invitation to participate in the survey was emailed posted on the Mountain Plains ATTC website and was sent to all constituents within Region 8 for which the Mountain Plains ATTC had email addresses. In addition, participants were asked to invite others within their agencies and networks to participate. The survey was completed between March 9 to April 12, 2023. Approval to conduct the survey was obtained from the University of North Dakota Institutional Review Board. Results from this survey will help Mountain Plains ATTC better collaborate with providers and stakeholders throughout the region in the development of new products, training materials, and technical assistance. It is also hoped that this report will provide readers with a snapshot of the perceptions, practices, and technical assistance/training needs of the SUD provider services workforce in Region 8.
Published: October 13, 2023
Print Media
The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on September 21, 2023. This discussion reviewed the article, “Understanding Stigma Through the Lived Experiences of People With Opioid Use Disorder.” Article link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/37390780/ View the September 2023 RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: September 21, 2023
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Recovery Month flyer
Published: September 19, 2023
Print Media
  Treatment for Individuals who Use Stimulants TRUST A Protocol Using Empirically-Supported Behavioral Treatments for People with Stimulant Use Disorders     Purpose of the TRUST-MAIN Manual The authors of this manual have been involved in StimUD-related research, treatment, and training efforts for over 30 years. Over this period, the research on StimUD and its treatment has vastly increased and there is a great interest in better understanding StimUD and providing effective treatment for people who use cocaine and methamphetamine. We have produced this manual to promote the use of research-supported strategies for StimUD treatment. The manual attempts to combine a number of strategies into a framework that is appropriate for use by clinicians in settings where people with StimUD receive treatment. This manual is not intended to be a cookbook and the materials used and the framework for their use are not intended to be an inflexible, one-size-fits-all prescription. At the end of the manual, we list a variety of treatment materials (see Appendix) that can be added or substituted for the ones we are recommending. We provide the contents of this manual and the framework for combining these treatment materials as one example for how research-supported strategies can be combined into a structured treatment experience. The manual was developed at a time when CM with adequate incentives was considered impossible in the U.S. Hence, this manual was produced to offer a possible, albeit a non-evidence-based and certainly less effective alternative to CM. As evidence-based CM protocols using adequate incentives are increasingly being developed and implemented in the U.S., there is interest in having CM delivered within a framework of other evidence-based behavioral support. The use of the materials in the TRUST Manual to augment CM treatment is another possible use of the manual, either in the form of a 12-week framework, or as ad hoc behavioral support materials. The audience for the manual includes healthcare professionals who provide treatment services for individuals with StimUD. One category of these professionals who we particularly hope will benefit are therapists and other behavioral health clinicians who work in substance use disorder specialty care treatment programs. The manual has been written with this group in mind.   The manual intends to: Provide new information about the use and effects of cocaine and methamphetamine. Present several key clinical challenges that clinicians face when treating this population. Review the evidence-based treatment strategies for StimUD treatment. Discuss how motivational interviewing (MI) is central to the effective engagement of individuals in treatment and to assisting them with behavior change during treatment. Present how elements of community reinforcement approach (CRA) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be used to assist individuals with StimUD to reduce/discontinue their drug use and prevent relapse. Describe a procedure for incorporating positive incentives into the treatment milieu and/or support the use of CM for the treatment of StimUD. Provide information and guidance for how physical exercise can benefit individuals who are attempting to reduce/discontinue their use of methamphetamine and cocaine. Describe a plan for providing continuing care to assist individuals to sustain the progress they have made in a structured treatment program. List an array of manuals and training resources for other research-supported substance use disorder treatment approaches.   For those working with people receiving care for Opioid Use Disorder, an adapted version is available Treatment for Individuals who Use Stimulants while on MOUD TRUST—MOUD THERAPIST MANUAL & PATIENT WORKBOOK       Purpose of the TRUST-MOUD Manual The TRUST MOUD Manual is intended to be used with patients who are struggling with stimulant (cocaine/amphetamine) use while in treatment for OUD with methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone. Working with patients presenting in MOUD treatment is a challenging, yet incredibly rewarding experience. While it is rewarding, it can also be frustrating. Stimulant use among these patients is common and many patients don’t see their use as problematic. In fact, for some patients who use stimulants sporadically, they may not need treatment. But certainly, for some patients on MOUD, cocaine/meth use is extremely detrimental to the effectiveness of their MOUD treatment and is a serious health problem. However, in many cases, regardless of the severity of use, the patients often don’t recognize their stimulant use as a problem, and they are not interested in intensive treatment. The materials in the TRUST MOUD Manual attempt to provide this patient population with a useful set of information in a format that they find acceptable. The materials adopt CRA, CBT, and MI content and present it in a clear and relevant form that addresses the challenges they face while in MOUD treatment. We try to avoid long, didactic, lecturing materials, but rather try to create accessible topics and examples. TRUST was developed with flexibility in mind to optimize patient engagement and retention. TRUST materials can be presented in 1:1 sessions and can be scheduled with patients or in on-going stimulant treatment groups. Topics can be presented in a sequence and frequency that lets therapists select content to meet patient needs. The 24 TRUST worksheets can be used in a flexible manner to be relevant and useful to patients. Consistency is important when using the TRUST Manual. Set and adhere to meeting days and times. Start and end sessions on time. If used in a group format, have some group participation guidelines. Adhering to a specific session format and timing will enhance patients’ understanding of the group/individual session process and will allow them to focus on acquisition of new material. Patients using stimulants will undoubtedly experience cognitive impairment as they participate in sessions and utilize the TRUST materials. Slowing down to allow patients to gather their thoughts and express themselves during group or individual sessions is important. In addition, using multi-media and repetition can be helpful for patients to grasp new concepts. Use of Motivational Interviewing as a fundamental style and interpersonal approach is essential to success when using TRUST materials. Ideally, TRUST session attendance should be paired with medication visit attendance to reduce the travel burden on patients. This is especially true in rural areas, where public transportation is non-existent, or when a patient has employment, education, or homemaking responsibilities. When possible, patients should have an opportunity to determine therapy visit days and times based upon their scheduling needs. Research has shown that aerobic exercise improves cognitive capacity, reduces depression and anxiety, and improves cardiac and pulmonary function for individuals with stimulant use disorder. Several of the TRUST worksheets discuss the benefits of exercise as part of a treatment effort to reducing stimulant use. Encouraging patients to exercise will also help them to manage emotional highs and lows and help them structure their day. Getting patients to exercise is often difficult and requires ongoing encouragement and support. The TRUST materials and their use with patients on MOUD should be used with a strong harm reduction foundation. The #1 priority for this group of patients is retention in treatment with MOUD. Participation in treatment activities with TRUST materials, when appropriate, should be encouraged, rewarded, and praised. In our opinion, requiring treatment attendance with TRUST materials, with a threat of MOUD discontinuation is never justified. In an era of lethal drugs including fentanyl, retention on MOUD is essential. Other harm reduction activities should be combined with TRUST materials. Access to safe injection supplies, ready access to naloxone and fentanyl test strips, and as new drugs emerge (e.g., xylazine), it is critical to provide new information and test strips as they become available. Many patients in MOUD treatment have multiple life challenges, including use of numerous drugs and alcohol, food insecurity, being unhoused, unemployment, as well as both mental health and physical health issues. To be successful, patients will need to be retained in treatment for a significant period of time, if not for a lifetime. These issues are not going to be resolved overnight, but rather through consistent and prolonged effort. We hope these materials can be useful to your work with patients on MOUD.   Authors Richard Rawson, PhD Richard A. Rawson, PhD, is Professor Emeritus at the UCLA Department of Psychiatry and a Research Professor at the Vermont Center for Behavior and Health at the University of Vermont. He received a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of Vermont in 1974. Dr. Rawson conducted numerous clinical trials on pharmacological and psychosocial addiction treatment and extensive system evaluation activities in a number of states and countries. He has led addiction research and training projects for the United Nations, the World Health Organization, and the U.S. State Department, exporting science-based knowledge to many parts of the world. Dr. Rawson has published 3 books, 40 book chapters, and over 250 peer-reviewed articles and has, for almost 50 years, conducted workshops, paper presentations, and training sessions in many areas of the world.   Albert Hasson, MSW Albert L. Hasson received his MSW from UCLA and has worked in the field of addiction medicine as a researcher and a treatment provider since 1977. Mr. Hasson participated in the development of the evidence-based Matrix Model, a cognitive behavioral intervention for StimUD Treatment, and established the Matrix Institute on Addictions, Los Angeles opioid treatment program. Along with his administrative and clinical experience, Mr. Hasson has extensive experience in implementing and evaluating behavioral and pharmacologic interventions. He has served as a project director and trainer for the Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center at the UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs.   Janice Stimson, PsyD Janice Stimson, PsyD, has worked in the field of addiction treatment since 1998. For 20 years she has worked at the Matrix Institute on Addictions in the role of Clinic Director, overseeing and managing the clinic, seeing clients and supervising staff. At the clinic private adolescent and adult treatment programs coexisted along-side national research studies. Dr. Stimson held key positions in those studies and was responsible for ensuring the success of fulfilling recruitment, training, supervision, and protocol requirements.   Michael McCann, MA Michael McCann, M.A., is one of the founders of the Matrix Institute on Addictions and creators of the Matrix Model. He has overseen the operation of Matrix clinics as well as the integration of many research projects within these sites. He has over 40 years of experience in substance use disorder treatment and research, and has authored or co-authored over 40 articles, books, and manuals. He has trained and lectured extensively on evidence-based behavioral interventions, pharmacologic treatments, methamphetamine dependence, opioid dependence, and on the implementation of evidence-based treatments into clinical practice   Acknowledgements The authors would like to acknowledge the assistance provided by Thomas E. Freese, PhD, Beth Rutkowski, MPH, Gloria Miele, PhD, and Valerie P Antonini, MPH. Christine Morgan provided invaluable support with the production of the manual, along with editing support from Victoria T. Norith and Benjamin Nguyen, MSW, CPH. The materials in this manual include content and worksheets from the Matrix Model Therapist Manual (SAMHSA, 2006); from the Community Reinforcement Approach, plus Vouchers Manual (NIDA, 2020).
Published: September 11, 2023
Print Media
A reflection on Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Month and Hispanic Heritage Month will be featured in this issue by Dr. Susie Villalobos. This newsletter highlights the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, which promotes awareness about suicide and suicide prevention among Hispanic and Latino populations. Please read to learn more about the resources we are highlighting this quarter, our upcoming events and projects, and more. THIS ISSUE 1 Dicho of the Quarter 2 A Reflection by Dr. Susie Villalobos 5 Highlighting the Experts American Foundation for Suicide Prevention 7 Quarterly Highlights, and Celebrations 8 Media Corner   9 Staff Contact Information Español En esta edición, la Dra. Susie Villalobos presentará una reflexión sobre el Mes de la Salud Mental y la Prevención del Suicidio y el Mes de la Herencia Hispana. Este boletín destaca la Fundación Americana para la Prevención del Suicidio, que promueve la concientización sobre el suicidio y la prevención del suicidio entre las poblaciones hispana y latina. Lea para obtener más información sobre los recursos que destacamos este trimestre, nuestros próximos eventos y proyectos, y más. EN ESTA EDICION 1 El “Dicho” del Trimestre 2 Una Reflexión de la Dra. Susie Villalobos 5 Destacando a los Expertos: American Foundation for Suicide Prevention 7 Puntos Destacados del Trimestre y Celebraciones 8 Rincón de los Medios   9 Información de Contacto del Personal
Published: September 6, 2023
Print Media
The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on August 17, 2023. This discussion reviewed the article, “A Qualitative Analysis of Barriers to Opioid Agonist Treatment for Racial/Ethnic Minoritized Populations.” Article link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36403456/ View the August 2023 RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: August 17, 2023
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The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on July 20, 2023. This discussion reviewed the article, “Meeting People Where They Are: Implementing Hospital-Based Substance Use Harm Reduction.” Article link: https://harmreductionjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12954-022-00594-9 View the July 2023 RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: July 20, 2023
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  The Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC are dedicated to integrating cultural responsiveness into all our training and technical assistance offerings. We aim to help develop workforce competencies to provide equitable and inclusive care to all. Download this guide to learn more about our growing inventory of evidence-based trainings designed to improve the delivery of culturally-responsive prevention, treatment, and recovery approaches!   If you have questions about the culturally-responsive trainings we currently offer or suggestions for additional culturally-responsive trainings that would support the behavioral health workforces in our region, please contact:  Alfredo Cerrato, Senior Cultural & Workforce Development Officer ([email protected])  
Published: July 7, 2023
Print Media
The Technology Transfer Centers: Dissemination and Implementation Working Group, composed of representatives across the ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC, developed two infographics for the most common intensive technical assistance strategies used to help states, organizations, and front-line providers implement evidence-based services. The two strategies are: Learning Collaboratives External Facilitation These are two of many technical assistance strategies offered and deployed across the TTC Network. Additional infographics simply describing other strategies for consumers are in the planning stages. User-friendly infographics are expected to assist decision-makers in making more informed selections about the kinds of assistance or support they need.   Access the infographics by clicking on the Green "Download" button above and selecting between the two options.
Published: July 5, 2023
Print Media
  The Technology Transfer Centers: Dissemination and Implementation Working Group, composed of representatives across the ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC, developed two infographics for the most common intensive technical assistance strategies used to help states, organizations, and front-line providers implement evidence-based services.    The two strategies are: Learning Collaboratives External Facilitation   These are two of many technical assistance strategies offered and deployed across the TTC Network. Additional infographics simply describing other strategies for consumers are in the planning stages. User-friendly infographics are expected to assist decision-makers in making more informed selections about the kinds of assistance or support they need.    Access the infographics by clicking on the Green "Download" button above and selecting between the two options.
Published: July 5, 2023
Print Media
The New England ATTC co-hosted the Recovery Science and Harm Reduction (RSHR) Reading Group meeting on June 15, 2023. This discussion reviewed the article, “Successful Substance Use Disorder Recovery in Transitional Housing: Perspectives from African American Women.” Article link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1CBMRf0JmuvZUekaJyanWKKY4s5M_9KBh/view View the June 2023 RSHR Reading group meeting summary that includes a brief article summary and key themes that arose in discussion with the participants.
Published: June 15, 2023
Print Media
This snapshot of information is intended to inform individuals, parents, professionals, and providers of the intersection between disability & Substance Use Disorder (SUD) among Hispanic/Latino populations in the US. Español - Discapacidad y Trastornopor Uso de Sustancias (TUS) El propósito de esta reseña informativa es informar alas personas, padres, profesionales y proveedores de la intersección entre la discapacidad y el Trastorno por Uso de Sustancias (TUS) en las poblaciones Hispanas/Latinas de los EE.UU.
Published: June 9, 2023
Print Media
This snapshot of information is intended to inform individuals, parents, professionals, and providers of how the stigma around Substance Use Disorder (SUD) impacts Hispanic & Latino populations in the US. Español - Discapacidad y Trastornopor Uso de Sustancias (TUS) El propósito de esta reseña informativa es informar a las personas, padres, profesionales y proveedores sobre como el estigma en torno a los Trastornos por el Uso de Sustancias (TUS) afecta a las poblaciones Hispanas y Latinas en los EE.UU.
Published: June 9, 2023
Print Media
This Issue: LAYING GROUNDWORK FOR A HARVEST AND HEALTHY YEAR This issue will bring a reflection by our NHL ATTC Co-Director, celebrating Mental Health Awareness Month. Elisabeth Stelson discusses a Vicarious Trauma research study. Please read to learn more about the resources we are highlighting this quarter, our upcoming events and projects, and more. In This Issue 01 Dicho of the Quarter 02 A Reflection by Our NHL ATTC Co-Director 03 Article by Elisabeth Stelson, MSW, LSW, MPH (Ph.D. Candidate) 05 Quarterly Highlights, and Celebrations 06 Media Corner 07 Staff Contact Information Esta edición traerá una reflexión de nuestra Co-Directora del NHL ATTC, celebrando el Mes de Concientización sobre la Salud Mental. Elisabeth Stelson habla sobre un estudio de investigación sobre trauma vicario. Lea para obtener más información sobre los recursos que destacamos este trimestre, nuestros próximos eventos y proyectos, y más. EN ESTA EDICION 01 El “Dicho” del Trimestre 02 Una Reflexión de Nuestra Co-Directora del NHL-ATTC 03 Artículo de Elisabeth Stelson, MSW,LSW, MPH (Candidata al Doctorado) 05 Puntos Destacados del TrimestreyCelebraciones 06 Rincón de los Medios 07 Información de Contacto del Personal
Published: May 30, 2023
Print Media
****Available in English and Spanish**** This snapshot of information is intended to provide resources to individuals, parents, professionals, and providers regarding the peer recovery specialists' impact on behavioral health among Latinos in the United States.   ESPECIALISTAS EN RECUPERACIÓN ENTRE PARES PARA UNA SALUD MENTAL EQUITATIVA ENTRE HISPANOS Y LATINOS Esta reseña informativa tiene por objeto proporcionar recursos a individuos, padres, profesionales y proveedores sobre el impacto de los especialistas en recuperación entre pares en la salud mental de los Latinos en Estados Unidos.
Published: April 28, 2023
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This infographic discusses xylazine, a non-opioid animal sedative and tranquilizer, also known as "tranq," that is being used as an additive to the illicit opioid supply, particularly fentanyl. It covers key concerns including overdose risk, heart and blood pressure problems, necrotic tissue damage, treatment challenges, and harm reduction barriers. It also contains suggested actions for prevention and treatment professionals.     *Originally published April 27, 2023, revised June 5, 2023
Published: April 27, 2023
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The ATTC Network understands that words have power. A few ATTC products developed prior to 2017 may contain language that does not reflect the ATTCs’ current commitment to using affirming, person-first language. We appreciate your patience as we work to gradually update older materials. For more information about the importance of non-stigmatizing language, see “Destroying Addiction Stigma Once and For All: It’s Time” from the ATTC Network and “Changing Language to Change Care: Stigma and Substance Use Disorders” from the Providers Clinical Support System (PCSS).

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